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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.991-2.997
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26-1.28, 2.7, 9.19, 24.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.26. וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.27. וַיִּבְרָא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם בְּצַלְמוֹ בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים בָּרָא אֹתוֹ זָכָר וּנְקֵבָה בָּרָא אֹתָם׃ 1.28. וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם אֱלֹהִים וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וְכִבְשֻׁהָ וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבְכָל־חַיָּה הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 2.7. וַיִּיצֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן־הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה׃ 9.19. שְׁלֹשָׁה אֵלֶּה בְּנֵי־נֹחַ וּמֵאֵלֶּה נָפְצָה כָל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 24.7. יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי הַשָּׁמַיִם אֲשֶׁר לְקָחַנִי מִבֵּית אָבִי וּמֵאֶרֶץ מוֹלַדְתִּי וַאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר־לִי וַאֲשֶׁר נִשְׁבַּע־לִי לֵאמֹר לְזַרְעֲךָ אֶתֵּן אֶת־הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת הוּא יִשְׁלַח מַלְאָכוֹ לְפָנֶיךָ וְלָקַחְתָּ אִשָּׁה לִבְנִי מִשָּׁם׃ 1.26. And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’" 1.27. And God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them." 1.28. And God blessed them; and God said unto them: ‘Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that creepeth upon the earth.’" 2.7. Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul." 9.19. These three were the sons of Noah, and of these was the whole earth overspread." 24.7. The LORD, the God of heaven, who took me from my father’s house, and from the land of my nativity, and who spoke unto me, and who swore unto me, saying: Unto thy seed will I give this land; He will send His angel before thee, and thou shalt take a wife for my son from thence."
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 300-301, 299 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

299. I tell you things of great utility
3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 9.43-9.46 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1345 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1345. For the deity, if he be really such, has no wants; these are miserable tales of the poets. But I, for all my piteous plight, reflected whether I should let myself be branded as a coward for giving up my life. For whoever does not withstand disaster
5. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

508a. and gods and men are held together by communion and friendship, by orderliness, temperance, and justice; and that is the reason, my friend, why they call the whole of this world by the name of order, not of disorder or dissoluteness. Now you, as it seems to me, do not give proper attention to this, for all your cleverness, but have failed to observe the great power of geometrical equality amongst both gods and men: you hold that self-advantage is what one ought to practice, because you neglect geometry. Very well: either we must refute this statement, that it is by the possession
6. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

320d. And when to these also came their destined time to be created, the gods moulded their forms within the earth, of a mixture made of earth and fire and all substances that are compounded with fire and earth. When they were about to bring these creatures to light, they charged Prometheus and Epimetheus to deal to each the equipment of his proper faculty. Epimetheus besought Prometheus that he might do the dealing himself; And when I have dealt, he said, you shall examine.
7. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

27a. keep silence in my turn and hearken. Crit. Consider now, Socrates, the order of the feast as we have arranged it. Seeing that Timaeus is our best astronomer and has made it his special task to learn about the nature of the Universe, it seemed good to us that he should speak first, beginning with the origin of the Cosmos and ending with the generation of mankind. After him I am to follow, taking over from him mankind, already as it were created by his speech, and taking over from you
8. Aristotle, Meteorology, 1.12 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 7.23, 14.35 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7.23. Therefore the Creator of the world, who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things, will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again, since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws.' 14.35. O Lord of all, who hast need of nothing, thou wast pleased that there be a temple for thy habitation among us;'
10. Septuagint, Judith, 9.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

