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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.751-5.770


Solis item quoque defectus lunaeque latebrasAs due to several causes. For, indeed, Why should the moon be able to shut out Earth from the light of sun, and on the side To earthward thrust her high head under sun, Opposing dark orb to his glowing beams- And yet, at same time, one suppose the effect Could not result from some one other body Which glides devoid of light forevermore? Again, why could not sun, in weakened state, At fixed time for-lose his fires, and then, When he has passed on along the air Beyond the regions, hostile to his flames, That quench and kill his fires, why could not he Renew his light? And why should earth in turn Have power to rob the moon of light, and there, Herself on high, keep the sun hid beneath, Whilst the moon glideth in her monthly course Through the rigid shadows of the cone?- And yet, at same time, some one other body Not have the power to under-pass the moon, Or glide along above the orb of sun, Breaking his rays and outspread light asunder? And still, if moon herself refulgent be With her own sheen, why could she not at times In some one quarter of the mighty world Grow weak and weary, whilst she passeth through Regions unfriendly to the beams her own? ORIGINS OF VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL LIFE And now to what remains!- Since I've resolved By what arrangements all things come to pass Through the blue regions of the mighty world,- How we can know what energy and cause Started the various courses of the sun And the moon's goings, and by what far means They can succumb, the while with thwarted light, And veil with shade the unsuspecting lands, When, as it were, they blink, and then again With open eye survey all regions wide, Resplendent with white radiance- I do now Return unto the world's primeval age And tell what first the soft young fields of earth With earliest parturition had decreed To raise in air unto the shores of light And to entrust unto the wayward winds. In the beginning, earth gave forth, around The hills and over all the length of plains, The race of grasses and the shining green; The flowery meadows sparkled all aglow With greening colour, and thereafter, lo, Unto the divers kinds of trees was given An emulous impulse mightily to shoot, With a free rein, aloft into the air. As feathers and hairs and bristles are begot The first on members of the four-foot breeds And on the bodies of the strong-y-winged, Thus then the new Earth first of all put forth Grasses and shrubs, and afterward begat The mortal generations, there upsprung- Innumerable in modes innumerable- After diverging fashions. For from sky These breathing-creatures never can have dropped, Nor the land-dwellers ever have come up Out of sea-pools of salt. How true remains, How merited is that adopted name Of earth- "The Mother!"- since from out the earth Are all begotten. And even now arise From out the loams how many living things- Concreted by the rains and heat of the sun. Wherefore 'tis less a marvel, if they sprang In Long Ago more many, and more big, Matured of those days in the fresh young years Of earth and ether. First of all, the race Of the winged ones and parti-coloured birds, Hatched out in spring-time, left their eggs behind; As now-a-days in summer tree-crickets Do leave their shiny husks of own accord, Seeking their food and living. Then it was This earth of thine first gave unto the day The mortal generations; for prevailed Among the fields abounding hot and wet. And hence, where any fitting spot was given, There 'gan to grow womb-cavities, by roots Affixed to earth. And when in ripened time The age of the young within (that sought the air And fled earth's damps) had burst these wombs, O then Would Nature thither turn the pores of earth And make her spurt from open veins a juice Like unto milk; even as a woman now Is filled, at child-bearing, with the sweet milk, Because all that swift stream of aliment Is thither turned unto the mother-breasts. There earth would furnish to the children food; Warmth was their swaddling cloth, the grass their bed Abounding in soft down. Earth's newness then Would rouse no dour spells of the bitter cold, Nor extreme heats nor winds of mighty powers- For all things grow and gather strength through time In like proportions; and then earth was young.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.101 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.101. Saepe etiam et in proeliis Fauni auditi et in rebus turbidis veridicae voces ex occulto missae esse dicuntur; cuius generis duo sint ex multis exempla, sed maxuma: Nam non multo ante urbem captam exaudita vox est a luco Vestae, qui a Palatii radice in novam viam devexus est, ut muri et portae reficerentur; futurum esse, nisi provisum esset, ut Roma caperetur. Quod neglectum tum, cum caveri poterat, post acceptam illam maximam cladem expiatum est; ara enim Aio Loquenti, quam saeptam videmus, exadversus eum locum consecrata est. Atque etiam scriptum a multis est, cum terrae motus factus esset, ut sue plena procuratio fieret, vocem ab aede Iunonis ex arce extitisse; quocirca Iunonem illam appellatam Monetam. Haec igitur et a dis significata et a nostris maioribus iudicata contemnimus? 1.101. Again, we are told that fauns have often been heard in battle and that during turbulent times truly prophetic messages have been sent from mysterious places. Out of many instances of this class I shall give only two, but they are very striking. Not long before the capture of the city by the Gauls, a voice, issuing from Vestas sacred grove, which slopes from the foot of the Palatine Hill to New Road, was heard to say, the walls and gates must be repaired; unless this is done the city will be taken. Neglect of this warning, while it was possible to heed it, was atoned for after the supreme disaster had occurred; for, adjoining the grove, an altar, which is now to be seen enclosed with a hedge, was dedicated to Aius the Speaker. The other illustration has been reported by many writers. At the time of the earthquake a voice came from Junos temple on the citadel commanding that an expiatory sacrifice be made of a pregt sow. From this fact the goddess was called Juno the Adviser. Are we, then, lightly to regard these warnings which the gods have sent and our forefathers adjudged to be trustworthy?
