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7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 3.31-3.93
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nam quod saepe homines morbos magis esse timendosFor as to what men sometimes will affirm: That more than Tartarus (the realm of death) They fear diseases and a life of shame, And know the substance of the soul is blood, Or rather wind (if haply thus their whim), And so need naught of this our science, then Thou well may'st note from what's to follow now That more for glory do they braggart forth Than for belief. For mark these very same: Exiles from country, fugitives afar From sight of men, with charges foul attaint, Abased with every wretchedness, they yet Live, and where'er the wretches come, they yet Make the ancestral sacrifices there, Butcher the black sheep, and to gods below Offer the honours, and in bitter case Turn much more keenly to religion. Wherefore, it's surer testing of a man In doubtful perils- mark him as he is Amid adversities; for then alone Are the true voices conjured from his breast, The mask off-stripped, reality behind. And greed, again, and the blind lust of honours Which force poor wretches past the bounds of law, And, oft allies and ministers of crime, To push through nights and days with hugest toil To rise untrammelled to the peaks of power- These wounds of life in no mean part are kept Festering and open by this fright of death. For ever we see fierce Want and foul Disgrace Dislodged afar from secure life and sweet, Like huddling Shapes before the doors of death. And whilst, from these, men wish to scape afar, Driven by false terror, and afar remove, With civic blood a fortune they amass, They double their riches, greedy, heapers-up Of corpse on corpse they have a cruel laugh For the sad burial of a brother-born, And hatred and fear of tables of their kin. Likewise, through this same terror, envy oft Makes them to peak because before their eyes That man is lordly, that man gazed upon Who walks begirt with honour glorious, Whilst they in filth and darkness roll around; Some perish away for statues and a name, And oft to that degree, from fright of death, Will hate of living and beholding light Take hold on humankind that they inflict Their own destruction with a gloomy heart- Forgetful that this fear is font of cares, This fear the plague upon their sense of shame, And this that breaks the ties of comradry And oversets all reverence and faith, Mid direst slaughter. For long ere to-day Often were traitors to country and dear parents Through quest to shun the realms of Acheron. For just as children tremble and fear all In the viewless dark, so even we at times Dread in the light so many things that be No whit more fearsome than what children feign, Shuddering, will be upon them in the dark. This terror, then, this darkness of the mind, Not sunrise with its flaring spokes of light, Nor glittering arrows of morning sun disperse, But only nature's aspect and her law. NATURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE MIND First, then, I say, the mind which oft we call The intellect, wherein is seated life's Counsel and regimen, is part no less Of man than hand and foot and eyes are parts Of one whole breathing creature. [But some hold] That sense of mind is in no fixed part seated, But is of body some one vital state,- Named "harmony" by Greeks, because thereby We live with sense, though intellect be not In any part: as oft the body is said To have good health (when health, however, 's not One part of him who has it), so they place The sense of mind in no fixed part of man. Mightily, diversly, meseems they err. Often the body palpable and seen Sickens, while yet in some invisible part We feel a pleasure; oft the other way, A miserable in mind feels pleasure still Throughout his body- quite the same as when A foot may pain without a pain in head. Besides, when these our limbs are given o'er To gentle sleep and lies the burdened frame At random void of sense, a something else Is yet within us, which upon that time Bestirs itself in many a wise, receiving All motions of joy and phantom cares of heart. Now, for to see that in man's members dwells Also the soul, and body ne'er is wont To feel sensation by a "harmony" Take this in chief: the fact that life remains Oft in our limbs, when much of body's gone; Yet that same life, when particles of heat, Though few, have scattered been, and through the mouth Air has been given forth abroad, forthwith Forever deserts the veins, and leaves the bones. Thus mayst thou know that not all particles Perform like parts, nor in like manner all Are props of weal and safety: rather those- The seeds of wind and exhalations warm- Take care that in our members life remains. Therefore a vital heat and wind there is Within the very body, which at death Deserts our frames. And so, since nature of mind And even of soul is found to be, as 'twere, A part of man, give over "harmony"- Name to musicians brought from Helicon,- Unless themselves they filched it otherwise, To serve for what was lacking name till then. Whate'er it be, they're welcome to it- thou, Hearken my other maxims.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

