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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.1161-5.1240


Nunc quae causa deum per magnas numina gentisAnd now what cause Hath spread divinities of gods abroad Through mighty nations, and filled the cities full Of the high altars, and led to practices Of solemn rites in season- rites which still Flourish in midst of great affairs of state And midst great centres of man's civic life, The rites whence still a poor mortality Is grafted that quaking awe which rears aloft Still the new temples of gods from land to land And drives mankind to visit them in throngs On holy days- 'tis not so hard to give Reason thereof in speech. Because, in sooth, Even in those days would the race of man Be seeing excelling visages of gods With mind awake; and in his sleeps, yet more- Bodies of wondrous growth. And, thus, to these Would men attribute sense, because they seemed To move their limbs and speak pronouncements high, Befitting glorious visage and vast powers. And men would give them an eternal life, Because their visages forevermore Were there before them, and their shapes remained, And chiefly, however, because men would not think Beings augmented with such mighty powers Could well by any force o'ermastered be. And men would think them in their happiness Excelling far, because the fear of death Vexed no one of them at all, and since At same time in men's sleeps men saw them do So many wonders, and yet feel therefrom Themselves no weariness. Besides, men marked How in a fixed order rolled around The systems of the sky, and changed times Of annual seasons, nor were able then To know thereof the causes. Therefore 'twas Men would take refuge in consigning all Unto divinities, and in feigning all Was guided by their nod. And in the sky They set the seats and vaults of gods, because Across the sky night and the moon are seen To roll along- moon, day, and night, and night's Old awesome constellations evermore, And the night-wandering fireballs of the sky, And flying flames, clouds, and the sun, the rains, Snow and the winds, the lightnings, and the hail, And the swift rumblings, and the hollow roar Of mighty menacings forevermore.
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O genus infelix humanum, talia divisO humankind unhappy!- when it ascribed Unto divinities such awesome deeds, And coupled thereto rigours of fierce wrath! What groans did men on that sad day beget Even for themselves, and O what wounds for us, What tears for our children's children! Nor, O man, Is thy true piety in this: with head Under the veil, still to be seen to turn Fronting a stone, and ever to approach Unto all altars; nor so prone on earth Forward to fall, to spread upturned palms Before the shrines of gods, nor yet to dew Altars with profuse blood of four-foot beasts, Nor vows with vows to link. But rather this: To look on all things with a master eye And mind at peace. For when we gaze aloft Upon the skiey vaults of yon great world And ether, fixed high o'er twinkling stars, And into our thought there come the journeyings Of sun and moon, O then into our breasts, O'erburdened already with their other ills, Begins forthwith to rear its sudden head One more misgiving: lest o'er us, percase, It be the gods' immeasurable power That rolls, with varied motion, round and round The far white constellations. For the lack Of aught of reasons tries the puzzled mind: Whether was ever a birth-time of the world, And whether, likewise, any end shall be How far the ramparts of the world can still Outstand this strain of ever-roused motion, Or whether, divinely with eternal weal Endowed, they can through endless tracts of age Glide on, defying the o'er-mighty powers Of the immeasurable ages. Lo, What man is there whose mind with dread of gods Cringes not close, whose limbs with terror-spell Crouch not together, when the parched earth Quakes with the horrible thunderbolt amain, And across the mighty sky the rumblings run? Do not the peoples and the nations shake, And haughty kings do they not hug their limbs, Strook through with fear of the divinities, Lest for aught foully done or madly said The heavy time be now at hand to pay? When, too, fierce force of fury-winds at sea Sweepeth a navy's admiral down the main With his stout legions and his elephants, Doth he not seek the peace of gods with vows, And beg in prayer, a-tremble, lulled winds And friendly gales?- in vain, since, often up-caught In fury-cyclones, is he borne along, For all his mouthings, to the shoals of doom. Ah, so irrevocably some hidden power Betramples forevermore affairs of men, And visibly grindeth with its heel in mire The lictors' glorious rods and axes dire, Having them in derision! Again, when earth From end to end is rocking under foot, And shaken cities ruin down, or threaten Upon the verge, what wonder is it then That mortal generations abase themselves, And unto gods in all affairs of earth Assign as last resort almighty powers And wondrous energies to govern all?
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 151, 150 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

