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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.1039
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.96-2.97, 2.115 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.96. Thus far Aristotle; let us for our part imagine a darkness as dense as that which is said to have once covered the neighbouring districts on the occasion of an eruption of the volcano Etna, so that for two days no man could recognize his fellow, and when on the third day the sun shone upon them, they felt as if they had come to life again: well, suppose that after darkness had prevailed from the beginning of time, it similarly happened to ourselves suddenly to behold the light of day, what should we think of the splendour of the heavens? But daily recurrence and habit familiarize our indicates with the sight, and we feel no surprise or curiosity as to the reasons for things that we see always; just as if it were the novelty and not rather the importance of phenomena that ought to arouse us to inquire into their causes. 2.97. Who would not deny the name of human being to a man who, on seeing the regular motions of the heaven and the fixed order of the stars and the accurate interconnexion and interrelation of all things, can deny that these things possess any rational design, and can maintain that phenomena, the wisdom of whose ordering transcends the capacity of our wisdom to understand it, take place by chance? When we see something moved by machinery, like an orrery or clock or many other such things, we do not doubt that these contrivances are the work of reason; when therefore we behold the whole compass of the heaven moving with revolutions of marvellous velocity and executing with perfect regularity the annual changes of the seasons with absolute safety and security for all things, how can we doubt that all this is effected not merely by reason, but by a reason that is transcendent and divine? 2.115. Can any sane person believe that all this array of stars and this vast celestial adornment could have been created out of atoms rushing thenceforth fortuitously and at random? or could any other being devoid of intelligence and reason have created them? Not merely did their creation postulate intelligence, but it is impossible to understand their nature without intelligence of a high order. "but not only are these things marvellous, but nothing is more remarkable than the stability and coherence of the world, which is such that it is impossible even to imagine anything better adapted to endure. For all its parts in every direction gravitate with a uniform pressure towards the centre. Moreover busy conjoined maintain their union most permanently when they have some bond encompassing them to bind them together; and this function is fulfilled by that rational and intelligent substance which pervades the whole world as the efficient cause of all things and which draws and collects the outermost particles towards the centre.
3. Catullus, Poems, 68.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.102-1.135, 1.156-1.183, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.264, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 1.1102-1.1112, 1.1114-1.1117, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.569-2.580, 2.600-2.643, 2.645, 2.1001, 2.1030-2.1038, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.1-3.2, 3.18-3.22, 3.371, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 3.1090-3.1094, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.414-4.419, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 4.1286-4.1287, 5.97-5.109, 5.111-5.112, 5.235-5.508, 5.622, 5.783-5.1457, 6.1-6.6, 6.24-6.34, 6.76, 6.121-6.131, 6.186, 6.286, 6.388, 6.489, 6.608, 6.615, 6.644, 6.670, 6.910, 6.1012, 6.1056, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Eclogues, 2.45-2.55 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.45. ‘Mine once,’ quoth he, ‘now yours, as heir to own.’ 2.46. Foolish Amyntas heard and envied me. 2.47. Ay, and two fawns, I risked my neck to find 2.48. in a steep glen, with coats white-dappled still 2.49. from a sheep's udders suckled twice a day— 2.50. these still I keep for you; which Thestili 2.51. implores me oft to let her lead away; 2.52. and she shall have them, since my gifts you spurn. 2.53. Come hither, beauteous boy; for you the Nymph 2.54. bring baskets, see, with lilies brimmed; for you 2.55. plucking pale violets and poppy-heads
6. Vergil, Georgics, 2.109, 2.114, 2.136-2.176, 2.473-2.474, 2.532-2.538 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.109. To heaven upshot with teeming boughs, the tree 2.114. Fat olives, orchades, and radii 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
catullus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
cicero, allusion by lucretius to Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 70
cicero, de natura deorum Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 70
corydon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
countryside, charms imagined Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
formulae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
lesbia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74
lucretius, allusion to ciceros aratea in drn Gee, Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition (2013) 70
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
lucretius, formulae in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
lucretius, mirabilia in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74, 222
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
mirabilia, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
plato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 199
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
templum' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 21, 22
vertumnus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 74