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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 3.978-3.1023
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Atque ea ni mirum quae cumque Acherunte profundoAnd, verily, those tortures said to be In Acheron, the deep, they all are ours Here in this life. No Tantalus, benumbed With baseless terror, as the fables tell, Fears the huge boulder hanging in the air: But, rather, in life an empty dread of Gods Urges mortality, and each one fears Such fall of fortune as may chance to him. Nor eat the vultures into TityusProstrate in Acheron, nor can they find, Forsooth, throughout eternal ages, aught To pry around for in that mighty breast. However hugely he extend his bulk- Who hath for outspread limbs not acres nine, But the whole earth- he shall not able be To bear eternal pain nor furnish food From his own frame forever. But for us A Tityus is he whom vultures rend Prostrate in love, whom anxious anguish eats, Whom troubles of any unappeased desires Asunder rip. We have before our eyes Here in this life also a SisyphusIn him who seeketh of the populace The rods, the axes fell, and evermore Retires a beaten and a gloomy man. For to seek after power- an empty name, Nor given at all- and ever in the search To endure a world of toil, O this it is To shove with shoulder up the hill a stone Which yet comes rolling back from off the top, And headlong makes for levels of the plain. Then to be always feeding an ingrate mind, Filling with good things, satisfying never- As do the seasons of the year for us, When they return and bring their progenies And varied charms, and we are never filled With the fruits of life- O this, I fancy, 'tis To pour, like those young virgins in the tale, Waters into a sieve, unfilled forever. . . . . . . Cerberus and Furies, and that Lack of Light . . . . . . Tartarus, out-belching from his mouth the surge Of horrible heat- the which are nowhere, nor Indeed can be: but in this life is fear Of retributions just and expiations For evil acts: the dungeon and the leap From that dread rock of infamy, the stripes, The executioners, the oaken rack, The iron plates, bitumen, and the torch. And even though these are absent, yet the mind, With a fore-fearing conscience, plies its goads And burns beneath the lash, nor sees meanwhile What terminus of ills, what end of pine Can ever be, and feareth lest the same But grow more heavy after death. Of truth, The life of fools is Acheron on earth.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

471a. Pol. Then this Archelaus, on your statement, is wretched? Soc. Yes, my friend, supposing he is unjust. Pol. Well, but how can he be other than unjust? He had no claim to the throne which he now occupies, being the son of a woman who was a slave of Perdiccas’ brother Alcetas, and in mere justice he was Alcetas’ slave; and if he wished to do what is just, he would be serving Alcetas and would be happy, by your account; but, as it is, he has become a prodigy of wretchedness
2. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

32c. the sweet and cheering hope of pleasant things to come, the fearful and woful expectation of painful things to come. Pro. Yes, indeed, this is another kind of pleasure and pain, which belongs to the soul itself, apart from the body, and arises through expectation. Soc. You are right. I think that in these two kinds, both of which are, in my opinion, pure, and not formed by mixture of pain and pleasure, the truth about pleasure will be made manifest
3. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 1.65 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.65. Restat locus huic disputationi vel maxime necessarius de amicitia, quam, si voluptas summum sit bonum, affirmatis nullam omnino fore. de qua Epicurus quidem ita dicit, omnium rerum, quas ad beate vivendum sapientia comparaverit, nihil esse maius amicitia, nihil uberius, nihil iucundius. nec vero hoc hoc hos A 1 BER oratione solum, sed multo magis vita et factis et moribus comprobavit. quod quam magnum sit fictae veterum fabulae declarant, in quibus tam multis tamque variis ab ultima antiquitate repetitis tria vix amicorum paria reperiuntur, ut ad Orestem pervenias profectus a Theseo. at vero Epicurus una in domo, et ea quidem angusta, quam magnos quantaque amoris conspiratione consentientis tenuit amicorum greges! quod fit etiam nunc ab Epicureis. sed ad rem redeamus; de hominibus dici non necesse est.
5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.86 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.86. It is in fact doubtful whether he means that there is a blessed and immortal being, or that, if there is, that being is such as he describes. They fail to notice that although his language is ambiguous here, yet in many other places both he and Metrodorus speak as plainly as you yourself did just now. Epicurus however does actually think that the gods exist, nor have I ever met anybody more afraid than he was of those things which he says are not terrible at all, I mean death and the gods. Terrors that do not very seriously alarm ordinary people, according to Epicurus haunt the minds of all mortal men: so many thousands commit brigandage, for which the penalty is death, and other men rob temples whenever they have the chance; I suppose the former are haunted by the fear of death and the latter by the terrors of religion!
6. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.11, 1.25, 1.36-1.38, 1.78, 1.83, 3.28, 3.32-3.33, 3.52, 3.58-3.59, 3.76, 4.35, 4.83, 5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.11. Atqui pleni libri sunt contra ista ipsa disserentium dissenentium G 1 (dissotium corr. G 1? ) RV 1 ( corr. ipse? ) diserentium K philosophorum. Inepte sane. quis enim est est om. K 1, add. c tam excors, quem ista moveant? commoveant V 2 Si ergo apud inferos miseri non sunt, ne sunt quidem apud inferos ulli. Ita prorsus prossus G existimo. Ubi sunt Inde ab ubi - 223, 24 iam sunt multa in K madore corrupta ergo i, quos miseros dicis, aut quem locum incolunt? si enim sunt, nusquam esse non possunt. Ego vero nusquam esse illos puto. Igitur ne esse quidem? Prorsus isto modo, et tamen miseros miseros cf. Serv. Aen. 4, 20 ob id ipsum quidem, quidem om. K quia nulli sint. 1.25. hoc dasne aut manere animos post mortem aut morte ipsa interire? Do vero. Quid, quod K 1 (corr. 2 ) R si maneant? Beatos beatas V esse concedo. Sin intereant? Non esse miseros, quoniam ne sint quidem; iam iam cf. p. 225,21 ac. 2, 109 al. (Mue) istuc coacti a te paulo ante concessimus. Quo modo igitur aut cur mortem malum tibi videri dicis? quae aut beatos nos efficiet animis manentibus aut non miseros sensu carentis. carentes V 2 1.36. Sed ut deos esse natura opinamur, qualesque que del. Bai. sint, ratione cognoscimus, quodsi ... 235, 6 cognoscimus ( omissis 235,2 maxume ... 235, 4 habiturus) H (libere) sic permanere animos arbitramur consensu nationum omnium, qua in sede maneant qualesque sint, ratione discendum est. cuius ignoratio ingnoratio GV 1 finxit inferos easque formidines, quas tu contemnere non sine causa videbare. in terram enim cadentibus corporibus isque humo tectis, e quo aquo V 1 (aq in r. 1 ) eqd V 2 mg. dictum est humari, sub terra censebant reliquam vitam agi mortuorum; quam eorum opinionem magni errores consecuti sunt, quos auxerunt poëtae. 1.37. frequens enim consessus quos... con in r. K 1 consessus s consensu X, s in fine add. V 1 theatri, in quo sunt mulierculae et pueri, movetur audiens tam grande carmen: A/dsum Trag. inc. 73 atque advenio A/cherunte acher onte K (u ss. c ) vi/x via alta atque a/rdua Pe/r speluncas sa/xis structas a/speris pende/ntibus Ma/xumis, ubi ri/gida constat cra/ssa crassa s. v. add. K c caligo i/nferum, ubi ...inferum Non. 272,39 tantumque valuit error—qui mihi quidem iam sublatus videtur—, ut, corpora cremata cum scirent, tamen ea fieri apud inferos fingerent, quae sine corporibus nec fieri possent possunt V 2 nec intellegi. animos enim per se se s. v. add. V c ipsos viventis vigentis ex viventis V 1 non poterant mente complecti, formam aliquam figuramque quaerebant. inde Homeri tota ne/kuia, NECUIA KRV ( sed A in p A corr. 1 ) necyia mai. litt. G NErCUO mantia RK nepsyomantia mai. litt. G psichomantia, sed psicho in r. V 1 aut 2 ( ex div. 1, 132 ) corr. Dav. inde ea quae meus amicus Appius nekuomantei=a faciebat, inde -de in om. K 1 add. c in vicinia vitia KRV 1 (vicinia corr. 1 ) vicia G nostra Averni lacus, u/nde animae excita/ntur obscura u/mbra opertae, apertae ( vel ę, -e K 1 ) opertę corr. V 1 K 2 ima/gines mo/rtuorum, alto o/stio hostio alte (altę K 1 ) ostio s alto corr. K 2 V 1aut2 s . locum rest. Leo. alii aut imagines mortuorum in fine relicta male Ciceroni ipsi tribuunt aut ibi mort. imagines scribunt (praeterea aperto ex ostio Mdv. opertae ex ostio Ribb. altae Klotz) Acheru/ntis, acheruntis (acherontis KV 1 e corr. ) s. s. imagines mortuorum X salso sa/nguine. Trag. inc. 76 cf. Leo Progr. Gott. 1910 p. 21. has tamen imagines loqui volunt, quod fieri nec sine lingua nec sine palato nec sine faucium laterum pulmonum vi et figura potest. nihil enim animo videre poterant, ad oculos omnia referebant. 1.38. Magni autem est ingenii sevocare sevocare Aug. revocare W mentem a sensibus et cogitationem ab consuetudine a consuetudine V ( ult. e ex o) abducere. Quidam enim nihil animo ... 9 abducere H magni.. 9 abducere Aug. epist. 137,5 itaque credo equidem etiam alios tot saeculis, sed quod quot G litteris exstet, extet K cf. Lact. inst. 7, 8, 7 Aug. epist. 137,12 Pherecydes Syrius syrus X syrius s Aug. primus primum W primus Bentl. atque hoc legisse videtur Aug. : 'quod apud Graecos olim primus Pherecydes Syrius cum disputavisset', dixit animos esse hominum sempiternos, antiquus antiquo s K 1 R 1 sane; fuit enim meo regte gentili. hanc opinionem discipulus eius Pythagoras maxime confirmavit, qui cum Superbo regte in Italiam venisset, tenuit Magnam illam Graeciam cum honore honore del. V vet honore et disc. s disciplina, tum etiam auctoritate, multaque saecula postea sic viguit Pythagoreorum nomen, ut nulli alii docti viderentur. iderentur V sed redeo ad antiquos. rationem illi sententiae suae non fere reddebant, nisi quid erat numeris aut descriptionibus descriptionibus B s discriptionibus X (discretionibus V) explicandum: 1.78. movemur enim saepe aliquo acute concluso, labamus mutamusque sententiam clarioribus etiam in rebus; in his est enim aliqua obscuritas. id igitur si acciderit, simus siminus GKR 1 (corr. 1? ) V 1 (corr. 2 ) armati. Sane quidem, sed ne accidat, accidit K 1 V 1 providebo. Num quid igitur est causae, quin quin ex qui K 2 amicos nostros Stoicos dimittamus? eos dico, qui aiunt manere animos, cum e corpore excesserint, excesserint add. K 2 sed non semper. Istos vero qui, quod tota in hac causa difficillimum est, suscipiant, posse animum manere corpore vacantem, illud autem, quod non modo facile ad credendum est, sed eo concesso, quod volunt, consequens, id vero id vero Kl. idcirco (id non concedant Mdv. ) non dant, ut, cum diu permanserit, ne intereat. 