150. They liked fell warfare and audacity;
2. Cicero, On Laws, 2.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.43-1.45, 1.49-1.50 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.43. With the errors of the poets may be classed the monstrous doctrines of the magi and the insane mythology of Egypt, and also the popular beliefs, which are a mere mass of inconsistencies sprung from ignorance. "Anyone pondering on the baseless and irrational character of these doctrines ought to regard Epicurus with reverence, and to rank him as one of the very gods about whom we are inquiring. For he alone perceived, first, that the gods exist, because nature herself has imprinted a conception of them on the minds of all mankind. For what nation or what tribe is there but possesses untaught some 'preconception' of the gods? Such notions Epicurus designates by the word prolepsis, that is, a sort of preconceived mental picture of a thing, without which nothing can be understood or investigated or discussed. The force and value of this argument we learn in that work of genius, Epicurus's Rule or Standard of Judgement. 1.44. You see therefore that the foundation (for such it is) of our inquiry has been well and truly laid. For the belief in the gods has not been established by authority, custom or law, but rests on the uimous and abiding consensus of mankind; their existence is therefore a necessary inference, since we possess an instinctive or rather an innate concept of them; but a belief which all men by nature share must necessarily be true; therefore it must be admitted that the gods exist. And since this truth is almost universally accepted not only among philosophers but also among the unlearned, we must admit it as also being an accepted truth that we possess a 'preconception,' as I called it above, or 'prior notion,' of the gods. (For we are bound to employ novel terms to denote novel ideas, just as Epicurus himself employed the word prolepsis in a sense in which no one had ever used it before.) 1.45. We have then a preconception of such a nature that we believe the gods to be blessed and immortal. For nature, which bestowed upon us an idea of the gods themselves, also engraved on our minds the belief that they are eternal and blessed. If this is so, the famous maxim of Epicurus truthfully enunciates that 'that which is blessed and eternal can neither know trouble itself nor cause trouble to another, and accordingly cannot feel either anger or favour, since all such things belong only to the weak.' "If we sought to attain nothing else beside piety in worshipping the gods and freedom from superstition, what has been said had sufficed; since the exalted nature of the gods, being both eternal and supremely blessed, would receive man's pious worship (for what is highest commands the reverence that is its due); and furthermore all fear of the divine power or divine anger would have been banished (since it is understood that anger and favour alike are excluded from the nature of a being at once blessed and immortal, and that these being eliminated we are menaced by no fears in regard to the powers above). But the mind strives to strengthen this belief by trying to discover the form of god, the mode of his activity, and the operation of his intelligence. 1.49. Yet their form is not corporeal, but only resembles bodily substance; it does not contain blood, but the semblance of blood. "These discoveries of Epicurus are so acute in themselves and so subtly expressed that not everyone would be capable of appreciating them. Still I may rely on your intelligence, and make my exposition briefer than the subject demands. Epicurus then, as he not merely discerns abstruse and recondite things with his mind's eye, but handles them as tangible realities, teaches that the substance and nature of the gods is such that, in the first place, it is perceived not by the senses but by the mind, and not materially or individually, like the solid objects which Epicurus in virtue of their substantiality entitles steremnia; but by our perceiving images owing to their similarity and succession, because an endless train of precisely similar images arises from the innumerable atoms and streams towards the gods, our minds with the keenest feelings of pleasure fixes its gaze on these images, and so attains an understanding of the nature of a being both blessed and eternal. 1.50. Moreover there is the supremely potent principle of infinity, which claims the closest and most careful study; we must understand that it has the following property, that in the sum of things everything has its exact match and counterpart. This property is termed by Epicurus isonomia, or the principle of uniform distribution. From this principle it follows that if the whole number of mortals be so many, there must exist no less a number of immortals, and if the causes of destruction are beyond count, the causes of conservation also are bound to be infinite. "You Stoics are also fond of asking us, Balbus, what is the mode of life of the gods and how they pass their days.
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.79, 1.102-1.135, 1.155, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.622-2.623, 2.651, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.18, 3.28-3.30, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 3.978-3.1023, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.52-4.53, 4.59, 4.64, 4.84, 4.123, 4.130, 4.333, 4.580-4.594, 4.731, 4.733-4.734, 4.737-4.739, 4.760-4.761, 4.1032, 4.1233, 4.1239, 5.1-5.12, 5.82-5.90, 5.110-5.125, 5.147-5.148, 5.150-5.152, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.508, 5.557, 5.561, 5.772-5.1160, 5.1162-5.1457, 6.1-6.7, 6.26-6.27, 6.33-6.34, 6.36-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.522, 6.654, 6.1056, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.216 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.5, 10.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.5. Furthermore that he extolled Idomeneus, Herodotus, and Timocrates, who had published his esoteric doctrines, and flattered them for that very reason. Also that in his letters he wrote to Leontion, O Lord Apollo, my dear little Leontion, with what tumultuous applause we were inspired as we read your letter. Then again to Themista, the wife of Leonteus: I am quite ready, if you do not come to see me, to spin thrice on my own axis and be propelled to any place that you, including Themista, agree upon; and to the beautiful Pythocles he writes: I will sit down and await thy divine advent, my heart's desire. And, as Theodorus says in the fourth book of his work, Against Epicurus, in another letter to Themista he thinks he preaches to her. 10.33. By preconception they mean a sort of apprehension or a right opinion or notion, or universal idea stored in the mind; that is, a recollection of an external object often presented, e.g. Such and such a thing is a man: for no sooner is the word man uttered than we think of his shape by an act of preconception, in which the senses take the lead. Thus the object primarily denoted by every term is then plain and clear. And we should never have started an investigation, unless we had known what it was that we were in search of. For example: The object standing yonder is a horse or a cow. Before making this judgement, we must at some time or other have known by preconception the shape of a horse or a cow. We should not have given anything a name, if we had not first learnt its form by way of preconception. It follows, then, that preconceptions are clear. The object of a judgement is derived from something previously clear, by reference to which we frame the proposition, e.g. How do we know that this is a man?
8. Epicurus, On Nature, 12

9. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 128-129, 132-135, 123

10. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 82

11. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 15



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action, and cult Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 235
action, in pursuit of pleasure Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
aetiology Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 235
agency, celestial Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
anger, wrath, divine Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
animal Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
anthropomorphization Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
apostle, paul Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
belief, empty Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
belief, false Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
belief, in gods/goddesses Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 235
belief, in pursuit of pleasure Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
belief, religious Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 218, 235
belief, theological Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218, 235
body, blood Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
body, breast Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
body, head Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, palm Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
body-environment approach (bea), in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
body-environment approach (bea) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
body (human), and knowledge acquisition/cognition Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cognition, and the body/senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
cognition, theological Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
consensus Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
conte, g. b. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 198
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cult, action Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 235
cult, cause of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
cult, practices Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
culture history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de rerum natura (lucretius) Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
death, epicureanism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
death, fear of Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
divine being, aphrodite, venus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
divine being, zeus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
dream Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113, 198; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epicurus, authority in the de rerum natura Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227
epicurus, theology Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 197, 198; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 218; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epiphany Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fear Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
freedom, freed persons Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
gift Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
god, gods, epicurean Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
godlikeness Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in lucretius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63, 66
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 198
gods, location in epicureanism Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods/goddesses, belief in Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
gods/goddesses, common notion of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
gods/goddesses, epiphanies of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
gratitude Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
horror Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 198
imperishability Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
inference Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218, 235
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intentionality, content of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
intentionality, doxastic states of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63, 66
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, devotion to epicurus Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227
lucretius, mirabilia in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 197, 198
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113, 197, 198
lucretius, theology Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 227
lucretius Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214, 218, 235; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63, 66
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
mind, cognition Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
mind Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
mirabilia, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 197, 198
mirabilia, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 198
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
nature, natural phenomena, cloud Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, comet Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, earth, land Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
nature, natural phenomena, earthquake Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, hail(storm) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, heaven, sky Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, hurricane Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, moon Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, rain(storm) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, seasons Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, snow Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena, stars Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, storm, tempest Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, sun Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, thunder(storm), lightning Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
nature, natural phenomena, wind Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
nature, natural phenomena Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
oath, vow Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
perception, sensory perception Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
philosophy, and preparation for death Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
philosophy, epicurean Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
pietas Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 235
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 198
prolēpsis Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 218
psychological hedonism Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
psychological mode, desire Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 214
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113, 197, 198
religion passim, altar Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41
religion passim, hymn Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
religion passim, origin of religion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
religion passim, piety Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40, 41, 42
religion passim, prayer Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religion passim, ritual, rite Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41, 42
religion passim, sacrifice Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 41
religion passim, temple, shrine Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
religion passim, theophany, epiphany Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63, 66
salvation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 66
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
spontaneity Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
superstitio, in lucretius epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
temple buildings' Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 107
theology Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
universalism Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 40
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
value, in epicureanism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 119
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
violence Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 113
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 198
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
xerxes i Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 107