9.12. Hear, O hear me, God of my father, God of the inheritance of Israel, Lord of heaven and earth, Creator of the waters, King of all thy creation, hear my prayer!
11. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 9.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.9. With thee is wisdom, who knows thy works and was present when thou didst make the world,and who understand what is pleasing in thy sight and what is right according to thy commandments.
12. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 5.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.25. Therefore we do not eat defiling food; for since we believe that the law was established by God, we know that in the nature of things the Creator of the world in giving us the law has shown sympathy toward us.
13. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.10-1.20, 1.55-1.57, 1.159-1.214, 1.249-1.270, 2.75-2.79, 2.333-2.380, 2.443, 2.478-2.521, 2.569-2.580, 2.589-2.599, 2.644-2.654, 2.700-2.717, 2.992-2.1022, 2.1116-2.1117, 2.1130, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.31-3.33, 3.746-3.747, 3.931-3.949, 4.26-4.28, 4.489-4.495, 5.195-5.234, 5.252, 5.389, 5.411-5.415, 5.783-5.805, 5.821-5.836, 5.925-5.926, 5.1058, 5.1233-5.1235, 5.1252-5.1257, 5.1457, 6.379-6.422, 6.616-6.622, 6.703-6.711, 6.840-6.878 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Fasti, 6.251, 6.253-6.256 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.251. I was rapt in prayer: I felt the heavenly deity 6.253. Not that I saw you, goddess (away with poets’ lies!) 6.254. Nor were you to be looked on by any man: 6.255. But I knew what I’d not known, and the error 6.256. I’d held to were corrected without instruction.
15. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.724-6.751 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.724. Harries them thus? What wailing smites the air?” 6.725. To whom the Sibyl, “Far-famed prince of Troy 6.726. The feet of innocence may never pass 6.727. Into this house of sin. But Hecate 6.728. When o'er th' Avernian groves she gave me power 6.729. Taught me what penalties the gods decree 6.730. And showed me all. There Cretan Rhadamanth 6.731. His kingdom keeps, and from unpitying throne 6.732. Chastises and lays bare the secret sins 6.733. of mortals who, exulting in vain guile 6.734. Elude till death, their expiation due. 6.735. There, armed forever with her vengeful scourge 6.736. Tisiphone, with menace and affront 6.737. The guilty swarm pursues; in her left hand 6.738. She lifts her angered serpents, while she calls 6.739. A troop of sister-furies fierce as she. 6.740. Then, grating loud on hinge of sickening sound 6.741. Hell's portals open wide. 0, dost thou see 6.742. What sentinel upon that threshold sits 6.744. Far, far within the dragon Hydra broods 6.745. With half a hundred mouths, gaping and black; 6.746. And Tartarus slopes downward to the dark 6.747. Twice the whole space that in the realms of light 6.748. Th' Olympian heaven above our earth aspires. — 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 6.750. Roll lightning-blasted in the gulf profound; 6.751. The twin Aloidae Aloïdae , colossal shades
17. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63, 1.86-1.93, 1.316-1.334, 2.323-2.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.86. With shallower trench uptilt it—'twill suffice; 1.87. There, lest weeds choke the crop's luxuriance, here 1.88. Lest the scant moisture fail the barren sand. 1.89. Then thou shalt suffer in alternate year 1.90. The new-reaped fields to rest, and on the plain 1.91. A crust of sloth to harden; or, when star 1.92. Are changed in heaven, there sow the golden grain 1.93. Where erst, luxuriant with its quivering pod 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole;
18. Juvenal, Satires, 7.197-7.198 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. New Testament, Acts, 14.15, 17.26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.15. Men, why are you doing these things? We also are men of like passions with you, and bring you good news, that you should turn from these vain things to the living God, who made the sky and the earth and the sea, and all that is in them; 17.26. He made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the surface of the earth, having determined appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation
20. New Testament, Luke, 10.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.21. In that same hour Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit, and said, "I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for so it was well-pleasing in your sight.
21. New Testament, Matthew, 11.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.25. At that time, Jesus answered, "I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to infants.
22. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.2-33.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 17.4-17.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 1.3-1.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Origen, Against Celsus, 6.52, 8.21 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.52. Celsus proceeds as follows: With regard to the origin of the world and its destruction, whether it is to be regarded as uncreated and indestructible, or as created indeed, but not destructible, or the reverse, I at present say nothing. For this reason we too say nothing on these points, as the work in hand does not require it. Nor do we allege that the Spirit of the universal God mingled itself in things here below as in things alien to itself, as might appear from the expression, The Spirit of God moved upon the water; nor do we assert that certain wicked devices directed against His Spirit, as if by a different creator from the great God, and which were tolerated by the Supreme Divinity, needed to be completely frustrated. And, accordingly, I have nothing further to say to those who utter such absurdities; nor to Celsus, who does not refute them with ability. For he ought either not to have mentioned such matters at all, or else, in keeping with that character for philanthropy which he assumes, have carefully set them forth, and then endeavoured to rebut these impious assertions. Nor have we ever heard that the great God, after giving his spirit to the creator, demands it back again. Proceeding next foolishly to assail these impious assertions, he asks: What god gives anything with the intention of demanding it back? For it is the mark of a needy person to demand back (what he has given), whereas God stands in need of nothing. To this he adds, as if saying something clever against certain parties: Why, when he lent (his spirit), was he ignorant that he was lending it to an evil being? He asks, further: Why does he pass without notice a wicked creator who was counter-working his purposes? 8.21. Let us see what Celsus further says of God, and how he urges us to the use of those things which are properly called idol offerings, or, still better, offerings to demons, although, in his ignorance of what true sanctity is, and what sacrifices are well-pleasing to God, he call them holy sacrifices. His words are, God is the God of all alike; He is good, He stands in need of nothing, and He is without jealousy. What, then, is there to hinder those who are most devoted to His service from taking part in public feasts. I cannot see the connection which he fancies between God's being good, and independent, and free from jealousy, and His devoted servants taking part in public feasts. I confess, indeed, that from the fact that God is good, and without want of anything, and free from jealousy, it would follow as a consequence that we might take part in public feasts, if it were proved that the public feasts had nothing wrong in them, and were grounded upon true views of the character of God, so that they resulted naturally from a devout service of God. If, however, the so-called public festivals can in no way be shown to accord with the service of God, but may on the contrary be proved to have been devised by men when occasion offered to commemorate some human events, or to set forth certain qualities of water or earth, or the fruits of the earth - in that case, it is clear that those who wish to offer an enlightened worship to the Divine Being will act according to sound reason, and not take part in the public feasts. For to keep a feast, as one of the wise men of Greece has well said, is nothing else than to do one's duty; and that man truly celebrates a feast who does his duty and prays always, offering up continually bloodless sacrifices in prayer to God. That therefore seems to me a most noble saying of Paul, You observe days, and months, and times, and years. I am afraid of you, lest I have bestowed upon you labour in vain.
26. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 211

