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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.111-5.112
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 368-371, 367 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

367. ἰπούμενος ῥίζαισιν Αἰτναίαις ὕπο·
3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, On Divination, 2.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.43. Hoc fortasse rei publicae causa constitutum est; comitiorum enim non habendorum causas esse voluerunt. Itaque comitiorum solum vitium est fulmen, quod idem omnibus rebus optumum auspicium habemus, si sinistrum fuit. Sed de auspiciis alio loco, nunc de fulgoribus. Quid igitur minus a physicis dici debet quam quicquam certi significari rebus incertis? Non enim te puto esse eum, qui Iovi fulmen fabricatos esse Cyclopas in Aetna putes; 2.43. This was ordained, perhaps, from reasons of political expediency; for our ancestors wished to have some excuse for not holding elections sometimes. And so lightning is an unfavourable sign only in case of an election; in all other cases we consider it the best of auspices, if it appears on the left side. But I shall speak of auspices in another connexion — now I am going to discuss lightnings.[19] There is, then, no statement less worthy of a natural philosopher than that anything can be foretold with a certainty by uncertain signs. of course I do not think you are credulous enough to believe that Joves thunderbolt was made on Mount Aetna by the Cyclopes.
7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.49, 1.62-1.111, 1.116-1.118, 1.123, 1.250-1.251, 1.717-1.718, 1.722-1.725, 1.730-1.732, 1.737-1.738, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.600-2.643, 2.645-2.654, 2.992-2.998, 2.1001, 2.1039, 2.1090-2.1104, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.18-3.24, 3.371, 3.978-3.1023, 4.12-4.39, 5.8, 5.76-5.90, 5.110, 5.112-5.415, 5.490-5.491, 5.622, 5.780-5.820, 5.1136-5.1150, 5.1161-5.1240, 5.1423-5.1429, 6.50-6.55, 6.76, 6.286, 6.379-6.422, 6.644, 6.670, 6.680-6.693, 6.1228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.440 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.440. the Albula, its true and ancient style.
9. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63, 1.316-1.334, 1.471-1.473, 2.323-2.345, 3.272, 4.173 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole; 3.272. With mighty groaning; all the forest-side 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive
10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.77, 10.139 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.77. For troubles and anxieties and feelings of anger and partiality do not accord with bliss, but always imply weakness and fear and dependence upon one's neighbours. Nor, again, must we hold that things which are no more than globular masses of fire, being at the same time endowed with bliss, assume these motions at will. Nay, in every term we use we must hold fast to all the majesty which attaches to such notions as bliss and immortality, lest the terms should generate opinions inconsistent with this majesty. Otherwise such inconsistency will of itself suffice to produce the worst disturbance in our minds. Hence, where we find phenomena invariably recurring, the invariableness of the recurrence must be ascribed to the original interception and conglomeration of atoms whereby the world was formed. 10.139. [A blessed and eternal being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; hence he is exempt from movements of anger and partiality, for every such movement implies weakness [Elsewhere he says that the gods are discernible by reason alone, some being numerically distinct, while others result uniformly from the continuous influx of similar images directed to the same spot and in human form.]Death is nothing to us; for the body, when it has been resolved into its elements, has no feeling, and that which has no feeling is nothing to us.The magnitude of pleasure reaches its limit in the removal of all pain. When pleasure is present, so long as it is uninterrupted, there is no pain either of body or of mind or of both together.
11. Porphyry, Letter To Marcella, 24 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. No god is responsible for a man's evils, for he has chosen his lot himself. The prayer which is accompanied by base actions is impure, and |45 therefore not acceptable to God; but that which is accompanied by noble actions is pure, and at the same time acceptable. There are four first principles that must be upheld concerning God—faith, truth, love, hope. We must have faith that our only salvation is in turning to God. And having faith, we must strive with all our might to know the truth about God. And when we know this, we must love Him we do know. And when we love Him we must nourish our souls on good hopes for our life, for it is by their good hopes good men are superior to bad ones. Let then these four principles be firmly held.
12. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 123

13. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 76



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
aetiology of labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), (stoic) of gigantomachy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 36
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
anger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
apollo Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
aristotle Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
consolatio, consolatory tradition Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
des places, e. Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
deucalion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diogenes of oenoanda Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
egeria Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicureanism, in lucretiuss works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
epicureanism, theology of Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epicurus, on divine kindness Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
epicurus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
fear Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
fire narratives, in lucretiuss works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
four-element theory Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 36
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
gigantomachy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 36
gods, in lucretius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 122
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
hecate Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
hieros gamos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
imagery, gigantomachy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
immortality Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 122
le bonniec Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
materialism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
natura Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
numa Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
oracular, philosophy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 38
orpheus Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
plato, laws Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
plato, lucretius and Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
proclus Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
prometheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
prophecies, in lucretiuss works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
pythagoreans, pythagoreanism, pythagorizing Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
pythia Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 60
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
superstitio, in lucretius epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
tellus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
templum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
typhoeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
vates, pythagoras role as Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
vates ovid as Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 140
velleius, epicurean philosopher' Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 139
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 122
xenophanes Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71