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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.614
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 299-301, 42, 298 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

298. Who keeps his oath shall benefit his kin.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 129 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

129. verum quaeso a vobis, iudices, ut haec pauca quae restant ita audiatis ut partim me dicere pro me ipso putetis, partim pro Sex. Roscio pro Sex. edd. VR : Sex. codd. . quae enim mihi ipsi ipsi om. ω indigna et intolerabilia videntur quaeque ad omnis, nisi providemus, arbitror pertinere, ea pro me ipso ex ex Naugerius (2): et codd. animi mei sensu ac dolore pronuntio; quae ad huius vitae casum causamque vitae casum causamque vitae discrimen casumque w : vitae causamque ω : vitae causam Ruhnken : vitam causamque Richter pertinent Eberhard : pertineant (-eat σφω ) codd. pertinent et quid hic pro se dici velit et qua condicione contentus sit iam in extrema oratione nostra, iudices, audietis.
4. Cicero, On The Haruspices, 28 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.128 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.128. Why should I speak of the amount of rational design displayed in animals to secure the perpetual preservation of their kind? To begin with some are male and some female, a device of nature to perpetuate the species. Then parts of their busy are most skilfully contrived to serve the purposes of procreation and of conception, and both male and female possess marvellous desires for copulation. And when the seed has settled in its place, it draws almost all the nutriment to itself and hedged within it fashions a living creature; when this has been dropped from the womb and has emerged, in the mammalian species almost all the nourishment received by the mother turns to milk, and the young just born, untaught and by nature's guidance, seek for the teats and satisfy their cravings with their bounty. And to show to us that none of these things merely happens by chance and that all are the work of nature's providence and skill, species that produce large litters of offspring, such as swine and dogs, have bestowed upon them a large number of teats, while those animals which bear only a few young have only a few teats.
6. Catullus, Poems, 63 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.19. 1.  Indeed, there is no tradition among the Romans either of Caelus being castrated by his own sons or of Saturn destroying his own offspring to secure himself from their attempts or of Jupiter dethroning Saturn and confining his own father in the dungeon of Tartarus, or, indeed, of wars, wounds, or bonds of the gods, or of their servitude among men.,2.  And no festival is observed among them as a day of mourning or by the wearing of black garments and the beating of breasts and the lamentations of women because of the disappearance of deities, such as the Greeks perform in commemorating the rape of Persephonê and the adventures of Dionysus and all the other things of like nature. And one will see among them, even though their manners are now corrupted, no ecstatic transports, no Corybantic frenzies, no begging under the colour of religion, no bacchanals or secret mysteries, no all-night vigils of men and women together in the temples, nor any other mummery of this kind; but alike in all their words and actions with respect to the gods a reverence is shown such as is seen among neither Greeks nor barbarians.,3.  And, — the thing which I myself have marvelled at most, — notwithstanding the influx into Rome of innumerable nations which are under every necessity of worshipping their ancestral gods according to the customs of their respective countries, yet the city has never officially adopted any of those foreign practices, as has been the experience of many cities in the past; but, even though she has, in pursuance of oracles, introduced certain rites from abroad, she celebrates them in accordance with her own traditions, after banishing all fabulous clap-trap. The rites of the Idaean goddess are a case in point;,4.  for the praetors perform sacrifices and celebrated games in her honour every year according to the Roman customs, but the priest and priestess of the goddess are Phrygians, and it is they who carry her image in procession through the city, begging alms in her name according to their custom, and wearing figures upon their breasts and striking their timbrels while their followers play tunes upon their flutes in honour of the Mother of the Gods.,5.  But by a law and decree of the senate no native Roman walks in procession through the city arrayed in a parti-coloured robe, begging alms or escorted by flute-players, or worships the god with the Phrygian ceremonies. So cautious are they about admitting any foreign religious customs and so great is their aversion to all pompous display that is wanting in decorum.
