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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 2.1-2.61


nanBOOK II: PROEM 'Tis sweet, when, down the mighty main, the winds Roll up its waste of waters, from the land To watch another's labouring anguish far, Not that we joyously delight that man Should thus be smitten, but because 'tis sweet To mark what evils we ourselves be spared; 'Tis sweet, again, to view the mighty strife Of armies embattled yonder o'er the plains, Ourselves no sharers in the peril; but naught There is more goodly than to hold the high Serene plateaus, well fortressed by the wise, Whence thou may'st look below on other men And see them ev'rywhere wand'ring, all dispersed In their lone seeking for the road of life; Rivals in genius, or emulous in rank, Pressing through days and nights with hugest toil For summits of power and mastery of the world. O wretched minds of men! O blinded hearts! In how great perils, in what darks of life Are spent the human years, however brief!- O not to see that nature for herself Barks after nothing, save that pain keep off, Disjoined from the body, and that mind enjoy Delightsome feeling, far from care and fear! Therefore we see that our corporeal life Needs little, altogether, and only such As takes the pain away, and can besides Strew underneath some number of delights. More grateful 'tis at times (for nature craves No artifice nor luxury), if forsooth There be no golden images of boys Along the halls, with right hands holding out The lamps ablaze, the lights for evening feasts, And if the house doth glitter not with gold Nor gleam with silver, and to the lyre resound No fretted and gilded ceilings overhead, Yet still to lounge with friends in the soft grass Beside a river of water, underneath A big tree's boughs, and merrily to refresh Our frames, with no vast outlay- most of all If the weather is laughing and the times of the year Besprinkle the green of the grass around with flowers. Nor yet the quicker will hot fevers go, If on a pictured tapestry thou toss, Or purple robe, than if 'tis thine to lie Upon the poor man's bedding. Wherefore, since Treasure, nor rank, nor glory of a reign Avail us naught for this our body, thus Reckon them likewise nothing for the mind: Save then perchance, when thou beholdest forth Thy legions swarming round the Field of Mars, Rousing a mimic warfare- either side Strengthened with large auxiliaries and horse, Alike equipped with arms, alike inspired; Or save when also thou beholdest forth Thy fleets to swarm, deploying down the sea: For then, by such bright circumstance abashed, Religion pales and flees thy mind; O then The fears of death leave heart so free of care. But if we note how all this pomp at last Is but a drollery and a mocking sport, And of a truth man's dread, with cares at heels, Dreads not these sounds of arms, these savage swords But among kings and lords of all the world Mingles undaunted, nor is overawed By gleam of gold nor by the splendour bright Of purple robe, canst thou then doubt that this Is aught, but power of thinking?- when, besides The whole of life but labours in the dark. For just as children tremble and fear all In the viewless dark, so even we at times Dread in the light so many things that be No whit more fearsome than what children feign, Shuddering, will be upon them in the dark. This terror then, this darkness of the mind, Not sunrise with its flaring spokes of light, Nor glittering arrows of morning can disperse, But only nature's aspect and her law. ATOMIC MOTIONS Now come: I will untangle for thy steps Now by what motions the begetting bodies Of the world-stuff beget the varied world, And then forever resolve it when begot, And by what force they are constrained to this, And what the speed appointed unto them Wherewith to travel down the vast inane: Do thou remember to yield thee to my words. For truly matter coheres not, crowds not tight, Since we behold each thing to wane away, And we observe how all flows on and off, As 'twere, with age-old time, and from our eyes How eld withdraws each object at the end, Albeit the sum is seen to bide the same, Unharmed, because these motes that leave each thing Diminish what they part from, but endow With increase those to which in turn they come, Constraining these to wither in old age, And those to flower at the prime (and yet Biding not long among them). Thus the sum Forever is replenished, and we live As mortals by eternal give and take. The nations wax, the nations wane away; In a brief space the generations pass, And like to runners hand the lamp of life One unto other.


Suave, mari magno turbantibus aequora ventisBOOK II: PROEM 'Tis sweet, when, down the mighty main, the winds Roll up its waste of waters, from the land To watch another's labouring anguish far, Not that we joyously delight that man Should thus be smitten, but because 'tis sweet To mark what evils we ourselves be spared; 'Tis sweet, again, to view the mighty strife Of armies embattled yonder o'er the plains, Ourselves no sharers in the peril; but naught There is more goodly than to hold the high Serene plateaus, well fortressed by the wise, Whence thou may'st look below on other men And see them ev'rywhere wand'ring, all dispersed In their lone seeking for the road of life; Rivals in genius, or emulous in rank, Pressing through days and nights with hugest toil For summits of power and mastery of the world. O wretched minds of men! O blinded hearts! In how great perils, in what darks of life Are spent the human years, however brief!