1.83. fit enim ad punctum temporis. Illud angit vel potius excruciat, discessus ab omnibus is quae sunt bona in vita . vide ne a malis nea malis K ( fuit m vel ni) dici verius possit. quid ego nunc lugeam vitam hominum? vere et iure possum; sed quid necesse est, cum id agam ne post mortem miseros nos putemus fore, etiam vitam efficere deplorando miseriorem? fecimus hoc in eo libro, in quo nosmet ipsos, quantum potuimus, consolati sumus. a malis igitur mors abducit, non a bonis, verum si sqq. Val. Max 8, 9 ext. 3 quaerimus. et quidem hoc ecquidem GRV h q dĕ (= haec quidem) K 1 (hoc quidem ss. 2 ) a Cyrenaico Hegesia he gesia R 1 sic copiose disputatur, ut is a rege Ptolomaeo ptolomeo K ptholomeo GV prohibitus esse dicatur illa in scholis dicere, quod quod V 2 s quo X multi is auditis mortem sibi ipsi consciscerent. -scerent in r. V c 3.28. Atque hoc quidem perspicuum est, tum tum add. G 2 aegritudinem existere, cum quid ita visum sit, ut magnum quoddam malum adesse et urgere videatur. Epicuro autem placet opinionem mali aegritudinem esse ea ante esse add. V 2 natura, esse, ea natura Usen. Ep. fr. 444 ( sed cf. 334,14 necesse esse eqs.) ex opinione pro opinionem Sey. efficere pro esse Bai. cf. quae dixi Herm. XLI 323 ut, quicumque intueatur in aliquod maius malum, si id sibi accidisse opinetur, sit continuo in aegritudine. aegritudinem X Cyrenaici non omni malo malo modo R 1 aegritudinem aegritudine GK 1 effici censent, sed insperato et necopinato malo. est id quidem non mediocre ad aegritudinem augendam: videntur enim omnia repentina graviora. ex hoc et illa iure laudantur: E/go cum genui, tu/m morituros moriturum et huic rei Sen. ad Pol. 11, 2 sci/vi et ei rei Enn. Telam. sc. 312. cf. Hier. epist. 60, 5 su/stuli. Prae/terea praeterea ae in r. V c ad Troia/m cum misi ob de/fendendam Grae/ciam, Sci/bam scibam Fronto p. 217 sciebam me in morti/ferum bellum, no/n in epulas mi/ttere. 3.32. Sed est, isdem de rebus quod dici possit subtilius, si prius Epicuri sententiam viderimus. qui censet Epic. fr. 444 necesse esse omnis in aegritudine esse, qui se in malis esse arbitrentur, sive illa ante provisa et expectata sint sive inveteraverint. nam neque vetustate minui mala nec fieri praemeditata leviora, stultamque etiam esse meditationem futuri mali aut fortasse ne futuri quidem: satis esse odiosum malum omne, cum venisset; cum venisset ex conv. K 2 qui autem semper cogitavisset accidere posse aliquid adversi, ei fieri illud sempiternum malum; si vero ne futurum quidem sit, sit ex si V c frustra suscipi miseriam voluntariam; voluntariam add. GR 1 in fine pag. ita semper angi aut accipiendo aut cogitando malo. 3.33. Levationem autem aegritudinis in duabus rebus ponit, avocatione a cogitanda molestia et revocatione revocationem GKV 1 ad contemplandas voluptates. parere pareri GR 1 ( corr. 1 ) V 1 ( corr. 2 ) enim censet animum rationi posse et, quo illa ducat, sequi. vetat igitur ratio intueri molestias, abstrahit ab acerbis cogitationibus, hebetem habetem V 1 aciem ad miserias contemplandas facit; facit add. V c ( ante aciem We. ft. rectius cf. docere 220,13 sed cf. off. 1, 12 extr. al. ) om. cett. a quibus cum cecinit cecidit X corr. 2 receptui, inpellit receptuimpellit VHK c (receptaimp. K 1 )G 2 (receptum pellit 1 ) receptū impellit R rursum et incitat ad conspiciendas totaque mente contrectandas contractandas K ( ex -tes 1 ) H varias voluptates, vetat... 335, 4 voluptates H quibus ille et praeteritarum memoria et spe consequentium sapientis vitam refertam putat. refert amputat G 1 R 1 V 1 Haec nostro more nos diximus, Epicurii epicurei R c K 2 dicunt suo; sed quae quae ex qui V 2 dicant, videamus, quo modo, neglegamus. 3.52. qui tum aegritudinem censent existere, si necopinato quid evenerit. est id quidem magnum, ut supra supra p. 332, 6 dixi; etiam Chrysippo Chrys. fr. eth. 417 crysippo X ita videri scio, quod provisum ante non sit, id ferire ferire fieri X corr. V c aut 1 vehementius; sed non sunt in hoc hic in hoc G ( exp. 2 ) omnia. quamquam hostium et ante hostium add. V 2 non male repens adventus advetus G 1 R 1 V 1 magis aliquanto aliquando X corr. V c aut 1 conturbat quam expectatus, et maris subita tempestas quam ante provisa terret provisitaret K 1 navigantes vehementius, et eius modi sunt pleraque. sed cum diligenter necopinatorum naturam consideres, nihil aliud reperias repperias G R 1 V nisi omnia videri subita maiora, et quidem ob duas causas, primum quod, quanta sint quae accidunt, post accidunt V c in mg. add. : et qualia, cum repente accidunt ( non inepte cf. p. 345, 21 ) considerandi spatium non datur, deinde, cum cum tum G videtur praecaveri potuisse, si provisum esset, quasi culpa contractum malum aegritudinem acriorem facit. 3.58. similiter commemorandis exemplis orbitates quoque liberum liberorum V c praedicantur, eorumque, eorum quoque K 1 qui gravius ferunt, luctus aliorum exemplis leniuntur. sic perpessio ceterorum facit, ut ea quae acciderint multo minora maiora ex minora V c quam quanta sint existimata, videantur. ita fit, sensim cogitantibus ut, quantum sit ementita opinio, appareat. atque hoc idem et Telamo ille declarat: ego cum genui et Theseus: futuras mecum commentabar miserias tum morituros scivi et ei rei sustuli add. R 2, moriturum scivi V 3 et Anaxagoras: sciebam me genuisse mortalem. cf. p. 332, 9 sqq. hi enim omnes diu cogitantes de rebus humanis intellegebant eas nequaquam pro opinione volgi esse extimescendas. extimescendas KR 1 existimescendas R c G existimiscendas G 1 e corr. V et mihi quidem videtur idem fere accidere is qui ante meditantur, quod is quibus medetur dies, nisi quod ratio ratio V ratione GKR ( unde in hoc quae- dam 2? ) quaedam sanat illos, hos ipsa natura intellecto eo quod rem continet, illud illud continet X trp. B malum, quod opinatum sit esse maxumum, nequaquam esse tantum, ut vitam beatam possit evertere. 3.59. hoc igitur efficitur, ut ex illo necopinato plaga maior sit, non, ut illi putant, ut, cum duobus pares casus evenerint, is modo aegritudine adficiatur, aff. KR cui ille necopinato casus evenerit. Itaque dicuntur non nulli in maerore, cum de hac communi hominum condicione audivissent, ea lege esse nos natos, ut nemo in perpetuum esse posset expers mali, gravius etiam tulisse. quocirca Carneades, ut video nostrum scribere Antiochum, anthiochum KR reprendere reprehendere KV c Chrysippum crysippum X Chr. fr. eth. 487 solebat laudantem Euripideum carmen illud: Eurip. Hypsip. fr. 757 ( S. Eur. ed. Arn. p. 62 ) Morta/lis nemo est que/m non non om. X add. K 2 V c attinga/t attingit W (attigit K) vix recte, cf. Mue. in Seyfferti Laelio p. 143 dolor Morbu/sque; multis multis Lb. multi su/nt humandi li/beri, Rursu/m creandi, mo/rsque mors quae GK (morsquę) R 1 V (s in r. c ) est finita o/mnibus. Quae ge/neri genere X corr. V 3 humano ango/rem nequicquam a/dferunt: adferant V 2 Redde/nda terrae est te/rra, tum tum tam Sey. nam Küh. vita o/mnibus Mete/nda ut fruges. si/c iubet Nece/ssitas. 