8. Livy, History, 29.10.4-29.10.8, 29.11.8, 29.14.5-29.14.14, 39.8-39.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.40, 1.117-1.119, 1.181, 1.250-1.264, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.923, 1.926-1.950, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.168, 2.172, 2.176, 2.581-2.613, 2.615-2.660, 2.662, 2.680, 2.688-2.699, 2.993, 2.1001, 2.1039, 3.18-3.22, 3.371, 5.111-5.112, 5.195-5.234, 5.392-5.415, 5.490-5.491, 5.622, 5.795-5.796, 5.809, 5.813-5.815, 5.911-5.912, 5.1204, 5.1252-5.1257, 6.76, 6.286, 6.388, 6.644, 6.670, 6.1228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Ovid, Fasti, 4.179-4.190, 4.193-4.244, 4.247-4.348, 4.363-4.365 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.179. Let the sky turn three times on its axis 4.180. Let the Sun three times yoke and loose his horses 4.181. And the Berecyntian flute will begin sounding 4.182. Its curved horn, it will be the Idaean Mother’s feast. 4.183. Eunuchs will march, and sound the hollow drums 4.184. And cymbal will clash with cymbal, in ringing tones: 4.185. Seated on the soft necks of her servants, she’ll be carried 4.186. With howling, through the midst of the City streets. 4.187. The stage is set: the games are calling. Watch, then 4.188. Quirites, and let those legal wars in the fora cease. 4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.190. By shrill clash of bronze, and curved flute’s dreadful drone. 4.193. ‘Nurslings of Helicon, mindful of her orders, reveal 4.194. Why the Great Goddess delights in continual din.’ 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love): 4.197. ‘Saturn was granted this prophecy: “Noblest of kings 4.198. You’ll be ousted by your own son’s sceptre.” 4.199. The god, fearful, devoured his children as soon a 4.200. Born, and then retained them deep in his guts. 4.201. often Rhea (Cybele) complained, at being so often pregt 4.202. Yet never a mother, and grieved at her own fruitfulness. 4.203. Then Jupiter was born (ancient testimony is credited 4.204. By most: so please don’t disturb the accepted belief): 4.205. A stone, concealed in clothing, went down Saturn’s throat 4.206. So the great progenitor was deceived by the fates. 4.207. Now steep Ida echoed to a jingling music 4.208. So the child might cry from its infant mouth, in safety. 4.209. Some beat shields with sticks, others empty helmets: 4.210. That was the Curetes’ and the Corybantes’ task. 4.211. The thing was hidden, and the ancient deed’s still acted out: 4.212. The goddess’s servants strike the bronze and sounding skins. 4.213. They beat cymbals for helmets, drums instead of shields: 4.214. The flute plays, as long ago, in the Phrygian mode.’ 4.215. The goddess ceased. I began: ‘Why do fierce lion 4.216. Yield untamed necks to the curving yoke for her?’ 4.217. I ceased. The goddess began: ‘It’s thought their ferocity 4.218. Was first tamed by her: the testament to it’s her chariot.’ 4.219. ‘But why is her head weighed down by a turreted crown? 4.220. Is it because she granted towers to the first cities?’ 4.221. She nodded. I said ‘Where did this urge to cut off 4.222. Their members come from?’ As I ended, the Muse spoke: 4.223. ‘In the woods, a Phrygian boy, Attis, of handsome face 4.224. Won the tower-bearing goddess with his chaste passion. 4.225. She desired him to serve her, and protect her temple 4.226. And said: “Wish, you might be a boy for ever.” 4.227. He promised to be true, and said: “If I’m lying 4.228. May the love I fail in be my last love.” 4.229. He did fail, and in meeting the nymph Sagaritis 4.230. Abandoned what he was: the goddess, angered, avenged it. 4.231. She destroyed the Naiad, by wounding a tree 4.232. Since the tree contained the Naiad’s fate. 4.233. Attis was maddened, and thinking his chamber’s roof 4.234. Was falling, fled for the summit of Mount Dindymus. 4.235. Now he cried: “Remove the torches”, now he cried: 4.236. “Take the whips away”: often swearing he saw the Furies. 4.237. He tore at his body too with a sharp stone 4.238. And dragged his long hair in the filthy dust 4.239. Shouting: “I deserved this! I pay the due penalty 4.240. In blood! Ah! Let the parts that harmed me, perish! 4.241. Let them perish!” cutting away the burden of his groin 4.242. And suddenly bereft of every mark of manhood. 4.243. His madness set a precedent, and his unmanly servant 4.244. Toss their hair, and cut off their members as if worthless.’ 4.247. ‘Guide of my work, I beg you, teach me also, where She 4.248. Was brought from. Was she always resident in our City? 4.249. ‘The Mother Goddess always loved Dindymus, Cybele 4.250. And Ida, with its pleasant streams, and the Trojan realm: 4.251. And when Aeneas brought Troy to Italian fields, the godde 4.252. Almost followed those ships that carried the sacred relics. 4.253. But she felt that fate didn’t require her powers in Latium 4.254. So she stayed behind in her long-accustomed place. 4.255. Later, when Rome was more than five centuries old 4.256. And had lifted its head above the conquered world 4.257. The priest consulted the fateful words of Euboean prophecy: 4.258. They say that what he found there was as follows: 4.259. ‘The Mother’s absent: Roman, I command you: seek the Mother. 4.260. When she arrives, she must be received in chaste hands.’ 4.261. The dark oracle’s ambiguity set the senators puzzling 4.262. As to who that parent might be, and where to seek her. 4.263. Apollo was consulted, and replied: ‘Fetch the Mother 4.264. of all the Gods, who you’ll find there on Mount Ida.’ 4.265. Noblemen were sent. Attalus at that time held 4.266. The Phrygian sceptre: he refused the Italian lords. 4.267. Marvellous to tell, the earth shook with long murmurs 4.268. And the goddess, from her shrine, spoke as follows: 4.269. ‘I myself wished them to seek me: don’t delay: send me 4.270. Willingly. Rome is a worthy place for all divinities.’ 4.271. Quaking with fear at her words, Attalus, said: ‘Go 4.272. You’ll still be ours: Rome claims Phrygian ancestry.’ 