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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.1376-5.1378
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 12-20, 202-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-229, 23, 230-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-292, 336-337, 11 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

11. Not one, but two Strifes live on earth: when these
2. Xenophon, On Household Management, 4.21 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.21. Now Lysander admired the beauty of the trees in it, the accuracy of the spacing, the straightness of the rows, the regularity of the angles and the multitude of the sweet scents that clung round them as they walked; and for wonder of these things he cried, Cyrus , I really do admire all these lovely things, but I am far more impressed with your agent’s skill in measuring and arranging everything so exactly.
3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.445 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.445. σχέτλιʼ Ἔρως, μέγα πῆμα, μέγα στύγος ἀνθρώποισιν
4. Cicero, On Old Age, 59 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.4.1-1.4.2, 1.40.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Ars Poetica, 392-393, 391 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.14-1.15, 1.28, 1.32, 1.67, 1.71, 1.80-1.135, 1.159-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.926-1.950, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.5-2.6, 2.48-2.52, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.123-2.124, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.594-2.595, 2.992-2.997, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.1-3.2, 3.9, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 3.1036, 4.2-4.3, 4.11-4.25, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 5.9-5.12, 5.14-5.21, 5.165-5.173, 5.186, 5.195-5.508, 5.772-5.1375, 5.1377-5.1457, 6.1-6.7, 6.26-6.27, 6.33-6.34, 6.36-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.412 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.412. but carefully dissembling what emprise
9. Vergil, Georgics, 1.118-1.159, 1.316-1.334, 1.351-1.355, 1.464-1.514, 2.9-2.82, 2.136-2.176, 2.207-2.211, 2.278, 2.325-2.328, 2.345, 2.460, 2.500-2.501, 2.524-2.525, 3.219-3.241, 4.176, 4.510 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.118. Hales o'er them; from the far Olympian height 1.119. Him golden Ceres not in vain regards; 1.120. And he, who having ploughed the fallow plain 1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.147. But no whit the more 1.148. For all expedients tried and travail borne 1.149. By man and beast in turning oft the soil 1.150. Do greedy goose and Strymon-haunting crane 1.151. And succory's bitter fibres cease to harm 1.152. Or shade not injure. The great Sire himself 1.153. No easy road to husbandry assigned 1.154. And first was he by human skill to rouse 1.155. The slumbering glebe, whetting the minds of men 1.156. With care on care, nor suffering realm of hi 1.157. In drowsy sloth to stagnate. Before Jove 1.158. Fields knew no taming hand of husbandmen; 1.159. To mark the plain or mete with boundary-line— 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.352. And those sworn brethren banded to break down 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.355. Aye, and on Ossa to up-roll amain 1.464. From heaven shoot headlong, and through murky night 1.465. Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.467. Or feathers on the wave-top float and play. 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.469. It lightens, and when thunder fills the hall 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.474. Or, as it rises, the high-soaring crane 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.476. Upturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.484. Clamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see 1.485. The various ocean-fowl and those that pry 1.486. Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry 1.488. About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 1.490. Into the billows, for sheer idle joy 1.491. of their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow 1.492. With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise 1.503. Nor fleecy films to float along the sky. 1.504. Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore 1.505. Do halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 1.509. And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught 1.510. Watching the sunset plies her 'lated song. 