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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.1289-5.1296
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 128, 143-151, 202-292, 336-337, 61, 639-640, 109 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

109. Filling both land and sea, while every day
2. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 9.42-9.46 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 109, 108 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

108. οὔπω λευγαλέου τότε νείκεος ἠπίσταντο
4. Theocritus, Idylls, 1.123-1.124 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On Duties, 1.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.42. Deinceps, ut erat propositum, de beneficentia ae de liberalitate dicatur, qua quidem nihil est naturae hominis accommodatius, sed habet multas cautiones. Videndum est enim, primum ne obsit benignitas et iis ipsis, quibus benigne videbitur fieri et ceteris, deinde ne maior benignitas sit quam facultates, tum ut pro dignitate cuique tribuatur; id enim est iustitiae fundamentum, ad quam haec referenda sunt omnia. Nam et qui gratificantur cuipiam, quod obsit illi, cui prodesse velle videantur, non benefici neque liberales, sed perniciosi assentatores iudicandi sunt, et qui aliis nocent, ut in alios liberales sint, in eadem sunt iniustitia, ut si in suam rem aliena convertant. 1.42.  Next in order, as outlined above, let us speak of kindness and generosity. Nothing appeals more to the best in human nature than this, but it calls for the exercise of caution in many particulars; we must, in the first place, see to it that our act of kindness shall not prove an injury either to the object of our beneficence or to others; in the second place, that it shall not be beyond our means; and finally, that it shall be proportioned to the worthiness of the recipient; for this is the corner-stone of justice; and by the standard of justice all acts of kindness must be measured. For those who confer a harmful favour upon someone whom they seemingly wish to help are to be accounted not generous benefactors but dangerous sycophants; and likewise those who injure one man, in order to be generous to another, are guilty of the same injustice as if they diverted to their own accounts the property of their neighbours.
6. Philodemus, De Oeconomia, 9.32-9.38, 23.3-23.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Varro, On Agriculture, 2.10.1, 3.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.14, 1.32, 1.62-1.135, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.926-1.950, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.5-2.6, 2.47-2.54, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.594-2.595, 2.621, 2.629-2.630, 2.992-2.997, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.9, 3.59-3.78, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.654-3.656, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.580-4.594, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 4.967-4.968, 4.1013-4.1015, 5.10, 5.43-5.51, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.508, 5.772-5.1288, 5.1290-5.1457, 6.1-6.7, 6.26-6.27, 6.33-6.34, 6.36-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.23, 1.118-1.146, 1.155, 1.160, 1.168, 1.270, 1.273-1.275, 1.351-1.355, 1.464-1.514, 2.114, 2.136-2.176, 2.490-2.494, 2.496, 3.1-3.48, 3.339-3.348 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.6. Such are my themes. O universal light 1.7. Most glorious! ye that lead the gliding year 1.8. Along the sky, Liber and Ceres mild 1.9. If by your bounty holpen earth once changed 1.10. Chaonian acorn for the plump wheat-ear 1.11. And mingled with the grape, your new-found gift 1.12. The draughts of Achelous; and ye Faun 1.13. To rustics ever kind, come foot it, Faun 1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.16. Sprang from earth's womb at thy great trident's stroke 1.17. Neptune; and haunter of the groves, for whom 1.18. Three hundred snow-white heifers browse the brakes 1.19. The fertile brakes of placeName key= 1.20. Thy native forest and Lycean lawns 1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.118. Hales o'er them; from the far Olympian height 1.119. Him golden Ceres not in vain regards; 1.120. And he, who having ploughed the fallow plain 1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.155. The slumbering glebe, whetting the minds of men 1.160. Even this was impious; for the common stock 1.168. Might forge the various arts, with furrow's help 1.270. Aye, more than time to bend above the plough 1.273. Thee, too, Lucerne, the crumbling furrows then 1.274. Receive, and millet's annual care returns 1.275. What time the white bull with his gilded horn 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.352. And those sworn brethren banded to break down 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.355. Aye, and on Ossa to up-roll amain 1.464. From heaven shoot headlong, and through murky night 1.465. Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.467. Or feathers on the wave-top float and play. 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.469. It lightens, and when thunder fills the hall 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.474. Or, as it rises, the high-soaring crane 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.476. Upturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.484. Clamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see 1.485. The various ocean-fowl and those that pry 1.486. Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry 1.488. About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 1.490. Into the billows, for sheer idle joy 1.491. of their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow 1.492. With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise 1.503. Nor fleecy films to float along the sky. 1.504. Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore 1.505. Do halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 1.509. And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught 1.510. Watching the sunset plies her 'lated song. 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 2.114. Fat olives, orchades, and radii 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.339. Not toward thy rising, Eurus, or the sun's 3.340. But westward and north-west, or whence up-spring 3.341. Black Auster, that glooms heaven with rainy cold. 3.342. Hence from their groin slow drips a poisonous juice 3.343. By shepherds truly named hippomanes 3.344. Hippomanes, fell stepdames oft have culled 3.345. And mixed with herbs and spells of baneful bode. 3.346. Fast flies meanwhile the irreparable hour 3.347. As point to point our charmed round we trace. 3.348. Enough of herds. This second task remains
