Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.263-2.265
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.144-2.148, 20.226-20.229, 23.369 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.144. /let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main 2.145. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.146. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.147. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.148. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 20.226. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.227. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.228. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.229. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 23.369. /away from the ships and beneath their breasts the dust arose and stood, as it were a cloud or a whirlwind, and their manes streamed on the blasts of the wind. And the chariots would now course over the bounteous earth, and now again would bound on high; and they that drave
2. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Aristotle, Soul, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Aristotle, Interpretation, 9 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Aristotle, Movement of Animals, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, 3.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Topics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1259-3.1261 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1259. ὡς δʼ ὅτʼ ἀρήιος ἵππος ἐελδόμενος πολέμοιο 3.1260. σκαρθμῷ ἐπιχρεμέθων κρούει πέδον, αὐτὰρ ὕπερθεν 3.1261. κυδιόων ὀρθοῖσιν ἐπʼ οὔασιν αὐχένʼ ἀείρει·
10. Cicero, Academica, 2.104, 2.108 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Cicero, On Fate, 9.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Cicero, On Laws, 2.19-2.22, 2.25-2.69 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.15, 2.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.15. And the fourth and most potent cause of the belief he said was the uniform motion and revolution of the heavens, and the varied groupings and ordered beauty of the sun, moon and stars, the very sight of which was in itself enough to prove that these things are not the mere effect of chance. When a man goes into a house, a wrestling-school or a public assembly and observes in all that goes on arrangement, regularity and system, he cannot possibly suppose that these things come about without a cause: he realizes that there is someone who presides and controls. Far more therefore with the vast movements and phases of the heavenly bodies, and these ordered processes of a multitude of enormous masses of matter, which throughout the countless ages of the infinite past have never in the smallest degree played false, is he compelled to infer that these mighty world-motions are regulated by some Mind. 2.43. moreover the substance employed as food is also believed to have some influence on mental acuteness; it is therefore likely that the stars possess surpassing intelligence, since they inhabit the ethereal region of the world and also are nourished by the moist vapours of sea and earth, rarefied in their passage through the wide intervening space. Again, the consciousness and intelligence of the stars is most clearly evinced by their order and regularity; for regular and rhythmical motion is impossible without design, which contains no trace of casual or accidental variation; now the order and eternal regularity of the constellations indicates neither a process of nature, for it is highly rational, nor chance, for chance loves variation and abhors regularity; it follows therefore that the stars move of their own free-will and because of their intelligence and divinity.
14. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.49, 1.76-1.77, 1.107, 1.136-1.634, 1.988-1.1082, 2.184-2.262, 2.264-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.568, 2.700-2.729, 2.1058-2.1063, 2.1116-2.1117, 3.60, 3.94-3.135, 3.296-3.307, 3.1078, 4.75-4.83, 4.400-4.403, 4.426-4.431, 4.436-4.442, 4.547-4.548, 4.638-4.641, 4.678-4.683, 4.714-4.721, 4.818-4.821, 4.877-4.891, 4.962-4.1036, 4.1058-4.1287, 5.82, 5.88-5.90, 5.388, 5.416-5.508, 5.665, 5.677-5.679, 5.731-5.750, 5.772-5.1457, 6.1, 6.25, 6.58-6.66, 6.405, 6.624, 6.777-6.778, 6.786-6.787, 6.821-6.823, 6.1142-6.1143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Ovid, Tristia, 2.41, 2.123-2.138, 5.8.25, 5.9.25-5.9.30, 5.9.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.63, 3.1-3.48, 3.66-3.68, 3.89-3.100, 3.102, 3.116, 3.158, 3.196, 3.509-3.514, 4.561-4.562 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.66. Be his prime care a shapely dam to choose. 3.67. of kine grim-faced is goodliest, with coarse head 3.68. And burly neck, whose hanging dewlaps reach 3.89. Renew them still; with yearly choice of young 3.90. Preventing losses, lest too late thou rue. 3.91. Nor steeds crave less selection; but on those 3.92. Thou think'st to rear, the promise of their line 3.93. From earliest youth thy chiefest pains bestow. 3.94. See from the first yon high-bred colt afield 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.102. And sorrel. Then lo! if arms are clashed afar 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.158. The herd itself of purpose they reduce 3.196. And which to rear for breeding, or devote 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing
17. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.12.34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. New Testament, Luke, 22.42 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22.42. saying, "Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done.