32c. the sweet and cheering hope of pleasant things to come, the fearful and woful expectation of painful things to come. Pro. Yes, indeed, this is another kind of pleasure and pain, which belongs to the soul itself, apart from the body, and arises through expectation. Soc. You are right. I think that in these two kinds, both of which are, in my opinion, pure, and not formed by mixture of pain and pleasure, the truth about pleasure will be made manifest
2. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.32-3.33, 3.52, 3.58, 5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.32. Sed est, isdem de rebus quod dici possit subtilius, si prius Epicuri sententiam viderimus. qui censet Epic. fr. 444 necesse esse omnis in aegritudine esse, qui se in malis esse arbitrentur, sive illa ante provisa et expectata sint sive inveteraverint. nam neque vetustate minui mala nec fieri praemeditata leviora, stultamque etiam esse meditationem futuri mali aut fortasse ne futuri quidem: satis esse odiosum malum omne, cum venisset; cum venisset ex conv. K 2 qui autem semper cogitavisset accidere posse aliquid adversi, ei fieri illud sempiternum malum; si vero ne futurum quidem sit, sit ex si V c frustra suscipi miseriam voluntariam; voluntariam add. GR 1 in fine pag. ita semper angi aut accipiendo aut cogitando malo. 3.33. Levationem autem aegritudinis in duabus rebus ponit, avocatione a cogitanda molestia et revocatione revocationem GKV 1 ad contemplandas voluptates. parere pareri GR 1 ( corr. 1 ) V 1 ( corr. 2 ) enim censet animum rationi posse et, quo illa ducat, sequi. vetat igitur ratio intueri molestias, abstrahit ab acerbis cogitationibus, hebetem habetem V 1 aciem ad miserias contemplandas facit; facit add. V c ( ante aciem We. ft. rectius cf. docere 220,13 sed cf. off. 1, 12 extr. al. ) om. cett. a quibus cum cecinit cecidit X corr. 2 receptui, inpellit receptuimpellit VHK c (receptaimp. K 1 )G 2 (receptum pellit 1 ) receptū impellit R rursum et incitat ad conspiciendas totaque mente contrectandas contractandas K ( ex -tes 1 ) H varias voluptates, vetat... 335, 4 voluptates H quibus ille et praeteritarum memoria et spe consequentium sapientis vitam refertam putat. refert amputat G 1 R 1 V 1 Haec nostro more nos diximus, Epicurii epicurei R c K 2 dicunt suo; sed quae quae ex qui V 2 dicant, videamus, quo modo, neglegamus. 3.52. qui tum aegritudinem censent existere, si necopinato quid evenerit. est id quidem magnum, ut supra supra p. 332, 6 dixi; etiam Chrysippo Chrys. fr. eth. 417 crysippo X ita videri scio, quod provisum ante non sit, id ferire ferire fieri X corr. V c aut 1 vehementius; sed non sunt in hoc hic in hoc G ( exp. 2 ) omnia. quamquam hostium et ante hostium add. V 2 non male repens adventus advetus G 1 R 1 V 1 magis aliquanto aliquando X corr. V c aut 1 conturbat quam expectatus, et maris subita tempestas quam ante provisa terret provisitaret K 1 navigantes vehementius, et eius modi sunt pleraque. sed cum diligenter necopinatorum naturam consideres, nihil aliud reperias repperias G R 1 V nisi omnia videri subita maiora, et quidem ob duas causas, primum quod, quanta sint quae accidunt, post accidunt V c in mg. add. : et qualia, cum repente accidunt ( non inepte cf. p. 345, 21 ) considerandi spatium non datur, deinde, cum cum tum G videtur praecaveri potuisse, si provisum esset, quasi culpa contractum malum aegritudinem acriorem facit. 3.58. similiter commemorandis exemplis orbitates quoque liberum liberorum V c praedicantur, eorumque, eorum quoque K 1 qui gravius ferunt, luctus aliorum exemplis leniuntur. sic perpessio ceterorum facit, ut ea quae acciderint multo minora maiora ex minora V c quam quanta sint existimata, videantur. ita fit, sensim cogitantibus ut, quantum sit ementita opinio, appareat. atque hoc idem et Telamo ille declarat: ego cum genui et Theseus: futuras mecum commentabar miserias tum morituros scivi et ei rei sustuli add. R 2, moriturum scivi V 3 et Anaxagoras: sciebam me genuisse mortalem. cf. p. 332, 9 sqq. hi enim omnes diu cogitantes de rebus humanis intellegebant eas nequaquam pro opinione volgi esse extimescendas. extimescendas KR 1 existimescendas R c G existimiscendas G 1 e corr. V et mihi quidem videtur idem fere accidere is qui ante meditantur, quod is quibus medetur dies, nisi quod ratio ratio V ratione GKR ( unde in hoc quae- dam 2? ) quaedam sanat illos, hos ipsa natura intellecto eo quod rem continet, illud illud continet X trp. B malum, quod opinatum sit esse maxumum, nequaquam esse tantum, ut vitam beatam possit evertere. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.39, 1.54-1.61, 1.75-1.79, 1.127-1.145, 1.159-1.214, 2.1-2.66, 2.75-2.79, 2.333-2.380, 2.443, 2.478-2.521, 2.700-2.717, 2.991-2.1022, 2.1116-2.1117, 2.1130, 3.1-3.2, 3.12-3.13, 3.22, 3.32-3.93, 3.746-3.747, 3.830-3.1094, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.489-4.495, 5.10-5.12, 5.54-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.791-5.792, 5.826-5.836, 5.1058, 5.1233-5.1235, 5.1457, 6.1-6.80, 6.86, 6.90-6.95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop
6. Juvenal, Satires, 7.197-7.198 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 26.6-26.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 121.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 78

10. Epicurus, Vatican Sayings, 27

11. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
anger, pleasurable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
anticipation of misfortune, posidonius Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
anticipation of misfortune, rejected by epicureans Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
atoms, and teleology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
competition, aristotle, pleasure of competition comes from hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
consolation writings, hope of continuation Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
democritus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
dido Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
epicureans, against fear of death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
epicureans, hope, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus, memorization of his doctrines Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus, rejects anticipating future misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
epistemology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
fear Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
fear of death, of annihilation Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
fear of death, of punishment after death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
fear of death, plutarch distinguishes these Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
free will Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
homer Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
hope, approved by christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, aristotle, explains competitive pleasure, including those of debate Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, epicurus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
hope, evaluated by plato Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
iopas Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, laws of nature in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
odysseus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
past, present, future, hope approved Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
paul, st Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
phaeacians Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
philosophical psychology guides education, aristotle, pleasures of philosophical debate connotes hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, false hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, most pleasures mixed with distress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, pleasure and danger of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plato, pleasures and dangers of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
pleasure, pleasures of hope Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
pleasure, these explain pleasures of competition Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
plutarch of chaeroneia, middle platonist, momentary self Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
posidonius, stoic, and anticipation (proendēmein) of misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
punishment, after death Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
reason Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
self, momentary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
self, self vs. constitution Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
seneca, the younger, stoic, momentary self Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248
seneca, the younger, stoic, soul may survive for a while Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
seneca, the younger, stoic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
stoicism, sun, the size of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
stoics, see under individual stoics, esp. chrysippus, whose views came to be seen already in antiquity as stoic orthodoxy, so that, conversely, views seen as orthodox tended to be ascribed to him, soul survives for a while Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
therapy, techniques see esp. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237, 248
time-lapse, effects of, emotions fade with time, because of reassessment Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
time-lapse, effects of, familiarity in advance has same effect as fading Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 106
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
virgil Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 64
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 237
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 248