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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 3.296-3.307
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14 results
1. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 368-371, 367 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

367. ἰπούμενος ῥίζαισιν Αἰτναίαις ὕπο·
2. Aristophanes, Clouds, 347-350, 346 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

346. ἤδη ποτ' ἀναβλέψας εἶδες νεφέλην κενταύρῳ ὁμοίαν
3. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.4.11-1.4.14, 4.3, 4.3.8-4.3.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.11. I assure you, that if I believed that the gods pay any heed to man, I would not neglect them. Then do you think them unheeding? In the first place, man is the only living creature that they have caused to stand upright; and the upright position gives him a wider range of vision in front and a better view of things above, and exposes him less to injury. Secondly, to grovelling creatures they have given feet that afford only the power of moving, whereas they have endowed man with hands, which are the instruments to which we chiefly owe our greater happiness. 1.4.12. Again, though all creatures have a tongue, the tongue of man alone has been formed by them to be capable of contact with different parts of the mouth, so as to enable us to articulate the voice and express all our wants to one another. Once more, for all other creatures they have prescribed a fixed season of sexual indulgence; in our case the only time limit they have set is old age. 1.4.13. Nor was the deity content to care for man’s body. What is of yet higher moment, he has implanted in him the noblest type of soul. For in the first place what other creature’s soul has apprehended the existence of gods who set in order the universe, greatest and fairest of things? And what race of living things other than man worships gods? And what soul is more apt than man’s to make provision against hunger and thirst, cold and heat, to relieve sickness and promote health, to acquire knowledge by toil, and to remember accurately all that is heard, seen, or learned? 1.4.14. For is it not obvious to you that, in comparison with the other animals, men live like gods, by nature peerless both in body and in soul? For with a man’s reason and the body of an ox we could not carry out our wishes, and the possession of hands without reason is of little worth. Do you, then, having received the two most precious gifts, yet think that the gods take no care of you? What are they to do, to make you believe that they are heedful of you? 4.3.8. Think again how the sun, when past the winter solstice, approaches, ripening some things and withering others, whose time is over; and having accomplished this, approaches no nearer, but turns away, careful not to harm us by excess of heat; and when once again in his retreat he reaches the point where it is clear to ourselves, that if he goes further away, we shall be frozen with the cold, back he turns once more and draws near and revolves in that region of the heavens where he can best serve us. Yes, verily, these things do seem to be done for the sake of mankind. 4.3.9. And again, since it is evident that we could not endure the heat or the cold if it came suddenly, Cyropaedia VI. ii. 29. the sun’s approach and retreat are so gradual that we arrive at the one or the other extreme imperceptibly. For myself, exclaimed Euthydemus, I begin to doubt whether after all the gods are occupied in any other work than the service of man. The one difficulty I feel is that the lower animals also enjoy these blessings. 4.3.10. Yes, replied Socrates, and is it not evident that they too receive life and food for the sake of man? For what creature reaps so many benefits as man from goats and sheep and horses and oxen and asses and the other animals? He owes more to them, in my opinion, than to the fruits of the earth. At the least they are not less valuable to him for food and commerce; in fact a large portion of mankind does not use the products of the earth for food, but lives on the milk and cheese and flesh they get from live stock. Moreover, all men tame and domesticate the useful kinds of animals, and make them their fellow-workers in war and many other undertakings. There too I agree with you, seeing that animals far stronger than man become so entirely subject to him that he puts them to any use he chooses. 4.3.11. Think again of the multitude of things beautiful and useful and their infinite variety, and how the gods have endowed man with senses adapted for the perception of every kind, so that there is nothing good that we cannot enjoy; and again, how they have implanted in us the faculty of reasoning, whereby we are able to reason about the objects of our perceptions and to commit them to memory, and so come to know what advantage every kind can yield, and devise many means of enjoying the good and driving away the bad; 4.3.12. and think of the power of expression, which enables us to impart to one another all good things by teaching and to take our share of them, to enact laws and to administer states. Truly, Socrates, it does appear that the gods devote much care to man. Yet again, in so far as we are powerless of ourselves to foresee what is expedient for the future, Cyropaedia I. vi. 46. the gods lend us their aid, revealing the issues by divination to inquirers, and teaching them how to obtain the best results. With you, Socrates, they seem to deal even more friendly than with other men, if it is true that, even unasked, they warn you by signs what to do and what not to do.