3.76. sunt qui unum officium consolantis cons olantis R 1 consulantis GK 1 V 1 putent putent docere Lb. Cleanthes fr. 576 malum illud omnino non esse, ut Cleanthi placet; sunt qui non magnum malum, ut Peripatetici; sunt qui abducant a malis ad bona, ut Epicurus; sunt qui satis satis om. G 1 putent ostendere nihil inopinati inopiti GRV 1 (n exp. c ) opiti K accidisse, ut Cyrenaici lac. stat. Po. ut Cyrenaici pro nihil mali (nihil a mali V 1 ) Dav. cogitari potest: ut Cyr. atque hi quoque, si verum quaeris, efficere student ut non multum adesse videatur aut nihil mall. Chr. cf. § 52–59. 61 extr. Chrys. fr. eth. 486 nihil mali. Chrysippus autem caput esse censet in consolando detrahere detra in r. V c illam opinionem maerentis, qua se maerentis se X (mer. KR) qd add. V 2 maerentis si vel maerentl si s ( sed sec. Chr. omnes qui maerent in illa opinione sunt; non recte p. 275, 19 confert Va. Op. 1, 70 ) qua Po. officio fungi putet iusto atque debito. sunt etiam qui haec omnia genera consolandi colligant abducunt... 21 putant... 356, 2 colligunt X 356, 2 colligant V 2 abducant et putent Ern. ( obloq. Küh. Sey. cf. tamen nat. deor. 2, 82 al. ). inconcinnitatem modorum def. Gaffiot cf. ad p. 226, 23 —alius enim alio modo movetur—, ut fere nos in Consolatione omnia omnia bis scripsit, prius erasit G omnia exp. et in mg. scr. fecimus. omne genus consolandi V c in consolationem unam coniecimus; erat enim in tumore animus, et omnis in eo temptabatur curatio. sed sumendum tempus est non minus in animorum morbis quam in corporum; ut Prometheus ille Aeschyli, cui cum dictum esset: Atqui/, Prometheu, te ho/c tenere exi/stimo, Mede/ri posse ra/tionem ratione ratione G 1 RV 1 ( alterum exp. G 2 V 1 ratione rationem K 1 (ratione del. K 2 ) orationem Stephanus ( ft. recte cf. lo/goi ) iracu/ndiae, v. 377 respondit: Siquide/m qui qui et ss. V c tempesti/vam medicinam a/dmovens Non a/dgravescens adgr. ss. V c vo/lnus inlida/t manu. manus X s exp. V 4.35. quae si quando adepta erit adepta erit Lb. ea deptaretur K ( m. 2 potius quam 1 ) eademptaretur GRV id quod ei fuerit concupitum, tum ecferetur ecferetur We. (effertur Dav. ) fertur Gr. fert X alacritate, ut nihil ei constet, quod agat, ut ille, qui voluptatem voluptatem eqs. Trabea fr. II eundemque Cic. in verbis nihil ei ei B ( e corr. ) Bentl. est X ( ē. K esse V 3 ) quod s quid X constet ( Com. inc. 37 ) respicit, cf. fin. 2, 14 animi nimiam summum esse errorem arbitratur. eorum igitur malorum in una virtute posita sanatio est. Quid autem est non miserius solum, sed foedius etiam et deformius quam aegritudine quis adflictus debilitatus iacens? cui miseriae proxumus est is qui qui q: V (: in r. V c ) adpropinquans aliquod malum metuit exanimatusque examinatusque K Non. pars pendet animi. aliquod ... 23 animi Non. 498, 2 quam vim mali significantes poëtae impendere apud inferos saxum Tantalo faciunt ob scelera Trag. inc. 110 animique inpotentiam et superbiloquentiam. animique 25 superbiloquentiam Non. 175, 31 ea communis poena stultitiae est. omnibus enim, quorum mens abhorret a ratione, ratio V 1 semper aliqui talis aliqui talis Gron. (aliquis talis Victorius ) cf. p. 432, 7 aliquid aliis W terror impendet. 4.83. itaque non fortuito factum videtur, sed a te ratione propositum, ut separatim de aegritudine et de ceteris perturbationibus disputaremus; in ea est enim fons miseriarum et caput. sed et alt. et om. V aegritudinis et reliquorum animi morborum una sanatio est, omnis opinabilis esse et voluntarios ea reque requae GKR (quae ... videatur in r. K 1 ) suscipi, quod ita rectum esse videatur. hunc errorem quasi radicem malorum omnium stirpitus stirpitus Statil. Max. ap. Char. GL. 2, 219, 25 philosophia se extracturam pollicetur. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
7. Horace, Odes, 2.17.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.6, 1.1.28-1.1.32, 1.1.60, 1.1.62-1.1.63, 1.1.68-1.1.72, 1.4.31-1.4.32, 1.4.110 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.44-1.49, 1.62-1.79, 1.102-1.145, 1.188, 1.199-1.203, 1.926-1.930, 2.2, 2.12-2.13, 2.45-2.46, 2.569-2.580, 2.646-2.651, 2.700-2.707, 2.730, 2.1091-2.1104, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.11-3.13, 3.31-3.93, 3.116, 3.419, 3.580-3.581, 3.660-3.663, 3.670-3.678, 3.687, 3.731-3.732, 3.741-3.753, 3.760-3.770, 3.828-3.999, 3.1001-3.1094, 4.1-4.5, 4.1037-4.1287, 5.1-5.54, 5.110-5.125, 5.165-5.168, 5.213, 5.1020, 5.1120-5.1128, 5.1131-5.1132, 5.1136-5.1151, 5.1161-5.1240, 5.1272, 5.1359, 5.1423-5.1430, 6.50-6.79, 6.379-6.422, 6.1208-6.1212 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.42, 1.125-1.147, 1.160-1.168, 1.446-1.447, 1.512-1.514, 3.3-3.8, 3.115-3.117, 3.258-3.263, 3.266-3.268, 4.149-4.152, 4.170-4.175, 4.453-4.527, 4.560-4.562 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.6. Such are my themes. O universal light 1.7. Most glorious! ye that lead the gliding year 1.8. Along the sky, Liber and Ceres mild 1.9. If by your bounty holpen earth once changed 1.10. Chaonian acorn for the plump wheat-ear 1.11. And mingled with the grape, your new-found gift 1.12. The draughts of Achelous; and ye Faun 1.13. To rustics ever kind, come foot it, Faun 1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.16. Sprang from earth's womb at thy great trident's stroke 1.17. Neptune; and haunter of the groves, for whom 1.18. Three hundred snow-white heifers browse the brakes 1.19. The fertile brakes of placeName key= 1.20. Thy native forest and Lycean lawns 1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.24. Minerva, from whose hand the olive sprung; 1.25. And boy-discoverer of the curved plough; 1.26. And, bearing a young cypress root-uptorn 1.27. Silvanus, and Gods all and Goddesses 1.28. Who make the fields your care, both ye who nurse 1.29. The tender unsown increase, and from heaven 1.30. Shed on man's sowing the riches of your rain: 1.31. And thou, even thou, of whom we know not yet 1.32. What mansion of the skies shall hold thee soon 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.34. Great Caesar, and to take the earth in charge 1.35. That so the mighty world may welcome thee 1.36. Lord of her increase, master of her times 1.37. Binding thy mother's myrtle round thy brow 1.38. Or as the boundless ocean's God thou come 1.39. Sole dread of seamen, till far placeName key= 1.40. Before thee, and Tethys win thee to her son 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.147. But no whit the more 1.160. Even this was impious; for the common stock 1.161. They gathered, and the earth of her own will 1.162. All things more freely, no man bidding, bore. 