211. The king signified his agreement and said to another 'What is the essence of kingship?' And he replied, 'To rule oneself well and not to be led astray by wealth or fame to immoderate or unseemly desires, this is the true way of ruling if you reason the matter well out. For all that you really need is yours, and God is free from need and benigt withal. Let your thoughts be such as become a man, and desire not many things but only such as are necessary for ruling.'
27. Epicurus, Letters, 87-88, 86

28. Epicurus, Letters, 87-88, 86



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of the apostles Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117, 204
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
aetiology of labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 79
alexander the great, successors of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
animal Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
aristotle Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
atoms Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
causation, cause Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
christianity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
coronas, meteorological phenomenon Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
cosmic origin, first man Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
cosmic origin, single progenitor Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
cosmology Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
cosmos, pythagoras neologism Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
cosmos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
death Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
deucalion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 71, 117
earth Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211; Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
fire Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
flora Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
gems Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
god, needing nothing Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
god, self-sufficiency Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 71, 117
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 79, 117
hieros gamos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 117
historical epochs, cyclical Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 117
labor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60
literature, literary Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
locri, italian town Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, laws of nature in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211; Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
matter Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
moon Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 117
mythology in roman religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
nature, laws of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
nature, of human beings Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
nature, of things Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
nature Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
new testament Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
objectivism, objectivity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
paul, areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
pindar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
plants, poisonous Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
plants Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
plato Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 117
prayer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
pythagoras, pythagorean, neopythagoean Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
rainbows Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
religions, roman, mythology' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 218
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 117
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
seasons, cyclical change Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
self, concepts of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
snow Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
stoicism, stoics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
stoicism Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71, 117
subjectivity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
syracuse Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
tellus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
terra mater Faure, Conceptions of Time in Greek and Roman Antiquity (2022) 89
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
tranquillity, truth Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 211
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 204
universe, single cause Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 631
velinus lake Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71
vespasian (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 72
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 60, 79, 117
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 79
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 71