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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.1120-5.1142
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Ergo regibus occisis subversa iacebatAnd therefore kings were slain, And pristine majesty of golden thrones And haughty sceptres lay o'erturned in dust; And crowns, so splendid on the sovereign heads, Soon bloody under the proletarian feet, Groaned for their glories gone- for erst o'er-much Dreaded, thereafter with more greedy zest Trampled beneath the rabble heel. Thus things Down to the vilest lees of brawling mobs Succumbed, whilst each man sought unto himself Dominion and supremacy. So next Some wiser heads instructed men to found The magisterial office, and did frame Codes that they might consent to follow laws. For humankind, o'er wearied with a life Fostered by force, was ailing from its feuds; And so the sooner of its own free will Yielded to laws and strictest codes. For since Each hand made ready in its wrath to take A vengeance fiercer than by man's fair laws Is now conceded, men on this account Loathed the old life fostered by force. 'Tis thence That fear of punishments defiles each prize Of wicked days; for force and fraud ensnare Each man around, and in the main recoil On him from whence they sprung. Not easy 'tis For one who violates by ugly deeds The bonds of common peace to pass a life Composed and tranquil. For albeit he 'scape The race of gods and men, he yet must dread 'Twill not be hid forever- since, indeed, So many, oft babbling on amid their dreams Or raving in sickness, have betrayed themselves (As stories tell) and published at last Old secrets and the sins.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 151, 202-292, 639-640, 150 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

150. They liked fell warfare and audacity;
2. Callimachus, Aetia, 1.25-1.28 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 15.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.4, 1.7, 1.29-1.49, 1.54-1.55, 1.102-1.145, 1.160-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.926-1.950, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.1-2.36, 2.48-2.52, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.648, 2.730, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.11-3.13, 3.59-3.86, 3.417, 3.419, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 3.995-3.1002, 4.1-4.5, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 4.1120, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.508, 5.772-5.1119, 5.1121-5.1457, 6.1-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Vergil, Eclogues, 6.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.10. to the slim oaten reed my silvan lay.
7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.23, 1.204, 2.136-2.176, 2.498-2.499, 3.1-3.48, 3.284-3.285, 3.289, 3.291-3.292, 3.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.6. Such are my themes. O universal light 1.7. Most glorious! ye that lead the gliding year 1.8. Along the sky, Liber and Ceres mild 1.9. If by your bounty holpen earth once changed 1.10. Chaonian acorn for the plump wheat-ear 1.11. And mingled with the grape, your new-found gift 1.12. The draughts of Achelous; and ye Faun 1.13. To rustics ever kind, come foot it, Faun 1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.16. Sprang from earth's womb at thy great trident's stroke 1.17. Neptune; and haunter of the groves, for whom 1.18. Three hundred snow-white heifers browse the brakes 1.19. The fertile brakes of placeName key= 1.20. Thy native forest and Lycean lawns 1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.204. Without which, neither can be sown nor reared 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.284. Learns to fling wrath into his horns, with blow 3.285. Provokes the air, and scattering clouds of sand 3.289. As in mid ocean when a wave far of 3.291. Its rounded breast, and, onward rolled to land 3.292. Falls with prodigious roar among the rocks 3.294. Upseethe in swirling eddies, and disgorge
8. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 2.6-2.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.6. We speak wisdom, however, among those who are fullgrown; yet a wisdom not of this world, nor of the rulers of this world,who are coming to nothing. 2.7. But we speak God's wisdom in amystery, the wisdom that has been hidden, which God foreordained beforethe worlds to our glory 2.8. which none of the rulers of this worldhas known. For had they known it, they wouldn't have crucified the Lordof glory. 2.9. But as it is written,"Things which an eye didn't see, and an ear didn't hear,Which didn't enter into the heart of man,These God has prepared for those who love him. 2.10. But to us, God revealed them through the Spirit. For theSpirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God. 2.11. For whoamong men knows the things of a man, except the spirit of the man,which is in him? Even so, no one knows the things of God, except God'sSpirit. 2.12. But we received, not the spirit of the world, but theSpirit which is from God, that we might know the things that werefreely given to us by God. 2.13. Which things also we speak, not inwords which man's wisdom teaches, but which the Holy Spirit teaches,comparing spiritual things with spiritual things. 2.14. Now thenatural man doesn't receive the things of God's Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can't know them, because they arespiritually discerned. 2.15. But he who is spiritual discerns allthings, and he himself is judged by no one. 2.16. For who has knownthe mind of the Lord, that he should instruct him?" But we haveChrist's mind.
10. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 5.3-5.10, 5.20-5.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.3. For when they are saying, "Peace and safety," then sudden destruction will come on them, like birth pains on a pregt woman; and they will in no way escape. 5.4. But you, brothers, aren't in darkness, that the day should overtake you like a thief. 5.5. You are all sons of light, and sons of the day. We don't belong to the night, nor to darkness 5.6. so then let's not sleep, as the rest do, but let's watch and be sober. 5.7. For those who sleep, sleep in the night, and those who are drunken are drunken in the night. 5.8. But let us, since we belong to the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love, and, for a helmet, the hope of salvation. 5.9. For God didn't appoint us to wrath, but to the obtaining of salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ 5.10. who died for us, that, whether we wake or sleep, we should live together with him. 5.20. Don't despise prophesies. 5.21. Test all things, and hold firmly that which is good.
11. New Testament, Ephesians, 3.4-3.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.4. by which, when you read, you can perceive my understanding in the mystery of Christ; 3.5. which in other generations was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets in the Spirit; 3.6. that the Gentiles are fellow heirs, and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of his promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel 3.7. whereof I was made a servant, according to the gift of that grace of God which was given me according to the working of his power.
12. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90.8, 90.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 1.7-1.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

