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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.826-5.836
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nec manet ulla sui similis res: omnia migrantORIGINS AND SAVAGE PERIOD OF MANKIND But mortal man Was then far hardier in the old champaign, As well he should be, since a hardier earth Had him begotten; builded too was he Of bigger and more solid bones within, And knit with stalwart sinews through the flesh, Nor easily seized by either heat or cold, Or alien food or any ail or irk. And whilst so many lustrums of the sun Rolled on across the sky, men led a life After the roving habit of wild beasts. Not then were sturdy guiders of curved ploughs, And none knew then to work the fields with iron, Or plant young shoots in holes of delved loam, Or lop with hooked knives from off high trees The boughs of yester-year. What sun and rains To them had given, what earth of own accord Created then, was boon enough to glad Their simple hearts. Mid acorn-laden oaks Would they refresh their bodies for the nonce; And the wild berries of the arbute-tree, Which now thou seest to ripen purple-red In winter time, the old telluric soil Would bear then more abundant and more big. And many coarse foods, too, in long ago The blooming freshness of the rank young world Produced, enough for those poor wretches there. And rivers and springs would summon them of old To slake the thirst, as now from the great hills The water's down-rush calls aloud and far The thirsty generations of the wild. So, too, they sought the grottos of the Nymphs- The woodland haunts discovered as they ranged- From forth of which they knew that gliding rills With gush and splash abounding laved the rocks, The dripping rocks, and trickled from above Over the verdant moss; and here and there Welled up and burst across the open flats. As yet they knew not to enkindle fire Against the cold, nor hairy pelts to use And clothe their bodies with the spoils of beasts; But huddled in groves, and mountain-caves, and woods, And 'mongst the thickets hid their squalid backs, When driven to flee the lashings of the winds And the big rains. Nor could they then regard The general good, nor did they know to use In common any customs, any laws: Whatever of booty fortune unto each Had proffered, each alone would bear away, By instinct trained for self to thrive and live. And Venus in the forests then would link The lovers' bodies; for the woman yielded Either from mutual flame, or from the man's Impetuous fury and insatiate lust, Or from a bribe- as acorn-nuts, choice pears, Or the wild berries of the arbute-tree. And trusting wondrous strength of hands and legs, They'd chase the forest-wanderers, the beasts; And many they'd conquer, but some few they fled, A-skulk into their hiding-places... . . . . . . With the flung stones and with the ponderous heft Of gnarled branch. And by the time of night O'ertaken, they would throw, like bristly boars, Their wildman's limbs naked upon the earth, Rolling themselves in leaves and fronded boughs. Nor would they call with lamentations loud Around the fields for daylight and the sun, Quaking and wand'ring in shadows of the night; But, silent and buried in a sleep, they'd wait Until the sun with rosy flambeau brought The glory to the sky. From childhood wont Ever to see the dark and day begot In times alternate, never might they be Wildered by wild misgiving, lest a night Eternal should possess the lands, with light Of sun withdrawn forever. But their care Was rather that the clans of savage beasts Would often make their sleep-time horrible For those poor wretches; and, from home y-driven, They'd flee their rocky shelters at approach Of boar, the spumy-lipped, or lion strong, And in the midnight yield with terror up To those fierce guests their beds of out-spread leaves.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 300-301, 299 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