19. New Testament, Mark, 14.36 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.36. He said, "Abba, Father, all things are possible to you. Please remove this cup from me. However, not what I desire, but what you desire.
20. New Testament, Matthew, 26.39 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26.39. He went forward a little, fell on his face, and prayed, saying, "My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass away from me; nevertheless, not what I desire, but what you desire.
21. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.3.4, 1.3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Galen, On Temperaments, 2.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.111 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

24. Origen, On First Principles, 3.1.8, 3.1.18, 3.1.20 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.1.8. Let us begin, then, with those words which were spoken to Pharaoh, who is said to have been hardened by God, in order that he might not let the people go; and, along with his case, the language of the apostle also will be considered, where he says, Therefore He has mercy on whom He will, and whom He will He hardens. For it is on these passages chiefly that the heretics rely, asserting that salvation is not in our own power, but that souls are of such a nature as must by all means be either lost or saved; and that in no way can a soul which is of an evil nature become good, or one which is of a virtuous nature be made bad. And hence they maintain that Pharaoh, too, being of a ruined nature, was on that account hardened by God, who hardens those that are of an earthly nature, but has compassion on those who are of a spiritual nature. Let us see, then, what is the meaning of their assertion; and let us, in the first place, request them to tell us whether they maintain that the soul of Pharaoh was of an earthly nature, such as they term lost. They will undoubtedly answer that it was of an earthly nature. If so, then to believe God, or to obey Him, when his nature opposed his so doing, was an impossibility. And if this were his condition by nature, what further need was there for his heart to be hardened, and this not once, but several times, unless indeed because it was possible for him to yield to persuasion? Nor could any one be said to be hardened by another, save him who of himself was not obdurate. And if he were not obdurate of himself, it follows that neither was he of an earthly nature, but such an one as might give way when overpowered by signs and wonders. But he was necessary for God's purpose, in order that, for the saving of the multitude, He might manifest in him His power by his offering resistance to numerous miracles, and struggling against the will of God, and his heart being by this means said to be hardened. Such are our answers, in the first place, to these persons; and by these their assertion may be overturned, according to which they think that Pharaoh was destroyed in consequence of his evil nature. And with regard to the language of the Apostle Paul, we must answer them in a similar way. For who are they whom God hardens, according to your view? Those, namely, whom you term of a ruined nature, and who, I am to suppose, would have done something else had they not been hardened. If, indeed, they come to destruction in consequence of being hardened, they no longer perish naturally, but in virtue of what befalls them. Then, in the next place, upon whom does God show mercy? On those, namely, who are to be saved. And in what respect do those persons stand in need of a second compassion, who are to be saved once by their nature, and so come naturally to blessedness, except that it is shown even from their case, that, because it was possible for them to perish, they therefore obtain mercy, that so they may not perish, but come to salvation, and possess the kingdom of the good. And let this be our answer to those who devise and invent the fable of good or bad natures, i.e., of earthly or spiritual souls, in consequence of which, as they say, each one is either saved or lost. 3.1.8. Let us begin, then, with what is said about Pharaoh— that he was hardened by God, that he might not send away the people; along with which will be examined also the statement of the apostle, Therefore has He mercy on whom He will have mercy, and whom He will He hardens. And certain of those who hold different opinions misuse these passages, themselves also almost destroying free-will by introducing ruined natures incapable of salvation, and others saved which it is impossible can be lost; and Pharaoh, they say, as being of a ruined nature, is therefore hardened by God, who has mercy upon the spiritual, but hardens the earthly. Let us see now what they mean. For we shall ask them if Pharaoh was of an earthy nature; and when they answer, we shall say that he who is of an earthy nature is altogether disobedient to God: but if disobedient, what need is there of his heart being hardened, and that not once, but frequently? Unless perhaps, since it was possible for him to obey (in which case he would certainly have obeyed, as not being earthy, when hard pressed by the signs and wonders), God needs him to be disobedient to a greater degree, in order that He may manifest His mighty deeds for the salvation of the multitude, and therefore hardens his heart. This will be our answer to them in the first place, in order to overturn their supposition that Pharaoh was of a ruined nature. And the same reply must be given to them with respect to the statement of the apostle. For whom does God harden? Those who perish, as if they would obey unless they were hardened, or manifestly those who would be saved because they are not of a ruined nature. And on whom has He mercy? Is it on those who are to be saved? And how is there need of a second mercy for those who have been prepared once for salvation, and who will by all means become blessed on account of their nature? Unless perhaps, since they are capable of incurring destruction, if they did not receive mercy, they will obtain mercy, in order that they may not incur that destruction of which they are capable, but may be in the condition of those who are saved. And this is our answer to such persons. 