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 2.9. Hither, O Father of the wine-press, come 2.10. And stripped of buskin stain thy bared limb 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.12. First, nature's law 2.13. For generating trees is manifold; 2.14. For some of their own force spontaneous spring 2.15. No hand of man compelling, and posse 2.16. The plains and river-windings far and wide 2.17. As pliant osier and the bending broom 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.22. Jove's Aesculus, and oaks, oracular 2.23. Deemed by the Greeks of old. With some sprouts forth 2.24. A forest of dense suckers from the root 2.25. As elms and cherries; so, too, a pigmy plant 2.26. Beneath its mother's mighty shade upshoot 2.27. The bay-tree of placeName key= 2.28. Nature imparted first; hence all the race 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.30. Springs into verdure. Other means there are 2.31. Which use by method for itself acquired. 2.32. One, sliving suckers from the tender frame 2.33. of the tree-mother, plants them in the trench; 2.34. One buries the bare stumps within his field 2.35. Truncheons cleft four-wise, or sharp-pointed stakes; 2.36. Some forest-trees the layer's bent arch await 2.37. And slips yet quick within the parent-soil; 2.38. No root need others, nor doth the pruner's hand 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.47. Come then, and learn what tilth to each belong 2.48. According to their kinds, ye husbandmen 2.49. And tame with culture the wild fruits, lest earth 2.50. Lie idle. O blithe to make all Ismaru 2.51. One forest of the wine-god, and to clothe 2.52. With olives huge Tabernus! And be thou 2.53. At hand, and with me ply the voyage of toil 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.57. Spread sail like wings to waft thee. Not that I 2.58. With my poor verse would comprehend the whole 2.59. Nay, though a hundred tongues, a hundred mouth 2.60. Were mine, a voice of iron; be thou at hand 2.61. Skirt but the nearer coast-line; see the shore 2.62. Is in our grasp; not now with feigned song 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.65. Those that lift their head 2.66. Into the realms of light spontaneously 2.67. Fruitless indeed, but blithe and strenuous spring 2.68. Since Nature lurks within the soil. And yet 2.69. Even these, should one engraft them, or transplant 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.71. Their woodland temper, and, by frequent tilth 2.72. To whatso craft thou summon them, make speed 2.73. To follow. So likewise will the barren shaft 2.74. That from the stock-root issueth, if it be 2.75. Set out with clear space amid open fields: 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.77. Darken, despoil of increase as it grows 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.79. Which from shed seed ariseth, upward win 2.80. But slowly, yielding promise of its shade 2.81. To late-born generations; apples wane 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.207. Or sing her harbours, and the barrier cast 2.208. Athwart the Lucrine, and how ocean chafe 2.209. With mighty bellowings, where the Julian wave 2.210. Echoes the thunder of his rout, and through 2.211. Avernian inlets pours the Tuscan tide? 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 3.219. But if fierce squadrons and the ranks of war 3.220. Delight thee rather, or on wheels to glide 3.221. At placeName key= 3.222. And in the grove of Jupiter urge on 3.223. The flying chariot, be your steed's first task 3.224. To face the warrior's armed rage, and brook 3.225. The trumpet, and long roar of rumbling wheels 3.226. And clink of chiming bridles in the stall; 3.227. Then more and more to love his master's voice 3.228. Caressing, or loud hand that claps his neck. 3.229. Ay, thus far let him learn to dare, when first 3.230. Weaned from his mother, and his mouth at time 3.231. Yield to the supple halter, even while yet 3.232. Weak, tottering-limbed, and ignorant of life. 3.233. But, three years ended, when the fourth arrives 3.234. Now let him tarry not to run the ring 3.235. With rhythmic hoof-beat echoing, and now learn 3.236. Alternately to curve each bending leg 3.237. And be like one that struggleth; then at last 3.238. Challenge the winds to race him, and at speed 3.239. Launched through the open, like a reinless thing 3.240. Scarce print his footsteps on the surface-sand. 3.241. As when with power from Hyperborean clime 4.176. Plucking the rathe faint hyacinth, while he chid 4.510. With rigorous force and fetters; against these
10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.1.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.1.6. But he introduced as food the nuts of trees, not those of all trees but only the acorns of the edible oak. Some people have followed this diet so closely since the time of Pelasgus that even the Pythian priestess, when she forbade the Lacedaemonians to touch the land of the Arcadians, uttered the following verses:— In Arcadia are many men who eat acorns, Who will prevent you; though I do not grudge it you. It is said that it was in the reign of Pelasgus that the land was called Pelasgia.
12. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 4.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.2. 2.But we shall begin from the abstinence of certain nations, in the narration of which, what is asserted of the Greeks will first claim our attention, as being the most allied to us, and the most appropriate of all the witnesses that can be adduced. Among those, therefore, that have concisely, and at the same time accurately collected an account of the affairs of the Greeks, is the Peripatetic Dicaearchus 1, who, in narrating the pristine life of the Greeks, says, the ancients, being generated with an alliance to the Gods, were naturally most excellent, and led the best life; so that, when compared to us of the present day, who consist of an adulterated and most vile matter, they were thought to be a golden race; and they slew no animal whatever. The truth of this, he also says, is testified by the poets, who denominate these ancients the golden race, and assert that every good was present with them. The fertile earth for them spontaneous bore of fruits a copious and unenvy'd store; In blissful quiet then, unknown to strife, The worthy with the worthy passed their life 2. |111 Which assertions, indeed Dicaearchus explaining, says, that a life of this kind was under Saturn; if it is proper to consider it as a thing that once existed, and that it is a life which has not been celebrated in vain, and if, laying aside what is extremely fabulous, we may refer it to a physical narration. All things, therefore, are very properly said to have been then spontaneously produced; for men did not procure any thing by labour, because they were unacquainted with the agricultural art, and, in short, had no knowledge of any other art. This very thing, likewise, was the cause of their leading a life of leisure, free from labours and care; and if it is proper to assent to the decision of the most skilful and elegant of physicians, it was also the cause of their being liberated from disease. For there is not any precept of physicians which more contributes to health, than that which exhorts us not to make an abundance of excrement, from which those pristine Greeks always preserved their bodies pure. For they neither assumed such food as was stronger than the nature of the body could bear, but such as could be vanquished by the corporeal nature, nor more than was moderate, on account of the facility of procuring it, but for the most part less than was sufficient, on account of its paucity. Moreover, there were neither any wars among them, nor seditions with each other. For no reward of contention worth mentioning was proposed as an incentive, for the sake of which some one might be induced to engage in such dissensions. So that the principal thing in that life was leisure and rest from necessary occupations, together with health, peace, and friendship. But to those in after times, who, through aspiring after things which greatly exceeded mediocrity, fell into many evils, this pristine life became, as it was reasonable to suppose it would, desirable. The slender and extemporaneous food, however, of these first men, is manifested by the saying which was afterwards proverbially used, enough of the oak; this adage being probably introduced by him who first changed the ancient mode of living. A pastoral life succeeded to this, in which men procured for themselves superfluous possessions, and meddled with animals. For, perceiving that some of them were innoxious, but others malefic and savage, they tamed the former, but attacked the latter. At the same time, together with this life, war was introduced. And these things, says Dicaearchus, are not asserted by us, but by those who have historically discussed a multitude of particulars. For, as possessions were now of such a magnitude as to merit attention, some ambitiously endeavoured to obtain them, by collecting them [for their own use], and calling on others to do the same, but others directed their attention to the preservation of them when collected. Time, therefore, thus gradually proceeding, and men always directing their attention to what |112 appeared to be useful, they at length became conversant with the third, and agricultural form of life. And this is what is said by Dicaearchus, in his narration of the manners of the ancient Greeks, and the blessed life which they then led, to which abstinence from animal food contributed, no less than other things. Hence, at that period there was no war, because injustice was exterminated. But afterwards, together with injustice towards animals, war was introduced among men, and the endeavour to surpass each other in amplitude of possessions. On which account also, the audacity of those is wonderful, who say that abstinence from animals is the mother of injustice, since both history and experience testify, that together with the slaughter of animals, war and injustice were introduced. SPAN


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology of labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66
agriculture Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
allegory Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals, asictims Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
animals, domesticated Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 186
ars vivendi, conjectural Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 85
art (τέχνη) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 85
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
beehive, as paradigm for human society Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 259
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 259
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 43
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 259
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
columella Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 212, 259
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
culture history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
damoxenus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
democritus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
disposition (διάθεσις) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 85
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
empedocles Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 30
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
epicureans, as chefs Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
epicureans, language of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
eris Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fear, personified Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
galen Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 63, 66
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66, 80, 210
grafting Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 212
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
greek terms, καταπυκνόω Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
hercules Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 210
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
homer Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
horace Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 80
imagery, agricultural Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 259
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66; Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
iphigenia/iphianassa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 63, 66, 210
justice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 43
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186, 259
labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 63, 66, 80, 209, 210
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 63, 66, 210
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 259
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
mars Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66, 209, 210
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
new comedy Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
orpheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186, 212
perses Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
pliny Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 212
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 30
sacrifice' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
stoicism, sun, the size of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 26
stoicism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 66
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
teachers/teaching Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 85
theophrastus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 210, 212
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186, 209, 210, 212
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 212
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 210; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 259
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 186
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 63, 66
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 80, 259
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 259
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 259
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 259
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 259
weather signs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43