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods.
3. Varro, On The Latin Language, 7.36 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.123, 1.146-1.214, 1.265-1.448, 4.43, 4.580-4.594, 4.759-4.767, 5.22-5.51, 5.78-5.82, 5.181-5.186, 5.218-5.221, 5.737-5.740, 5.752-5.770, 5.1191, 6.48-6.91, 6.129, 6.155, 6.218, 6.247-6.248, 6.288, 6.379-6.422, 6.535-6.607, 6.639-6.702 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Georgics, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.471-1.473, 1.477-1.483 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line
6. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.31-10.34, 10.63 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.31. They reject dialectic as superfluous; holding that in their inquiries the physicists should be content to employ the ordinary terms for things. Now in The Canon Epicurus affirms that our sensations and preconceptions and our feelings are the standards of truth; the Epicureans generally make perceptions of mental presentations to be also standards. His own statements are also to be found in the Summary addressed to Herodotus and in the Sovran Maxims. Every sensation, he says, is devoid of reason and incapable of memory; for neither is it self-caused nor, regarded as having an external cause, can it add anything thereto or take anything therefrom. 10.32. Nor is there anything which can refute sensations or convict them of error: one sensation cannot convict another and kindred sensation, for they are equally valid; nor can one sensation refute another which is not kindred but heterogeneous, for the objects which the two senses judge are not the same; nor again can reason refute them, for reason is wholly dependent on sensation; nor can one sense refute another, since we pay equal heed to all. And the reality of separate perceptions guarantees the truth of our senses. But seeing and hearing are just as real as feeling pain. Hence it is from plain facts that we must start when we draw inferences about the unknown. For all our notions are derived from perceptions, either by actual contact or by analogy, or resemblance, or composition, with some slight aid from reasoning. And the objects presented to mad-men and to people in dreams are true, for they produce effects – i.e. movements in the mind – which that which is unreal never does. 10.33. By preconception they mean a sort of apprehension or a right opinion or notion, or universal idea stored in the mind; that is, a recollection of an external object often presented, e.g. Such and such a thing is a man: for no sooner is the word man uttered than we think of his shape by an act of preconception, in which the senses take the lead. Thus the object primarily denoted by every term is then plain and clear. And we should never have started an investigation, unless we had known what it was that we were in search of. For example: The object standing yonder is a horse or a cow. Before making this judgement, we must at some time or other have known by preconception the shape of a horse or a cow. We should not have given anything a name, if we had not first learnt its form by way of preconception. It follows, then, that preconceptions are clear. The object of a judgement is derived from something previously clear, by reference to which we frame the proposition, e.g. How do we know that this is a man? 10.34. Opinion they also call conception or assumption, and declare it to be true and false; for it is true if it is subsequently confirmed or if it is not contradicted by evidence, and false if it is not subsequently confirmed or is contradicted by evidence. Hence the introduction of the phrase, that which awaits confirmation, e.g. to wait and get close to the tower and then learn what it looks like at close quarters.They affirm that there are two states of feeling, pleasure and pain, which arise in every animate being, and that the one is favourable and the other hostile to that being, and by their means choice and avoidance are determined; and that there are two kinds of inquiry, the one concerned with things, the other with nothing but words. So much, then, for his division and criterion in their main outline.But we must return to the letter.Epicurus to Herodotus, greeting. 10.63. Next, keeping in view our perceptions and feelings (for so shall we have the surest grounds for belief), we must recognize generally that the soul is a corporeal thing, composed of fine particles, dispersed all over the frame, most nearly resembling wind with an admixture of heat, in some respects like wind, in others like heat. But, again, there is the third part which exceeds the other two in the fineness of its particles and thereby keeps in closer touch with the rest of the frame. And this is shown by the mental faculties and feelings, by the ease with which the mind moves, and by thoughts, and by all those things the loss of which causes death.
7. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
anaxagoras Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
aristotle, on perception and knowledge Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
atoms, andoid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
atoms, nature/properties of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 82
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
demetrius laco Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82
earth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
etna Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
etruria Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
hercules Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
hume, david Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
makarismos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
meteorology, clouds Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 96
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
moon Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82, 96
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
nymphs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
pan Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
parmenides Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 82
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
philippi Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
polyphony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
recusatio Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
romulus and remus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
sabines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
silvanus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
truth' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 42