1.163. He to black serpents gave their venom-bane 1.164. And bade the wolf go prowl, and ocean toss; 1.165. Shooed from the leaves their honey, put fire away 1.166. And curbed the random rivers running wine 1.167. That use by gradual dint of thought on thought 1.168. Might forge the various arts, with furrow's help 1.446. That bring the frost, the Sire of all himself 1.447. Ordained what warnings in her monthly round 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 4.149. Makes the trim garden smile; of placeName key= 4.150. Whose roses bloom and fade and bloom again; 4.151. How endives glory in the streams they drink 4.152. And green banks in their parsley, and how the gourd 4.170. With unbought plenty heaped his board on high. 4.171. He was the first to cull the rose in spring 4.172. He the ripe fruits in autumn; and ere yet 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive 4.174. The rocks with frost, and with her icy bit 4.175. Curb in the running waters, there was he 4.453. Exclaimed, “Cyrene, sister, not for naught 4.454. Scared by a groan so deep, behold! 'tis he 4.455. Even Aristaeus, thy heart's fondest care 4.456. Here by the brink of the Peneian sire 4.457. Stands woebegone and weeping, and by name 4.458. Cries out upon thee for thy cruelty.” 4.459. To whom, strange terror knocking at her heart 4.460. “Bring, bring him to our sight,” the mother cried; 4.461. “His feet may tread the threshold even of Gods.” 4.462. So saying, she bids the flood yawn wide and yield 4.463. A pathway for his footsteps; but the wave 4.464. Arched mountain-wise closed round him, and within 4.465. Its mighty bosom welcomed, and let speed 4.466. To the deep river-bed. And now, with eye 4.467. of wonder gazing on his mother's hall 4.468. And watery kingdom and cave-prisoned pool 4.469. And echoing groves, he went, and, stunned by that 4.470. Stupendous whirl of waters, separate saw 4.471. All streams beneath the mighty earth that glide 4.472. Phasis and Lycus, and that fountain-head 4.473. Whence first the deep Enipeus leaps to light 4.474. Whence father placeName key= 4.475. And Hypanis that roars amid his rocks 4.476. And Mysian Caicus, and, bull-browed 4.477. 'Twixt either gilded horn, placeName key= 4.478. Than whom none other through the laughing plain 4.479. More furious pours into the purple sea. 4.480. Soon as the chamber's hanging roof of stone 4.481. Was gained, and now Cyrene from her son 4.482. Had heard his idle weeping, in due course 4.483. Clear water for his hands the sisters bring 4.484. With napkins of shorn pile, while others heap 4.485. The board with dainties, and set on afresh 4.486. The brimming goblets; with Panchaian fire 4.487. Upleap the altars; then the mother spake 4.488. “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said 4.489. “Pour we to Ocean.” Ocean, sire of all 4.490. She worships, and the sister-nymphs who guard 4.491. The hundred forests and the hundred streams; 4.492. Thrice Vesta's fire with nectar clear she dashed 4.493. Thrice to the roof-top shot the flame and shone: 4.494. Armed with which omen she essayed to speak: 4.495. “In Neptune's gulf Carpathian dwells a seer 4.496. Caerulean Proteus, he who metes the main 4.497. With fish-drawn chariot of two-footed steeds; 4.498. Now visits he his native home once more 4.499. Pallene and the Emathian ports; to him 4.500. We nymphs do reverence, ay, and Nereus old; 4.501. For all things knows the seer, both those which are 4.502. And have been, or which time hath yet to bring; 4.503. So willed it Neptune, whose portentous flocks 4.504. And loathly sea-calves 'neath the surge he feeds. 4.505. Him first, my son, behoves thee seize and bind 4.506. That he may all the cause of sickness show 4.507. And grant a prosperous end. For save by force 4.508. No rede will he vouchsafe, nor shalt thou bend 4.509. His soul by praying; whom once made captive, ply 4.510. With rigorous force and fetters; against these 4.511. His wiles will break and spend themselves in vain. 4.512. I, when the sun has lit his noontide fires 4.513. When the blades thirst, and cattle love the shade 4.514. Myself will guide thee to the old man's haunt 4.515. Whither he hies him weary from the waves 4.516. That thou mayst safelier steal upon his sleep. 4.517. But when thou hast gripped him fast with hand and gyve 4.518. Then divers forms and bestial semblance 4.519. Shall mock thy grasp; for sudden he will change 4.520. To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled 4.521. And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522. A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of 4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524. Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525. His endless transformations, thou, my son 4.526. More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until 4.527. His body's shape return to that thou sawest 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing
11. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32 (1st cent. CE

12. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.72-3.22.73, 3.24.84-3.24.88, 4.1.111 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Epictetus, Enchiridion, 3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Musonius Rufus, Fragments, 3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 4.13-4.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.13. But we don't want you to be ignorant, brothers, concerning those who have fallen asleep, so that you don't grieve like the rest, who have no hope. 4.14. For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so those who have fallen asleep in Jesus will God bring with him. 4.15. For this we tell you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive, who are left to the coming of the Lord, will in no way precede those who have fallen asleep. 4.16. For the Lord himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with God's trumpet. The dead in Christ will rise first 4.17. then we who are alive, who are left, will be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air. So we will be with the Lord forever. 4.18. Therefore comfort one another with these words.
