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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.490-5.491
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.102-1.135, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.600-2.643, 2.645, 2.1001, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.18-3.22, 3.371, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 5.111-5.112, 5.235-5.489, 5.491-5.508, 5.622, 5.772-5.1457, 6.1-6.6, 6.76, 6.286, 6.388, 6.644, 6.670, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 1.105-1.110, 1.113-1.114, 1.133-1.144, 1.255-1.276, 1.317-1.334 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.105. The clear air, and the three other elements 1.106. Fire, water, earth, were heaped together as one. 1.107. When, through the discord of its components 1.108. The mass dissolved, and scattered to new regions 1.109. Flame found the heights: air took a lower place 1.110. While earth and sea sank to the furthest depth. 1.113. Even now, a small sign of my once confused state 1.114. My front and back appear just the same. 1.135. Every doorway has two sides, this way and that 1.136. One facing the crowds, and the other the Lares: 1.141. You see Hecate’s faces turned in three directions 1.260. He at once retold the warlike acts of Oebalian Tatius 1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel. 1.317. Add four successive days to the Nones and Janu 1.318. Must be propitiated on the Agonal day. 1.319. The day may take its name from the girded priest 1.320. At whose blow the god’s sacrifice is felled: 1.321. Always, before he stains the naked blade with hot blood 1.322. He asks if he should (agatne), and won’t unless commanded. 1.323. Some believe that the day is called Agonal because 1.324. The sheep do not come to the altar but are driven (agantur). 1.325. Others think the ancients called this festival Agnalia 1.326. ‘of the lambs’, dropping a letter from its usual place. 1.327. Or because the victim fears the knife mirrored in the water 1.328. The day might be so called from the creature’s agony? 1.329. It may also be that the day has a Greek name 1.330. From the games (agones) that were held in former times. 1.331. And in ancient speech agonia meant a sheep 1.332. And this last reason in my judgement is the truth. 1.333. Though the meaning is uncertain, the king of the rites 1.334. Must appease the gods with the mate of a woolly ewe.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
callimachus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
disease, as a paradoxical phenomenon / experience Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
disease, at the crossroads between medicine and paradoxography Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epilepsy, and its persisting marvelous properties Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
epilepsy Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
etymology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
female, feminization of the earth Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
female, the female body as intrinsically strange Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
four elements theory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
janus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
menstruation / menstrual blood Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
metamorphoses, ardea Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
metamorphoses, memnon and the memnonides Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
metamorphoses, phaethon Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
metamorphoses, pythagoras Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
nugent, georgia Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
papaioannou, sophia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
paradoxography Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
phaethon Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
phoenix Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 240
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
sabines Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
sacrifice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
stars Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 116
strife Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
tarpeia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 235
templum' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22