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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.33
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.321-6.322, 7.81, 7.84-7.97 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Laws, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.95-5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.95. Totumque fr. 439 hoc de voluptate sic ille praecipit, ut voluptatem ipsam per se, quia voluptas sit, semper optandam et et add. s cf. p. 423, 4 de orat. 1, 231 al. (asyndeton ipsum tolerari potest cf. exsibilatur exploditur parad. 26) expetendam putet, eademque ratione dolorem ob id ipsum, quia dolor sit, semper esse fugiendum; itaque hac usurum compensatione conpensatione K sapientem, ut et ut et s ut om. X et om. voluptatem fugiat, si ea eam maiorem dolorem effectura sit, et dolorem suscipiat maiorem efficientem voluptatem; omniaque iucunda, iocunda GR 1 ( ss. 1 ) quamquam sensu corporis iudicentur, ad animum referri tamen. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
4. Catullus, Poems, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.39, 1.54-1.61, 1.75-1.79, 1.127-1.145, 1.584-1.586, 1.928, 1.947, 2.1-2.32, 2.34-2.66, 2.398-2.399, 2.504, 3.1-3.2, 3.11-3.13, 3.22, 3.31-3.93, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.967-4.968, 4.1133-4.1134, 5.10-5.12, 5.48, 5.54-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.373-5.375, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1105-5.1135, 5.1226-5.1232, 5.1392-5.1397, 6.1-6.80, 6.86, 6.90-6.95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.637, 4.193, 6.605 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.637. now told upon men's lips the whole world round. 4.193. and fiercely champs the foam-flecked bridle-rein. 6.605. Would soothe her angry soul. But on the ground
7. Vergil, Georgics, 4.8-4.50, 4.125-4.146, 4.205, 4.210-4.214, 4.228-4.280 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.8. Slight though the poet's theme, not slight the praise 4.9. So frown not heaven, and Phoebus hear his call. 4.10. First find your bees a settled sure abode 4.11. Where neither winds can enter (winds blow back 4.12. The foragers with food returning home) 4.13. Nor sheep and butting kids tread down the flowers 4.14. Nor heifer wandering wide upon the plain 4.15. Dash off the dew, and bruise the springing blades. 4.16. Let the gay lizard too keep far aloof 4.17. His scale-clad body from their honied stalls 4.18. And the bee-eater, and what birds beside 4.19. And Procne smirched with blood upon the breast 4.20. From her own murderous hands. For these roam wide 4.21. Wasting all substance, or the bees themselve 4.22. Strike flying, and in their beaks bear home, to glut 4.23. Those savage nestlings with the dainty prey. 4.24. But let clear springs and moss-green pools be near 4.25. And through the grass a streamlet hurrying run 4.26. Some palm-tree o'er the porch extend its shade 4.27. Or huge-grown oleaster, that in Spring 4.28. Their own sweet Spring-tide, when the new-made chief 4.29. Lead forth the young swarms, and, escaped their comb 4.30. The colony comes forth to sport and play 4.31. The neighbouring bank may lure them from the heat 4.32. Or bough befriend with hospitable shade. 4.33. O'er the mid-waters, whether swift or still 4.34. Cast willow-branches and big stones enow 4.35. Bridge after bridge, where they may footing find 4.36. And spread their wide wings to the summer sun 4.37. If haply Eurus, swooping as they pause 4.38. Have dashed with spray or plunged them in the deep. 4.39. And let green cassias and far-scented thymes 4.40. And savory with its heavy-laden breath 4.41. Bloom round about, and violet-beds hard by 4.42. Sip sweetness from the fertilizing springs. 4.43. For the hive's self, or stitched of hollow bark 4.44. Or from tough osier woven, let the door 4.45. Be strait of entrance; for stiff winter's cold 4.46. Congeals the honey, and heat resolves and thaws 4.47. To bees alike disastrous; not for naught 4.48. So haste they to cement the tiny pore 4.49. That pierce their walls, and fill the crevice 4.50. With pollen from the flowers, and glean and keep 4.125. Symmetric: this the likelier breed; from these 4.126. When heaven brings round the season, thou shalt strain 4.127. Sweet honey, nor yet so sweet as passing clear 4.128. And mellowing on the tongue the wine-god's fire. 4.129. But when the swarms fly aimlessly abroad 4.130. Disport themselves in heaven and spurn their cells 4.131. Leaving the hive unwarmed, from such vain play 4.132. Must you refrain their volatile desires 4.133. Nor hard the task: tear off the monarchs' wings; 4.134. While these prove loiterers, none beside will dare 4.135. Mount heaven, or pluck the standards from the camp. 4.136. Let gardens with the breath of saffron flower 4.137. Allure them, and the lord of placeName key= 4.138. Priapus, wielder of the willow-scythe 4.139. Safe in his keeping hold from birds and thieves. 4.140. And let the man to whom such cares are dear 4.141. Himself bring thyme and pine-trees from the heights 4.142. And strew them in broad belts about their home; 4.143. No hand but his the blistering task should ply 4.144. Plant the young slips, or shed the genial showers. 4.145. And I myself, were I not even now 4.146. Furling my sails, and, nigh the journey's end 4.205. By settled order ply their tasks afield; 4.210. Others the while lead forth the full-grown young 4.211. Their country's hope, and others press and pack 4.212. The thrice repured honey, and stretch their cell 4.213. To bursting with the clear-strained nectar sweet. 