4.273. Immediately countless axes felled the pine-tree 4.274. Those trees pious Aeneas employed for his flight: 4.275. A thousand hands work, and the heavenly Mother 4.276. Soon has a hollow ship, painted in fiery colours. 4.277. She’s carried in perfect safety over her son’s waves 4.278. And reaches the long strait named for Phrixus’ sister 4.279. Passes fierce Rhoetum and the Sigean shore 4.280. And Tenedos and Eetion’s ancient kingdom. 4.281. Leaving Lesbos behind she then steered for the Cyclades 4.282. And the waves that break on Euboea’s Carystian shoals. 4.283. She passed the Icarian Sea, as well, where Icarus shed 4.284. His melting wings, giving his name to a vast tract of water. 4.285. Then leaving Crete to larboard, and the Pelopian wave 4.286. To starboard, she headed for Cythera, sacred to Venus. 4.287. From there to the Sicilian Sea, where Brontes, Sterope 4.288. And Aemonides forge their red-hot iron 4.289. Then, skirting African waters, she saw the Sardinian 4.290. Realm behind to larboard, and reached our Italy. 4.291. She’d arrived at the mouth (ostia) where the Tiber divide 4.292. To meet the deep, and flows with a wider sweep: 4.293. All the Knights, grave Senators, and commoners 4.294. Came to meet her at the mouth of the Tuscan river. 4.295. With them walked mothers, daughters, and brides 4.296. And all those virgins who tend the sacred fires. 4.297. The men wearied their arms hauling hard on the ropes: 4.298. The foreign vessel barely made way against the stream. 4.299. For a long time there’d been a drought: the grass was dry 4.300. And scorched: the boat stuck fast in the muddy shallows. 4.301. Every man, hauling, laboured beyond his strength 4.302. And encouraged their toiling hands with his cries. 4.303. Yet the ship lodged there, like an island fixed in mid-ocean: 4.304. And astonished at the portent, men stood and quaked. 4.305. Claudia Quinta traced her descent from noble Clausus 4.306. And her beauty was in no way unequal to her nobility: 4.307. She was chaste, but not believed so: hostile rumour 4.308. Had wounded her, false charges were levelled at her: 4.309. Her elegance, promenading around in various hairstyles 4.310. And her ready tongue, with stiff old men, counted against her. 4.311. Conscious of virtue, she laughed at the rumoured lies 4.312. But we’re always ready to credit others with faults. 4.313. Now, when she’d stepped from the line of chaste women 4.314. Taking pure river water in her hands, she wetted her head 4.315. Three times, three times lifted her palms to the sky 4.316. (Everyone watching her thought she’d lost her mind) 4.317. Then, kneeling, fixed her eyes on the goddess’s statue 4.318. And, with loosened hair, uttered these words: 4.319. “ Kind and fruitful Mother of the Gods, accept 4.320. A suppliant’s prayers, on this one condition: 4.321. They deny I’m chaste: let me be guilty if you condemn me: 4.322. Convicted by a goddess I’ll pay for it with my life. 4.323. But if I’m free of guilt, grant a pledge of my innocence 4.324. By your action: and, chaste, give way to my chaste hands.” 4.325. She spoke: then gave a slight pull at the rope 4.326. (A wonder, but the sacred drama attests what I say): 4.327. The goddess stirred, followed, and, following, approved her: 4.328. Witness the sound of jubilation carried to the stars. 4.329. They came to a bend in the river (called of old 4.330. The Halls of Tiber): there the stream turns left, ascending. 4.331. Night fell: they tied the rope to an oak stump 4.332. And, having eaten, settled to a tranquil sleep. 4.333. Dawn rose: they loosed the rope from the oak stump 4.334. After first laying a fire and offering incense 4.335. And crowned the stern, and sacrificed a heifer 4.336. Free of blemish, that had never known yoke or bull. 4.337. There’s a place where smooth-flowing Almo joins the Tiber 4.338. And the lesser flow loses its name in the greater: 4.339. There, a white-headed priest in purple robe 4.340. Washed the Lady, and sacred relics, in Almo’s water. 4.341. The attendants howled, and the mad flutes blew 4.342. And soft hands beat at the bull’s-hide drums. 4.343. Claudia walked in front with a joyful face 4.344. Her chastity proven by the goddess’s testimony: 4.345. The goddess herself, sitting in a cart, entered the Capene Gate: 4.346. Fresh flowers were scattered over the yoked oxen. 4.347. Nasica received her. The name of her temple’s founder is lost: 4.348. Augustus has re-dedicated it, and, before him, Metellus.’ 4.363. ‘Between green Cybele and high Celaenae,’ she said 4.364. ‘Runs a river of maddening water, called the Gallus. 4.365. Whoever drinks of it, is crazed: keep far away, all you
11. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.28-4.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Vergil, Georgics, 2.136-2.176, 2.333-2.334, 2.336-2.342, 2.406 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.406. Or on the eve of autumn's earliest frost
13. Juvenal, Satires, 6.512-6.516 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 8.24.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Lucian, Asinus, 36 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Julian (Emperor), , None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

17. Julian (Emperor), , None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

18. Sallustius, On The Gods, 4 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19. Epigraphy, Ils, 18



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 257, 285
agriculture Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), (stoic) of aphrodite / venus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 40
allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
almo Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 285
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
animals, distinctions between Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
animals, donkey Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
