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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 3.371
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Horace, Sermones, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.2.30-1.2.31, 1.2.33-1.2.35, 1.7, 2.1.72 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.7. for they will find, that almost all which concerns the Greeks happened not long ago; nay, one may say, is of yesterday only. I speak of the building of their cities, the invention of their arts, and the description of their laws; and as for their care about the writing down of their histories, it is very near the last thing they set about. 1.7. Now, the very same thing will I endeavor to do; for I will bring the Egyptians and the Phoenicians as my principal witnesses, because nobody can complain of their testimony as false on account that they are known to have borne the greatest ill will towards us,—I mean this as to the Egyptians, in general all of them, while of the Phoenicians it is known the Tyrians have been most of all in the same ill disposition towards us:
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.600-2.643, 2.645, 2.1001, 2.1039, 3.18-3.22, 5.111-5.112, 5.490-5.491, 5.622, 5.1204, 6.76, 6.286, 6.388, 6.644, 6.670, 6.1228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.174, 7.177 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.174. To the solitary man who talked to himself he remarked, You are not talking to a bad man. When some one twitted him on his old age, his reply was, I too am ready to depart; but when again I consider that I am in all points in good health and that I can still write and read, I am content to wait. We are told that he wrote down Zeno's lectures on oyster-shells and the blade-bones of oxen through lack of money to buy paper. Such was he; and yet, although Zeno had many other eminent disciples, he was able to succeed him in the headship of the school.He has left some very fine writings, which are as follows:of Time.of Zeno's Natural Philosophy, two books.Interpretations of Heraclitus, four books.De Sensu.of Art.A Reply to Democritus.A Reply to Aristarchus.A Reply to Herillus.of Impulse, two books. 7.177. 6. SPHAERUSAmongst those who after the death of Zeno became pupils of Cleanthes was Sphaerus of Bosporus, as already mentioned. After making considerable progress in his studies, he went to Alexandria to the court of King Ptolemy Philopator. One day when a discussion had arisen on the question whether the wise man could stoop to hold opinion, and Sphaerus had maintained that this was impossible, the king, wishing to refute him, ordered some waxen pomegranates to be put on the table. Sphaerus was taken in and the king cried out, You have given your assent to a presentation which is false. But Sphaerus was ready with a neat answer. I assented not to the proposition that they are pomegranates, but to another, that there are good grounds for thinking them to be pomegranates. Certainty of presentation and reasonable probability are two totally different things. Mnesistratus having accused him of denying that Ptolemy was a king, his reply was, Being of such quality as he is, Ptolemy is indeed a king.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
anecdote Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
aristotle Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
cognition/cognitive Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
death/tod Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97, 111
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
diction, grand Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
epicureanism Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
epicurus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
exercise/übung Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
golden mean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
heraclitus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
lucretius Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
mirror-/symmetry-argument Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
plato Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
rationality/irrationality Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
senses Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
skepticism, academic Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
socrates Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
soul (anima/psyché/seele) Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97, 111
stoicism Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 24
templum' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
αἶνος Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74