4. Cicero, Academica, 2.120 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.2, 1.23, 2.5, 2.154-2.167 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. As regards the present subject, for example, most thinkers have affirmed that the gods exist, and this is the most probable view and the one to which we are all led by nature's guidance; but Protagoras declared himself uncertain, and Diagoras of Melos and Theodorus of Cyrene held that there are no gods at all. Moreover, the upholders of the divine existence differ and disagree so widely, that it would be a troublesome task to recount their opinions. Many views are put forward about the outward form of the gods, their dwelling-places and abodes, and mode of life, and these topics are debated with the widest variety of opinion among philosophers; but as to the question upon which the whole issue of the dispute principally turns, whether the gods are entirely idle and inactive, taking no part at all in the direction and government of the world, or whether on the contrary all things both were created and ordered by them in the beginning and are controlled and kept in motion by them throughout eternity, here there is the greatest disagreement of all. And until this issue is decided, mankind must continue to labour under the profoundest uncertainty, and to be in ignorance about matters of the highest moment. 1.23. Or were these beauties designed for the sake of men, as your school usually maintains? For the sake of wise men? If so, all this vast effort of construction took place on account of a handful of people. For the sake of fools then? But in the first place there was no reason for god to do a service to the wicked and secondly, what good did he do? inasmuch as all fools are beyond question extremely miserable, precisely because they are fools (for what can be mentioned more miserable than folly?), and in the second place because there are so many troubles in life that, though wise men can assuage them by balancing against them life's advantages, fools can neither avoid their approach nor endure their presence. Those on the other hand who said that the world is itself endowed with life and with wisdom, failed entirely to discern what shape the nature of an intelligent living being could conceivably possess. I will touch on this a little later; 2.5. how is the latter fact more evident than the former? Nothing but the presence in our minds of a firmly grasped concept of the deity could account for the stability and permanence of our belief in him, a belief which is only strengthened by the passage of the ages and grows more deeply rooted with each successive generation of mankind. In every other case we see that fictitious and unfounded opinions have dwindled away with lapse of time. Who believes that the Hippocentaur or the Chimaera ever existed? Where can you find an old wife senseless enough to be afraid of the monsters of the lower world that were once believed in? The years obliterate the inventions of the imagination, but confirm the judgements of nature. "Hence both in our own nation and among all others reverence for the gods and respect for religion grow continually stronger and more profound. 2.154. It remains for me to show, in coming finally to a conclusion, that all the things in this world which men employ have been created and provided for the sake of men. "In the first place the world itself was created for the sake of gods and men, and the things that it contains were provided and contrived for the enjoyment of men. For the world is as it were the common dwelling-place of gods and men, or the city that belongs to both; for they alone have the use of reason and live by justice and by law. As therefore Athens and Sparta must be deemed to have been founded for the sake of the Athenians and the Spartans, and all the things contained in those cities are rightly said to belong to those peoples, so whatever things are contained in all the world must be deemed to belong to the gods and to men. 2.155. Again the revolutions of the sun and moon no other heavenly bodies, although also contributing to the maintece of the structure of the world, nevertheless also afford a spectacle for man to behold; for there is no sight of which it is more impossible to grow weary, none more beautiful nor displaying a more surpassing wisdom and skill; for by measuring the courses of the stars we know when the seasons will come round, and when their variations and changes will occur; and if these things are known to men alone, they must be judged to have been created for the sake of men. 2.156. Then the earth, teeming with grain and vegetables of various kinds, which she pours forth in lavish abundance — does she appear to give birth to this produce for the sake of the wild beasts or for the sake of men? What shall I say of the vines and olives, whose bounteous and delightful fruits do not concern the lower animals at all? In fact the beasts of the field are entirely ignorant of the arts of sowing and cultivating, and of reaping and gathering the fruits of the earth in due season and storing them in garners; all these products are both enjoyed and tended by men. 2.157. Just as therefore we are bound to say that lyres and flutes were made for the sake of those who can use them, so it must be agreed that the things of which I have spoken have been provided for those only who make use of them, and even if some portion of them is filched or plundered by some of the lower animals, we shall not admit that they were created for the sake of these animals also. Men do not store up corn for the sake of mice and ants but for their wives and children and households; so the animals share these fruits of the earth only by stealth as I have said, whereas the masters enjoy them openly and freely. 