3.1.18. Let us now look to the expression, It is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. For our opponents assert, that if it does not depend upon him that wills, nor on him that runs, but on God that shows mercy, that a man be saved, our salvation is not in our own power. For our nature is such as to admit of our either being saved or not, or else our salvation rests solely on the will of Him who, if He wills it, shows mercy, and confers salvation. Now let us inquire, in the first place, of such persons, whether to desire blessings be a good or evil act; and whether to hasten after good as a final aim be worthy of praise. If they were to answer that such a procedure was deserving of censure, they would evidently be mad; for all holy men both desire blessings and run after them, and certainly are not blameworthy. How, then, is it that he who is not saved, if he be of an evil nature, desires blessing, and runs after them, but does not find them? For they say that a bad tree does not bring forth good fruits, whereas it is a good fruit to desire blessings. And how is the fruit of a bad tree good? And if they assert that to desire blessings, and to run after them, is an act of indifference, i.e., neither good nor bad, we shall reply, that if it be an indifferent act to desire blessings, and to run after them, then the opposite of that will also be an indifferent act, viz., to desire evils, and to run after them; whereas it is certain that it is not an indifferent act to desire evils, and to run after them, but one that is manifestly wicked. It is established, then, that to desire and follow after blessings is not an indifferent, but a virtuous proceeding. 3.1.18. Let us look next at the passage: So, then, it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. For they who find fault say: If it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy, salvation does not depend upon ourselves, but upon the arrangement made by Him who has formed us such as we are, or on the purpose of Him who shows mercy when he pleases. Now we must ask these persons the following questions: Whether to desire what is good is virtuous or vicious; and whether the desire to run in order to reach the goal in the pursuit of what is good be worthy of praise or censure? And if they shall say that it is worthy of censure, they will return an absurd answer; since the saints desire and run, and manifestly in so acting do nothing that is blameworthy. But if they shall say that it is virtuous to desire what is good, and to run after what is good, we shall ask them how a perishing nature desires better things; for it is like an evil tree producing good fruit, since it is a virtuous act to desire better things. They will give (perhaps) a third answer, that to desire and run after what is good is one of those things that are indifferent, and neither beautiful nor wicked. Now to this we must say, that if to desire and to run after what is good be a thing of indifference, then the opposite also is a thing of indifference, viz., to desire what is evil, and to run after it. But it is not a thing of indifference to desire what is evil, and to run after it. And therefore also, to desire what is good, and to run after it, is not a thing of indifference. Such, then, is the defense which I think we can offer to the statement, that it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. Solomon says in the book of Psalms (for the Song of Degrees is his, from which we shall quote the words): Unless the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it; except the Lord keep the city, the watchman wakes in vain: not dissuading us from building, nor teaching us not to keep watch in order to guard the city in our soul, but showing that what is built without God, and does not receive a guard from Him, is built in vain and watched to no purpose, because God might reasonably be entitled the Lord of the building; and the Governor of all things, the Ruler of the guard of the city. As, then, if we were to say that such a building is not the work of the builder, but of God, and that it was not owing to the successful effort of the watcher, but of the God who is over all, that such a city suffered no injury from its enemies, we should not be wrong, it being understood that something also had been done by human means, but the benefit being gratefully referred to God who brought it to pass; so, seeing that the (mere) human desire is not sufficient to attain the end, and that the running of those who are, as it were, athletes, does not enable them to gain the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus — for these things are accomplished with the assistance of God — it is well said that it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. As if also it were said with regard to husbandry what also is actually recorded: I planted, Apollos watered; and God gave the increase. So then neither is he that plants anything, neither he that waters; but God that gives the increase. Now we could not piously assert that the production of full crops was the work of the husbandman, or of him that watered, but the work of God. So also our own perfection is brought about, not as if we ourselves did nothing; for