16. Plutarch, On Tranquility of Mind, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 9.1-9.5, 26.6-26.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Polybium (Ad Polybium De Consolatione) (Dialogorum Liber Xi), 6.1-6.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 24.18, 27.1, 40.5, 72.5-72.6, 101.10, 121.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Galen, On The Doctrines of Hippocrates And Plato, 4.7.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, Nigrinus, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. A lover, in the absence of his mistress, remembers some word, some act of hers, dwells on it, and beguiles hours of sickness with her feigned presence. Sometimes he thinks he is face to face with her; words, heard long since, come again from her lips; he rejoices; his soul cleaves to the memory of the past, and has no time for present vexations. It is so with me. Philosophy is far away, but I have heard a philosopher’s words. I piece them together, and revolve them in my heart, and am comforted. Nigrinus is the beacon fire on which, far out in mid ocean, in the darkness of night, I fix my gaze; I fancy him present with me in all my doings; I hear ever the same words. At times, in moments of concentration, I see his very face, his voice rings in my ears. of him it may truly be said, as of Pericles,In every heart he left his sting.
22. Tertullian, Apology, 2.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 1.7-1.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

1.7. 7.The Epicureans, however, narrating, as it were, a long genealogy, say, that the ancient legislators, looking to the association of life, and the mutual actions of men, proclaimed that manslaughter was unholy, and punished it with no casual disgrace. Perhaps, indeed, a certain natural alliance which exists in men towards each other, though the similitude of form and soul, is the reason why they do not so readily destroy an animal of this kind, as some of the other animals which are conceded to our use. Nevertheless, the greatest cause why manslaughter was considered as a thing grievous to be borne, and impious, was the opinion that it did not contribute to the whole nature and condition of human life. For, from a principle of this kind, those who are capable of perceiving the advantage arising from this decree, require no other cause of being restrained from a deed so dire. But those who are not able to have a sufficient perception of this, being terrified by the magnitude of the punishment, will abstain from readily destroying each other. For those, indeed, who survey the utility of the before-mentioned ordice, will promptly observe it; but those who are not able to perceive the benefit with which it is attended, will obey the mandate, in consequence of fearing the threatenings of the laws; which threatenings certain persons ordained for the sake of those who could not, by a reasoning process, infer the beneficial tendency of the decree, at the same time that most would admit this to be evident. SPAN 1.8. 8.For none of those legal institutes which were established from the |15 first, whether written or unwritten, and which still remain, and are adapted to be transmitted, [from one generation to another] became lawful through violence, but through the consent of those that used them. For those who introduced things of this kind to the multitude, excelled in wisdom, and not in strength of body, and the power which subjugates the rabble. Hence, through this, some were led to a rational consideration of utility, of which they had only an irrational sensation, and which they had frequently forgotten; but others were terrified by the magnitude of the punishments. For it was not possible to use any other remedy for the ignorance of what is beneficial than the dread of the punishment ordained by law. For this alone even now keeps the vulgar in awe, and prevents them from doing any thing, either publicly or privately, which is not beneficial [to the community]. But if all men were similarly capable of surveying and recollecting what is advantageous, there would be no need of laws, but men would spontaneously avoid such things as are prohibited, and perform such as they were ordered to do. For a survey of what is useful and detrimental, is a sufficient incentive to the avoidance of the one and the choice of the other. But the infliction of punishment has a reference to those who do not foresee what is beneficial. For impendent punishment forcibly compels such as these to subdue those impulses which lead them to useless actions, and to do that which is right. SPAN
24. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124

25. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 71, 75, 68

26. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

27. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

28. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 2, 1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
allegory Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
ambition, lucretius, ambition is due to fear of death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
amor, and metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
anger, pleasurable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
animal sacrifice, epistemology Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
animal sacrifice, eschatology' Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
annihilation Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
anticipation of misfortune, cyrenaics on unexpected Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
anticipation of misfortune, posidonius Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237
anticipation of misfortune, rejected by epicureans Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
aristippus, cyrenaic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
arnobius, concept of salvation Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
ataraxia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 73
avarice, condemned Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84, 104
avarice, lucretius, due to fear of death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
bion of borysthenes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
cautery Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
cicero Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
competition, aristotle, pleasure of competition comes from hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
consolation Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