2.158. It must therefore be admitted that all this abundance was provided for the sake of men, unless perchance the bounteous plenty and variety of our orchard fruit and the delightfulness not only of its flavour but also of its scent and appearance lead us to doubt whether nature intended this gift for man alone! So far is it from being true that the furs of the earth were provided for the sake of animals as well as men, that the animals themselves, as we may see, were created for the benefit of men. What other use have sheep save that their fleeces are dressed and woven into clothing for men? and in fact they could not have been reared nor sustained nor have produced anything of value without man's care and tendance. Then think of the dog, with its trusty watchfulness, its fawning affection for its master and hatred of strangers, its incredible keenness of scent in following a trail and its eagerness in hunting — what do these qualities imply except that they were created to serve the conveniences of men? 2.159. Why should I speak of oxen? the very shape of their backs makes it clear that they were not destined to carry burdens, whereas their necks were born for the yoke and their broad powerful shoulders for drawing the plough. And as it was by their means that the earth was brought under tillage by breaking up its clods, no violence was ever used towards them, so the poets say, by the men of that Golden Age; But then the iron race sprang into being, And first did dare to forge the deadly sword, And taste the ox its hand had tamed to bondage. So valuable was deemed the service that man received from oxen that to eat their flesh was held a crime. "It would be a long story to tell of the services rendered by mules and asses, which were undoubtedly created for the use of men. 2.160. As for the pig, it can only furnish food; indeed Chrysippus actually says that its soul was given it to serve as salt and keep it from putrefaction; and because this animal was fitted for the food of man, nature made it the most prolific of all her offspring. Why should I speak of the teeming swarms of delicious fish? or of birds, which afford us so much pleasure that our Stoic Providence appears to have been at times a disciple of Epicurus? and they could not even be caught save by man's intelligence and cunning; — although some birds, birds of flight and birds of utterance as our augurs call them, we believe to have been created for the purpose of giving omens. 2.161. The great beasts of the forest again we take by hunting, both for food and in order to exercise ourselves in the mimic warfare of the chase, and also, as in the case of elephants, to train and discipline them for our employment, and to procure from their busy a variety of medicines for diseases and wounds, as also we do from certain roots and herbs whose values we have learnt by long-continued use and trial. Let the mind's eye survey the whole earth and all the seas, and you will behold now fruitful plains of measureless extent and mountains thickly clad with forests and pastures filled with flocks, now vessels sailing with marvellous swiftness across the sea. 2.162. Nor only on the surface of the earth, but also in its darkest recesses there lurks an abundance of commodities which were created for men's use and which men alone discover. "The next subject is one which each of you perhaps will seize upon for censure, Cotta because Carneades used to enjoy tilting at the Stoics, Velleius because nothing provokes the ridicule of Epicurus so much as the art of prophecy; but in my view it affords the very strongest proof that man's welfare is studied by divine providence. I refer of course to Divination, which we see practised in many regions and upon various matters and occasions both private and more especially public. 