299. I tell you things of great utility
2. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.672-4.682 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.672. θῆρες δʼ οὐ θήρεσσιν ἐοικότες ὠμηστῇσιν 4.673. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ ἄνδρεσσιν ὁμὸν δέμας, ἄλλο δʼ ἀπʼ ἄλλων 4.674. συμμιγέες μελέων, κίον ἀθρόοι, ἠύτε μῆλα 4.675. ἐκ σταθμῶν ἅλις εἶσιν ὀπηδεύοντα νομῆι. 4.676. τοίους καὶ προτέρης ἐξ ἰλύος ἐβλάστησε 4.677. χθὼν αὐτὴ μικτοῖσιν ἀρηρεμένους μελέεσσιν 4.678. οὔπω διψαλέῳ μάλʼ ὑπʼ ἠέρι πιληθεῖσα 4.679. οὐδέ πω ἀζαλέοιο βολαῖς τόσον ἠελίοιο 4.680. ἰκμάδας αἰνυμένη· τὰ δʼ ἐπὶ στίχας ἤγαγεν αἰὼν 4.681. συγκρίνας· τὼς οἵγε φυὴν ἀίδηλοι ἕποντο. 4.682. ἥρωας δʼ ἕλε θάμβος ἀπείριτον· αἶψα δʼ ἕκαστος
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.15, 2.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.15. And the fourth and most potent cause of the belief he said was the uniform motion and revolution of the heavens, and the varied groupings and ordered beauty of the sun, moon and stars, the very sight of which was in itself enough to prove that these things are not the mere effect of chance. When a man goes into a house, a wrestling-school or a public assembly and observes in all that goes on arrangement, regularity and system, he cannot possibly suppose that these things come about without a cause: he realizes that there is someone who presides and controls. Far more therefore with the vast movements and phases of the heavenly bodies, and these ordered processes of a multitude of enormous masses of matter, which throughout the countless ages of the infinite past have never in the smallest degree played false, is he compelled to infer that these mighty world-motions are regulated by some Mind. 2.43. moreover the substance employed as food is also believed to have some influence on mental acuteness; it is therefore likely that the stars possess surpassing intelligence, since they inhabit the ethereal region of the world and also are nourished by the moist vapours of sea and earth, rarefied in their passage through the wide intervening space. Again, the consciousness and intelligence of the stars is most clearly evinced by their order and regularity; for regular and rhythmical motion is impossible without design, which contains no trace of casual or accidental variation; now the order and eternal regularity of the constellations indicates neither a process of nature, for it is highly rational, nor chance, for chance loves variation and abhors regularity; it follows therefore that the stars move of their own free-will and because of their intelligence and divinity.
5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.3, 1.76-1.77, 1.102-1.135, 1.159-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.700-2.729, 2.991-2.1022, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1063, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.31-3.33, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.945, 3.970-3.971, 3.1078, 4.26-4.28, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.489-4.495, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 5.82, 5.88-5.90, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.508, 5.665, 5.677-5.679, 5.731-5.750, 5.772-5.825, 5.827-5.1457, 6.1-6.7, 6.25-6.27, 6.33-6.34, 6.36-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.616-6.622, 6.703-6.711, 6.840-6.878, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 1.384 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.384. Broken to the plough, lay their lives on the altar?
8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.416-1.437, 6.395, 8.132, 8.156 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 2.2.12 (1st cent. BCE

10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63, 1.86-1.93, 1.176-1.186, 1.191, 1.197-1.203, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.353, 2.532-2.540 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.86. With shallower trench uptilt it—'twill suffice; 1.87. There, lest weeds choke the crop's luxuriance, here 1.88. Lest the scant moisture fail the barren sand. 1.89. Then thou shalt suffer in alternate year 1.90. The new-reaped fields to rest, and on the plain 1.91. A crust of sloth to harden; or, when star 1.92. Are changed in heaven, there sow the golden grain 1.93. Where erst, luxuriant with its quivering pod 1.176. And hem with hounds the mighty forest-glades. 1.177. Soon one with hand-net scourges the broad stream 1.178. Probing its depths, one drags his dripping toil 1.179. Along the main; then iron's unbending might 1.180. And shrieking saw-blade,—for the men of old 1.181. With wedges wont to cleave the splintering log;— 1.182. Then divers arts arose; toil conquered all 1.183. Remorseless toil, and poverty's shrewd push 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.186. When now the awful groves 'gan fail to bear 1.191. An idler in the fields; the crops die down; 1.197. Prune with thy hook the dark field's matted shade 1.198. Pray down the showers, all vainly thou shalt eye 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath
11. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Juvenal, Satires, 7.197-7.198 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.111 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 77

15. Epicurus, Letters, 87-88, 86

16. Epicurus, Letters, 87-88, 86



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
aetiology of labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animal Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
animals, domesticated Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 241
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
animals, origin and growth of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 241, 245
animals, survival/extinction of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 241
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atomism, atomists Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
aëtius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
bougonia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 241, 245
causation, cause Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
censorinus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
chance Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162
circe Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162, 245; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88, 241
deucalion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
deucalion and pyrrha Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
earth Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162, 241, 245; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 81
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
hybrids Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
infancy/children Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, laws of nature in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203, 204
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
marsyas Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
matter Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
memmius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 241
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
minotaur Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
name (onoma) Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
natural history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
nature Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
plato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
python Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
reproduction, epicurean theory of' Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 175
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
seneca the elder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
spontaneity Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162, 241, 245
stoicism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
temporality Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
terra mater Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 88
time Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 162; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 81
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103