4.214. Some, too, the wardship of the gates befalls 4.228. Not otherwise, to measure small with great 4.229. The love of getting planted in their breast 4.230. Goads on the bees, that haunt old Cecrops' heights 4.231. Each in his sphere to labour. The old have charge 4.232. To keep the town, and build the walled combs 4.233. And mould the cunning chambers; but the youth 4.234. Their tired legs packed with thyme, come labouring home 4.235. Belated, for afar they range to feed 4.236. On arbutes and the grey-green willow-leaves 4.237. And cassia and the crocus blushing red 4.238. Glue-yielding limes, and hyacinths dusky-eyed. 4.239. One hour for rest have all, and one for toil: 4.240. With dawn they hurry from the gates—no room 4.241. For loiterers there: and once again, when even 4.242. Now bids them quit their pasturing on the plain 4.243. Then homeward make they, then refresh their strength: 4.244. A hum arises: hark! they buzz and buzz 4.245. About the doors and threshold; till at length 4.246. Safe laid to rest they hush them for the night 4.247. And welcome slumber laps their weary limbs. 4.248. But from the homestead not too far they fare 4.249. When showers hang like to fall, nor, east winds nigh 4.250. Confide in heaven, but 'neath the city wall 4.251. Safe-circling fetch them water, or essay 4.252. Brief out-goings, and oft weigh-up tiny stones 4.253. As light craft ballast in the tossing tide 4.254. Wherewith they poise them through the cloudy vast. 4.255. This law of life, too, by the bees obeyed 4.256. Will move thy wonder, that nor sex with sex 4.257. Yoke they in marriage, nor yield their limbs to love 4.258. Nor know the pangs of labour, but alone 4.259. From leaves and honied herbs, the mothers, each 4.260. Gather their offspring in their mouths, alone 4.261. Supply new kings and pigmy commonwealth 4.262. And their old court and waxen realm repair. 4.263. oft, too, while wandering, against jagged stone 4.264. Their wings they fray, and 'neath the burden yield 4.265. Their liberal lives: so deep their love of flowers 4.266. So glorious deem they honey's proud acquist. 4.267. Therefore, though each a life of narrow span 4.268. Ne'er stretched to summers more than seven, befalls 4.269. Yet deathless doth the race endure, and still 4.270. Perennial stands the fortune of their line 4.271. From grandsire unto grandsire backward told. 4.272. Moreover, not placeName key= 4.273. of boundless placeName key= 4.274. Nor Median Hydaspes, to their king 4.275. Do such obeisance: lives the king unscathed 4.276. One will inspires the million: is he dead 4.277. Snapt is the bond of fealty; they themselve 4.278. Ravage their toil-wrought honey, and rend amain 4.279. Their own comb's waxen trellis. He is the lord 4.280. of all their labour; him with awful eye
8. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90.8, 90.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 131, 130

10. Epicurus, Vatican Sayings, 33, 25



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcinous Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 52
architecture Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
arete Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 52
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
bible, responses to Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
carthage, carthaginian Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
catullus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
cicero Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
corycian gardener Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
death Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
decline Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
desire Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicurean garden Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicureanism, ethics of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
epicureans, and food Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51, 52
epicureans, epicureanism Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicurus/epicureanism, hedonic calculus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
friendship, epicurean Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 52
frugality Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179; Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
gardens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
goal of life Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
greediness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
happiness Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179; Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
homer Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51, 52
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51, 52; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
magnificence Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
odysseus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51, 52
ovid, and epicurus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ovid, hedonic calculus in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
pain Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51
phaeacians Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51, 52
philodemus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
pleasure Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
pride Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 182
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
religion Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
seneca (the younger) Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 51
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
social philosophy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
superbia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 57
tarentum Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
telos Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 52
tsouna, voula Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
virgil Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 52
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
wealth' Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179