2.163. Many observations are made by those who inspect the victims at sacrifices, many events are foreseen by augurs or revealed in oracles and prophecies, dreams and portents, a knowledge of which has often led to the acquisition of many things gratifying men's wishes and requirements, and also to the avoidance of many dangers. This power or art or instinct therefore has clearly been bestowed by the immortal gods on man, and on no other creature, for the ascertainment of future events. "And if perchance these arguments separately fail to convince you, nevertheless in combination their collective weight will be bound to do so. 2.164. Nor is the care and providence of the immortal gods bestowed only upon the human race in its entirety, but it is also wont to be extended to individuals. We may narrow down the entirety of the human race and bring it gradually down to smaller and smaller groups, and finally to single individuals. For if we believe, for the reasons that we have spoken of before, that the gods care for all human beings everywhere in every coast and region of the lands remote from this continent in which we dwell, then they care also for the men who inhabit with us these lands between the sunrise and the sunset. 2.165. But if they care for these who inhabit that sort of vast island which we call the round earth, they also care for those who occupy continue divisions of that island, Europe, Asia and Africa. Therefore they also cherish the divisions of those divisions, for instance Rome, Athens, Sparta and Rhodes; and they cherish the individual citizens of those cities regarded separately from the whole body collectively, for example, Curius, Fabricius and Coruncanius in the war with Pyrrhus, Calatinus, Duellius, Metellus and Lutatius in the First Punic War, and Maximus, Marcellus and Africanus in the Second, and at a later date Paulus, Gracchus and Cato, or in our fathers' time Scipio and Laelius; and many remarkable men besides both our own country and Greece have given birth to, none of whom would conceivably have been what he was save by god's aid. 2.166. It was this reason which drove the poets, and especially Homer, to attach to their chief heroes, Ulysses, Diomede, Agamemnon or Achilles, certain gods as the companions of their perils and adventures; moreover the gods have often appeared to men in person, as in the cases which I have mentioned above, so testifying that they care both for communities and for individuals. And the same is proved by the portents of future occurrences that are vouchsafed to men sometimes when they are asleep and sometimes when they are awake. Moreover we receive a number of warnings by means of signs and of the entrails of victims, and by many other things that long-continued usage has noted in such a manner as to create the art of divination. 2.167. Therefore no great man ever existed who did not enjoy some portion of divine inspiration. Nor yet is this argument to be deprived by pointing to cases where a man's cornfields or vineyards have been damaged by a storm, or an accident has robbed him of some commodity of value, and inferring that the victim of one of these misfortunes is the object of god's hatred or neglect. The gods attend to great matters; they neglect small ones. Now great men always prosper in all their affairs, assuming that the teachers of our school and Socrates, the prince of philosophy, have satisfactorily discoursed upon the bounteous abundance of wealth that virtue bestows.
6. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.10-1.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.10. num nunc ex. num K 1 te illa terrent, triceps apud inferos Cerberus, Cocyti coyc ti R 1 fremitus, travectio traiectio ex trav. K 1 transv. V c mg. ('al trans') g Trag. inc.111 Acherontis, mento summam aquam aquam trisyll. cf. Lachm. ad Lucr. 6, 552 quam Nonii L 1 A A attingens amnem Bue. adtinget ( vel -it) senextus Nonii L 1 A A enectus siti Tantalus? summam... tantalus Non. 401,29 enectus ... Tantalus Prisc, GL 2, 470, 18 tantulus X ( corr. K 2 ) Nonii et Prisciani pars tum illud, quod Sisyphus sisyphius X ( sed 2. eras. in V. sis. K 1 aut c ) Nonii pars versat versus? cf. Marx ad Lucil. 1375 saxum sudans nitendo neque proficit hilum? tum ... hlium Non. 121,4; 353, 8. fortasse etiam inexorabiles iudices, Minos et Rhadamanthus? apud quos nec te L. Crassus defendet defendet om. RK 1 ( add. 2 ) nec M. Antonius nec, quoniam apud Graecos iudices res agetur, poteris adhibere Demosthenen; demostenen K tibi ipsi pro te erit maxima corona causa dicenda. dicenda causa K haec fortasse metuis et idcirco mortem censes esse sempiternum malum. Adeone me delirare censes, ut ista esse credam? An tu ante G 1 haec non an tu an non ( 2. an in r. ) V 1? credis? Minime vero. Male hercule narras. Cur? quaeso. Quia disertus dissertus KR 1 esse possem, si contra ista dicerem. Quis enim non in eius modi causa? aut quid negotii est haec poëtarum et pictorum portenta convincere? aut convincere Non. 375, 29 1.11. Atqui pleni libri sunt contra ista ipsa disserentium dissenentium G 1 (dissotium corr. G 1? ) RV 1 ( corr. ipse? ) diserentium K philosophorum. Inepte sane. quis enim est est om. K 1, add. c tam excors, quem ista moveant? commoveant V 2 Si ergo apud inferos miseri non sunt, ne sunt quidem apud inferos ulli. Ita prorsus prossus G existimo. Ubi sunt Inde ab ubi - 223, 24 iam sunt multa in K madore corrupta ergo i, quos miseros dicis, aut quem locum incolunt? si enim sunt, nusquam esse non possunt. Ego vero nusquam esse illos puto. Igitur ne esse quidem? Prorsus isto modo, et tamen miseros miseros cf. Serv. Aen. 4, 20 ob id ipsum quidem, quidem om. K quia nulli sint.