consolation writings, hope of continuation Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
consolation writings, is it bad or merely unexpected? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
conversion Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
culture history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
cynics/cynicism, condemned/satirized by greek writers Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
cynics/cynicism, diatribes by Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
cynics/cynicism, mild Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
cynics/cynicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
cyprian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
cyrenaics, anticipate misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
daimon, daemon Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
death, and value Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
death, cicero Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
death, outcome of Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
death Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
diatribe Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
didactic poetry Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
diet, in moral formation Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
dio chrysostom Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
drugs Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
economics, epicurean, economics, philodemus account of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epicureans, against fear of death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 248
epicureans, hope, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus, doctrine of death Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
epicurus, memorization of his doctrines Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus, rejects anticipating future misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epistle, pastorals Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
exhortation Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125, 184
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38, 73
fear Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
fear of death, of annihilation Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
fear of death, of punishment after death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
fear of death, plutarch distinguishes these Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
fears Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
fire purifying Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 187
frankness, contrasted with harsh criticism Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
frankness Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 104
friendship, three levels of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
friendship Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
galen Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
genre Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
gigante, marcello Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74, 104
gods, in lucretius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
gowers, emily Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74, 104
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
grief Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
hedonic calculus, and acquisition of wealth/property Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
hegesias, cyrenaic, death an escape Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
hell, eternity, non-eternity of Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 187
hermarchus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84, 104
history Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
homer Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
hope, approved by christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, aristotle, explains competitive pleasure, including those of debate Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, christian Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
hope, epicurus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, evaluated by plato Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
initiation Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
intertextuality Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 38
iphigenia/iphianassa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
irwin, terry Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
jerome Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
justice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34, 38
katabasis Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
labor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
lactantius Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
law Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
lucretius, epicurean, against fear of death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
lucretius, in tennyson Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
lucretius, labor in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
lucretius, victorian biofictional readings of Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
lucretius, wife lucilia Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
lucretius Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107, 147; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63; Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
lust Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
medicine, frankness compared to Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 104
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
metaphor Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
mourning Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 147
munro, h. a. j. Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
mystery cult Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
myth, and eschatology Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
myth, plutarchs use of Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
nature (personified) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
orpheus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99
palgrave, francis Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
pangs in epicureanism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 147