it is not completed by us, but God produces the greater part of it. And that this assertion may be more clearly believed, we shall take an illustration from the art of navigation. For in comparison with the effect of the winds, and the mildness of the air, and the light of the stars, all co-operating in the preservation of the crew, what proportion could the art of navigation be said to bear in the bringing of the ship into harbour? — since even the sailors themselves, from piety, do not venture to assert often that they had saved the ship, but refer all to God; not as if they had done nothing, but because what had been done by Providence was infinitely greater than what had been effected by their art. And in the matter of our salvation, what is done by God is infinitely greater than what is done by ourselves; and therefore, I think, is it said that it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy. For if in the manner which they imagine we must explain the statement, that it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but of God that shows mercy, the commandments are superfluous; and it is in vain that Paul himself blames some for having fallen away, and approves of others as having remained upright, and enacts laws for the Churches: it is in vain also that we give ourselves up to desire better things, and in vain also (to attempt) to run. But it is not in vain that Paul gives such advice, censuring some and approving of others; nor in vain that we give ourselves up to the desire of better things, and to the chase after things that are pre-eminent. They have accordingly not well explained the meaning of the passage. 3.1.20. Still the declaration of the apostle will appear to drag us to the conclusion that we are not possessed of freedom of will, in which, objecting against himself, he says, Therefore has He mercy on whom He will have mercy, and whom He will He hardens. You will say then unto me, Why does He yet find fault? For who has resisted His will? Nay but, O man, who are you that replies against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why have you made me thus? Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour? For it will be said: If the potter of the same lump make some vessels to honour and others to dishonour, and God thus form some men for salvation and others for ruin, then salvation or ruin does not depend upon ourselves, nor are we possessed of free-will. Now we must ask him who deals so with these passages, whether it is possible to conceive of the apostle as contradicting himself. I presume, however, that no one will venture to say so. If, then, the apostle does not utter contradictions, how can he, according to him who so understands him, reasonably find fault, censuring the individual at Corinth who had committed fornication, or those who had fallen away, and had not repented of the licentiousness and impurity of which they had been guilty? And how can he bless those whom he praises as having done well, as he does the house of Onesiphorus in these words: The Lord give mercy to the house of Onesiphorus; for he oft refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain: but, when he was in Rome, he sought me out very diligently, and found me. The Lord grant to him that he may find mercy of the Lord in that day. It is not consistent for the same apostle to blame the sinner as worthy of censure, and to praise him who had done well as deserving of approval; and again, on the other hand, to say, as if nothing depended on ourselves, that the cause was in the Creator why the one vessel was formed to honour, and the other to dishonour. And how is this statement correct: For we must all appear before the judgment-seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he has done, whether it be good or bad, since they who have done evil have advanced to this pitch of wickedness because they were created vessels unto dishonour, while they that have lived virtuously have done good because they were created from the beginning for this purpose, and became vessels unto honour? And again, how does not the statement made elsewhere conflict with the view which these persons draw from the words which we have quoted (that it is the fault of the Creator that one vessel is in honour and another in dishonour), viz., that in a great house there are not only vessels of gold and silver, but also of wood and of earth; and some to honour, and some to dishonour. If a man therefore purge himself, he shall be a vessel unto honour, sanctified, and meet for the Master's use, and prepared unto every good work; for if he who purges himself becomes a vessel unto honour, and he who allows himself to remain unpurged becomes a vessel unto dishonour, then, so far as these words are concerned, the Creator is not at all to blame. For the Creator makes vessels of honour and vessels of dishonour, not from the beginning according to His foreknowledge, since He does not condemn or justify beforehand according to it; but (He makes) those into vessels of honour who purged themselves, and those into vessels of dishonour who allowed themselves to remain unpurged: so that it results from older causes (which operated) in the formation of the vessels unto honour and dishonour, that one was created for the former condition, and another for the latter. But if we once admit that there were certain older causes (at work) in the forming of a vessel unto honour, and of one unto dishonour, what absurdity is there in going back to the subject of the soul, and (in supposing) that a more ancient cause for Jacob being loved and for Esau being hated existed with respect to Jacob before his assumption of a body, and with regard to Esau before he was conceived in the womb of Rebecca?