animals, origin and growth of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
aphrodite Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 40
arbor intrat (festival) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 167, 285
arcesilaus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
archives Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
asia minor Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
atargatis, semiviri/mares Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
attis, in rome Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
attis, pedum Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
attis, phryx puer Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
attis, priest Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
attis Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
augustus (fi rst emperor) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 285
balbus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
caecilius Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
catullus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
cicero Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
cista Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
cybele Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217; Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
cymbals Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
dea syria (atargatis) Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
dionysus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
dover, kenneth j. Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
earth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32, 161
effeminacy Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicureans, allegedly effeminate Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
epicureans, as eunuchs Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
epicureans, clothing of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
epicurus, appearance of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
epicurus, clothing of Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
excrement Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 242
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
galli Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 242
gallos / gallus / galloi / galli Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
gallus, galli, archigallus Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
hannibal Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
hippocrates Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
hymn (philosophical) Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 40
hyperbole Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216, 217
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
infancy/children Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
julian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
kybebe/le Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
laberius galli Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216, 217, 250
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
magna mater Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32, 161; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
mater magna, mater deum, cybele Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
mater magna Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 167, 257, 285; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
menologium colotianum Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 285
metroön, at athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217, 250
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
mother of the gods, myths of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
mother of the gods, scholarship on Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
mysteries Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
novel, ancient Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 167
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
ostia Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
palatine hill Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 172
parker, robert Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 58
performance Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32, 161
pessinous Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
phaethon Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 40
philodemus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
phrygian cap/garb Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
pine-tree Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 167
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
purity Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 257
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
saturn Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
self-castration Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 199
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
seneca (the younger) Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 161
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
sexuality, perverse / deviant Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
taurobolium Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 257
teleology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
templum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 216
valerius messalla niger' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 291
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 40; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 161
voice / mannerisms of speech Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 202
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217
zeus; zeus-helios Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 257
zeus Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 257; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 32
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 217