10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.2, 10.10, 10.118, 10.120 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.2. For some time he stayed there and gathered disciples, but returned to Athens in the archonship of Anaxicrates. And for a while, it is said, he prosecuted his studies in common with the other philosophers, but afterwards put forward independent views by the foundation of the school called after him. He says himself that he first came into contact with philosophy at the age of fourteen. Apollodorus the Epicurean, in the first book of his Life of Epicurus, says that he turned to philosophy in disgust at the schoolmasters who could not tell him the meaning of chaos in Hesiod. According to Hermippus, however, he started as a schoolmaster, but on coming across the works of Democritus turned eagerly to philosophy. 10.10. his gratitude to his parents, his generosity to his brothers, his gentleness to his servants, as evidenced by the terms of his will and by the fact that they were members of the School, the most eminent of them being the aforesaid Mys; and in general, his benevolence to all mankind. His piety towards the gods and his affection for his country no words can describe. He carried deference to others to such excess that he did not even enter public life. He spent all his life in Greece, notwithstanding the calamities which had befallen her in that age; when he did once or twice take a trip to Ionia, it was to visit his friends there. Friends indeed came to him from all parts and lived with him in his garden. 10.118. When on the rack, however, he will give vent to cries and groans. As regards women he will submit to the restrictions imposed by the law, as Diogenes says in his epitome of Epicurus' ethical doctrines. Nor will he punish his servants; rather he will pity them and make allowance on occasion for those who are of good character. The Epicureans do not suffer the wise man to fall in love; nor will he trouble himself about funeral rites; according to them love does not come by divine inspiration: so Diogenes in his twelfth book. The wise man will not make fine speeches. No one was ever the better for sexual indulgence, and it is well if he be not the worse.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
agriculture Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals, asictims Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
animals, domesticated Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
ars vivendi Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
art (τέχνη) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 43
birds Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cereal crops Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
children Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
civil war Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
columella Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
culture history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death/dying Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
discordia (as civil war) Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
empedocles Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 54; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
ensis (as signifier of civil war) Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 50, 51, 52, 53, 56
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 30
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30, 239, 245
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fauns Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
fear, personified Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 245, 249, 255
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
germanicus Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30, 33
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
golden age Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 52
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
hesiod, myth of the races in Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
hesiod Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 52; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
homer Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
imagery, agricultural Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 245, 249
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245, 255
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
iphigenia/iphianassa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
irascibility Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
justice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 43
labor/toil Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
leisure Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
liber Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
literacy Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, account of early man Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 45
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30, 32, 33, 239, 249
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239, 245
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 239, 249
lucretius Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87, 249
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
makarismos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
mars Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
minerva Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
mining Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
music Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
nymphs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30, 32, 245
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
pan Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
perses Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pietas Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 54, 55
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
pity Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
pleasure Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
poetry Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245, 249
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239, 245
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
polyphony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
preconception (πρόληψις) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 239
profit Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
punishment Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
roman aristocrats Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28, 30
sacrifice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
safety Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
silvanus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
slaves/servants Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
spontaneity' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
teachers/teaching Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
theophrastus Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
tranquility (ἀταραξία) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
triptolemus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 30
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 28
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 255
violence Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 245, 249, 255
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33, 245, 249, 255
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 239, 249
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 32, 33, 245, 249, 255
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 245
war, punic wars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, trojan war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
wealth Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 87
wealthy epicureans Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
weather signs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 33
xenophon Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 249
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43