25. Plotinus, Enneads, 6.8 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Nemesius, On The Nature of Man, 35 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

27. Epicurus, On Nature, 34.26

28. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 134, 133

29. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 77



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
action, and character Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
action, voluntary Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
action Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231; Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
akrasia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 279, 280
amor, as destructive force Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
animals, motion of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91, 99, 262; Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
animus, in lucretiuss epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
anthropomorphism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
appetite (epithumia), distinguished boulēsis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
aristotle, and plants and animals Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 128
aristotle, on spontaneity and causation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 128
aristotle Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203
atomism, atomists Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
atomism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
atoms, and swerve Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128
atoms, and teleology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128
atoms, andoid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127
atoms, movement of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127
atoms, swerve Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
atoms, swerve of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
atoms Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
augustine Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
augustus, anger Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 279, 280
augustus, clemency Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 280
avernus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
belief Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
bobzien, susanne Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
body-environment approach (bea), in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
body (human), and knowledge acquisition/cognition Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
boulēsis Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
causation, cause Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cause (aitia, aition), and tools Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99, 262
chance Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
children Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 73
cicero Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cleanthes' appeal to indifference, free will" Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333
clinamen Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
cognition Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
contingency Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
creation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
de lacy, p. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
death, of democritus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127
democritus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
desire Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
determinism, and fatalism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
determinism, logical Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53
disposition Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
emergence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
emotion Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
epictetus, stoic Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 73; Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
epicurus, and action Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
epicurus, and bivalence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
epicurus, and emergence Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
epicurus, because of us (par' hēmas)" Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
epicurus, freedom from any master (adespoton) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
epicurus Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
eudoxus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
explanations, and the swerve Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
explanations, and volition Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
fate Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 126, 128; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53
free will Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 125, 126, 127, 128; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
freedom, and determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230, 231
freedom, and swerve of atoms Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333
freedom, and will Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333
freedom Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
galen Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
gauthier, r.-a Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
heuretai Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
horace, autobiographical details Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 73
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99, 262
imagery, chariots Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
indeterminacy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
kahn, charles Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
law Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 128
light evoked Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 73
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
lucretius, epicurean, free will Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333
lucretius, laws of nature in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 73; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
lucretius carus, t Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
madden, john d. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
mars, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
matter Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
maximus, confessor, christian Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
mind, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
mind Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
myths, numa pompilius Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
natural law Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
necessity Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53
neptune Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
oaths Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
origen, church father, does only god will? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
ovid, akrasia in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 279, 280
paul, st Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pietas Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
plants Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 127, 128
plato, republic Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
plato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
plotinus, neoplatonist Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
pontifices Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
porphyry, neoplatonist Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
posidonius Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
prayer Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
principle (archē), of motion Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
proairesis, epictetus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
prodigies Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
prohairesis Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
properties, macroscopic Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
rationality Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
reason, or reasoning Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
reproduction, epicurean theory of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
responsibility, and character Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
responsibility, and praise and blame Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
responsibility, and punishment Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
responsibility, moral Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
responsibility Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
sacrifices Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
salles, ricardo Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
sedley, david Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 230
seeds Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
senses, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
soul, the, stoic model of Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
sphragis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
stoicism, stoics, cosmology of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 159
stoicism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 203; Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
stoics Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
temple buildings' Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 54
tertullian, church father, free power of choice Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
thumos Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
treaties Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 95
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
up to us/in our power (eph' hēmin)" Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
up to us/in our power (eph' hēmin), par' hēmas" Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
up to us (to ephhēmin) Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 231
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 91
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
voluntas Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 99
will, boulēsis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
will, freedom Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333
will, let this cuppass from me Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320
will, proairesis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 333
will, the, free will Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
will, the Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 53, 56
will power Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 56
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 320, 333