1.7. 7.The Epicureans, however, narrating, as it were, a long genealogy, say, that the ancient legislators, looking to the association of life, and the mutual actions of men, proclaimed that manslaughter was unholy, and punished it with no casual disgrace. Perhaps, indeed, a certain natural alliance which exists in men towards each other, though the similitude of form and soul, is the reason why they do not so readily destroy an animal of this kind, as some of the other animals which are conceded to our use. Nevertheless, the greatest cause why manslaughter was considered as a thing grievous to be borne, and impious, was the opinion that it did not contribute to the whole nature and condition of human life. For, from a principle of this kind, those who are capable of perceiving the advantage arising from this decree, require no other cause of being restrained from a deed so dire. But those who are not able to have a sufficient perception of this, being terrified by the magnitude of the punishment, will abstain from readily destroying each other. For those, indeed, who survey the utility of the before-mentioned ordice, will promptly observe it; but those who are not able to perceive the benefit with which it is attended, will obey the mandate, in consequence of fearing the threatenings of the laws; which threatenings certain persons ordained for the sake of those who could not, by a reasoning process, infer the beneficial tendency of the decree, at the same time that most would admit this to be evident. SPAN 1.8. 8.For none of those legal institutes which were established from the |15 first, whether written or unwritten, and which still remain, and are adapted to be transmitted, [from one generation to another] became lawful through violence, but through the consent of those that used them. For those who introduced things of this kind to the multitude, excelled in wisdom, and not in strength of body, and the power which subjugates the rabble. Hence, through this, some were led to a rational consideration of utility, of which they had only an irrational sensation, and which they had frequently forgotten; but others were terrified by the magnitude of the punishments. For it was not possible to use any other remedy for the ignorance of what is beneficial than the dread of the punishment ordained by law. For this alone even now keeps the vulgar in awe, and prevents them from doing any thing, either publicly or privately, which is not beneficial [to the community]. But if all men were similarly capable of surveying and recollecting what is advantageous, there would be no need of laws, but men would spontaneously avoid such things as are prohibited, and perform such as they were ordered to do. For a survey of what is useful and detrimental, is a sufficient incentive to the avoidance of the one and the choice of the other. But the infliction of punishment has a reference to those who do not foresee what is beneficial. For impendent punishment forcibly compels such as these to subdue those impulses which lead them to useless actions, and to do that which is right. SPAN
14. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 14, 28, 7, 12



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
aeetes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 42, 43
amor, poetry and Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
apocalyptic, jewish Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
apollo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
ataraxia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
bible, responses to Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
bonus eventus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
callimachus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
cassius (gaius cassius longinus) Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 189
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
cicero Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 189
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
culture history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 42, 43
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
day of the lord Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
deification, of epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
deification, of octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
epicureanism, afterlife, view of Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism, on friendship Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
epicureanism, simplicity of life Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
epicureanism, thessalonians Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
epicureans, epicureanism Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
epicurus, view of security Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31; Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
eschatology, realized Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
eschatology Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fear, personified Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
flora Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
friendship, epicurean Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
friendship Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
hermarchus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 249
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
imagery, agricultural Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 42
invidia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
justice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 43
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
law Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
liber Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 190
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190, 249
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 189
luna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
lympha Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
minerva Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31, 190
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 31
pain Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 189
parousia Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
physical description, thesslanonians Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190, 249
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 190
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31, 190
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 42, 43
porphyry Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 27
redemption Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
religion Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
robigo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
society Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
sol Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
spontaneity Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 42
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
teacher, false Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
tellus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
tradition, apocalyptic' Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 370
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 27, 31
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 190
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 27, 31
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 249
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190, 249
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190, 249
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 190, 249
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 43