past, present, future, hope approved Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
pastoral epistles Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125, 184
pastorals Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
paul, st Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
philodemus Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 147
philodemus of gadara, condemnation of cynicism Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
philodemus of gadara, cynic influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
philodemus of gadara, depictions of anger Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
philodemus of gadara, on economics Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
philosopher, as physician Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
philosophical psychology guides education, aristotle, pleasures of philosophical debate connotes hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
philosophy Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
physician, philosopher as Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
plato, false hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, most pleasures mixed with distress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, pleasure and danger of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, pleasures and dangers of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
pleasure, pleasures of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
pleasure, these explain pleasures of competition Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
plutarch of chaeroneia, middle platonist, momentary self Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
polemics, anti-stoic, anti-epicurean Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
porphyry Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
posidonius, stoic, and anticipation (proendēmein) of misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237
proverbs, thessalonians, first Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
punishment, after death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
resurrection, of christ Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
satires (horace), treatment of frankness Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 104
scepticism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
schroeder, f. m. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
self, momentary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
self, self vs. constitution Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
seneca, the younger, stoic, momentary self Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
seneca, the younger, stoic, soul may survive for a while Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
seneca, the younger, stoic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
sisyphos Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 217
sisyphus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
skepticcism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
society Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
sophist Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
soul, corrupt Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
soul-body relationship, translocation Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
souls, and immortality Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
souls, destruction at death Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 147
spontaneity Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 34
stoicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
stoics, see under individual stoics, esp. chrysippus, whose views came to be seen already in antiquity as stoic orthodoxy, so that, conversely, views seen as orthodox tended to be ascribed to him, soul survives for a while Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
stoics/stoicism, long-windedness Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
suicide, encouraged, hegesias Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
superstitio, in lucretius epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
symmetry arguments Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 147
tantalus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 107
tarrant, richard Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84, 104
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
teles of megara Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
tennyson, alfred lord, annotations to text of lucretius Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
tennyson, alfred lord, biofictional reception of lucretius Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
tennyson, alfred lord, interest in mental instability Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
tennyson, alfred lord, lucretius Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 147
tertullian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
theodoret Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
therapy, techniques see esp. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237, 248
therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237, 248
time-lapse, effects of, emotions fade with time, because of reassessment Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237
time-lapse, effects of, familiarity in advance has same effect as fading Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237
tityos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 149
torquatus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 84
trajan Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
unconscious, cyrenaics Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236
underworld Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124, 149; Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 99; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
vespasian Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
vice Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 124
virgil Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38
virtue Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 125
weapon Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 184
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 236, 237, 248
zeno of sidon Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 74
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 38