7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.49, 1.62-1.79, 1.136-1.145, 1.188-1.190, 1.722-1.725, 1.736-1.739, 2.180-2.181, 2.263-2.265, 3.94-3.255, 3.260, 3.262-3.295, 3.297-3.336, 3.350-3.369, 3.417-3.869, 4.129-4.140, 4.547-4.548, 4.638-4.641, 4.678-4.683, 4.714-4.721, 4.732-4.748, 4.962-4.1036, 4.1058-4.1287, 5.113-5.121, 5.195-5.234, 5.878-5.889, 5.920-5.924, 5.1033-5.1040, 6.680-6.693, 6.777-6.778, 6.786-6.787, 6.821-6.823 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 3.5.33-3.5.34, 4.7.11-4.7.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.674-7.675 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.471-1.473 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy:
11. Diogenes of Oenoanda, Fragments, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.3.6-1.3.7, 2.1.3-2.1.4, 2.2.1-2.2.2, 2.4.1-2.4.2, 2.27.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 24.18, 82.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Lactantius, De Ira Dei, 13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
aeschylus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
air / wind, as a constituent element of the human body Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
akrasia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
alexander the great Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
anger / irascibility, rage (θύμος) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 186
animals, danger of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91, 92, 123
animals, survival/extinction of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91, 92
anthropocentrism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
aristotle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 92
asclepiades of bithynia Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
augustus, anger Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
avernus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
body, can education counteract tendency of body? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
body, contribution of body to emotion and its therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
body and soul, interaction King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 221
body parts, mouth Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
calcidius, christian platonist, body makes children thoughtless Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
cognition/cognitive Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
cyclopes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
death/tod Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97, 111
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
disease, sudden occurrence of Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
education, doctrina Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
education, paideia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
education, paideusis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
education Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
emotions, per contra, aristotle, galen, emotions cannot be understood without physical basis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
epilepsy, and its medical explanation by lucretius Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
epilepsy Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
exercise/übung Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
flesh King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 221
fluids in/of the body, phlegm Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
humoural medicine Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
imagery, gigantomachy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
infancy/children Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
intoxication Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 186
irascibility Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 186
italy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
juno, anger of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91, 92, 123
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 92
lucretius, epicurean, apatheia impossible Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
lucretius, epicurean, teaching (doctrina) can override body only to some extent Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
lucretius Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 186
maximalists Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 186
medical, intertexts Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 82
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
mirror-/symmetry-argument Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
ovid, akrasia in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
palaephatus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
perception King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 221
philodemus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
plague Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
platonism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
polemo Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
primitivism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 92
proclus, neoplatonist, as plato timaeus agrees (paideusis) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
proclus, neoplatonist, body can impede but not assist the soul Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
proclus, neoplatonist, education (paideia) is what assists the soul Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
proclus, neoplatonist, effect of soul on body an illusion, despite timaeus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
proclus, neoplatonist, only activities, not essence, of soul can be affected Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
prometheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
rationality/irrationality Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 111
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
scepticism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
seneca, three-stage analysis of irascibility in de ira Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
senses Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97
socrates Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
soul (anima/psyché/seele) Fuhrer and Soldo, Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (2024) 97, 111
stoicism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
stoics/stoicism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 277
teleology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
typhoeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 123
universe, organization, species King, Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2006) 221
velleius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 156
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
xenophanes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 265
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123