- O not to see that nature for herself Barks after nothing, save that pain keep off, Disjoined from the body, and that mind enjoy Delightsome feeling, far from care and fear! Therefore we see that our corporeal life Needs little, altogether, and only such As takes the pain away, and can besides Strew underneath some number of delights. More grateful 'tis at times (for nature craves No artifice nor luxury), if forsooth There be no golden images of boys Along the halls, with right hands holding out The lamps ablaze, the lights for evening feasts, And if the house doth glitter not with gold Nor gleam with silver, and to the lyre resound No fretted and gilded ceilings overhead, Yet still to lounge with friends in the soft grass Beside a river of water, underneath A big tree's boughs, and merrily to refresh Our frames, with no vast outlay- most of all If the weather is laughing and the times of the year Besprinkle the green of the grass around with flowers. Nor yet the quicker will hot fevers go, If on a pictured tapestry thou toss, Or purple robe, than if 'tis thine to lie Upon the poor man's bedding. Wherefore, since Treasure, nor rank, nor glory of a reign Avail us naught for this our body, thus Reckon them likewise nothing for the mind: Save then perchance, when thou beholdest forth Thy legions swarming round the Field of Mars, Rousing a mimic warfare- either side Strengthened with large auxiliaries and horse, Alike equipped with arms, alike inspired; Or save when also thou beholdest forth Thy fleets to swarm, deploying down the sea: For then, by such bright circumstance abashed, Religion pales and flees thy mind; O then The fears of death leave heart so free of care. But if we note how all this pomp at last Is but a drollery and a mocking sport, And of a truth man's dread, with cares at heels, Dreads not these sounds of arms, these savage swords But among kings and lords of all the world Mingles undaunted, nor is overawed By gleam of gold nor by the splendour bright Of purple robe, canst thou then doubt that this Is aught, but power of thinking?- when, besides The whole of life but labours in the dark. For just as children tremble and fear all In the viewless dark, so even we at times Dread in the light so many things that be No whit more fearsome than what children feign, Shuddering, will be upon them in the dark. This terror then, this darkness of the mind, Not sunrise with its flaring spokes of light, Nor glittering arrows of morning can disperse, But only nature's aspect and her law. ATOMIC MOTIONS Now come: I will untangle for thy steps Now by what motions the begetting bodies Of the world-stuff beget the varied world, And then forever resolve it when begot, And by what force they are constrained to this, And what the speed appointed unto them Wherewith to travel down the vast inane: Do thou remember to yield thee to my words. For truly matter coheres not, crowds not tight, Since we behold each thing to wane away, And we observe how all flows on and off, As 'twere, with age-old time, and from our eyes How eld withdraws each object at the end, Albeit the sum is seen to bide the same, Unharmed, because these motes that leave each thing Diminish what they part from, but endow With increase those to which in turn they come, Constraining these to wither in old age, And those to flower at the prime (and yet Biding not long among them). Thus the sum Forever is replenished, and we live As mortals by eternal give and take. The nations wax, the nations wane away; In a brief space the generations pass, And like to runners hand the lamp of life One unto other.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 5.291, 5.388-5.389, 8.83-8.88, 12.212 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, On Laws, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Republic, 1.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. im petu liberavissent, nec C. Duelius, A. Atilius, L. Metellus terrore Karthaginis, non duo Scipiones oriens incendium belli Punici secundi sanguine suo restinxissent, nec id excitatum maioribus copiis aut Q. Maximus enervavisset aut M. Marcellus contudisset aut a portis huius urbis avolsum P. Africanus compulisset intra hostium moenia. M. vero Catoni, homini ignoto et novo, quo omnes, qui isdem rebus studemus, quasi exemplari ad industriam virtutemque ducimur, certe licuit Tusculi se in otio delectare salubri et propinquo loco. Sed homo demens, ut isti putant, cum cogeret eum necessitas nulla, in his undis et tempestatibus ad summam senectutem maluit iactari quam in illa tranquillitate atque otio iucundissime vivere. Omitto innumerabilis viros, quorum singuli saluti huic civitati fuerunt, et quia sunt haud procul ab aetatis huius memoria, commemorare eos desino, ne quis se aut suorum aliquem praetermissum queratur. Unum hoc definio, tantam esse necessitatem virtutis generi hominum a natura tantumque amorem ad communem salutem defendendam datum, ut ea vis omnia blandimenta voluptatis otiique vicerit. 1.1. Plin. Nat. praef. 7 nec docti/ssimis. †Manium Persium haec le/gere nolo, Iu/nium Congu/m volo.
6. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.158, 2.2.160 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.79, 5.95-5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.79. ne ne n onne K ( ss. 2 ) illa quidem firmissima consolatio est, quamquam quamquam quidquam K 1 et usitata est et saepe prodest: non tibi hoc soli. prodest haec quidem, ut dixi, dixi p. 345, 13 sed nec semper nec omnibus; sunt enim qui respuant; sed refert, quo modo adhibeatur. ut enim enim om. G 1 tulerit quisque eorum qui sapienter tulerunt, non quo quisque incommodo adfectus sit, praedicandum est. Chrysippi crys. KR chris. G ad veritatem firmissima est, ad tempus aegritudinis difficilis. magnum opus opus s onus X est probare maerenti illum suo iudicio et, quod se se exp. V 2 ita putet oportere facere, maerere. Nimirum igitur, ut in causis non semper utimur eodem statu—sic enim appellamus controversiarum genera—, sed ad tempus, ad controversiae naturam, ad personam accommodamus, sic in aegritudine lenienda, quam lenienda. nam quam X nam del. s quisque curationem recipere possit, videndum est. nimirum ... 26 est H 5.95. Totumque fr. 439 hoc de voluptate sic ille praecipit, ut voluptatem ipsam per se, quia voluptas sit, semper optandam et et add. s cf. p. 423, 4 de orat. 1, 231 al. (asyndeton ipsum tolerari potest cf. exsibilatur exploditur parad. 26) expetendam putet, eademque ratione dolorem ob id ipsum, quia dolor sit, semper esse fugiendum; itaque hac usurum compensatione conpensatione K sapientem, ut et ut et s ut om. X et om. voluptatem fugiat, si ea eam maiorem dolorem effectura sit, et dolorem suscipiat maiorem efficientem voluptatem; omniaque iucunda, iocunda GR 1 ( ss. 1 ) quamquam sensu corporis iudicentur, ad animum referri tamen. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
8. Catullus, Poems, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Horace, Epodes, 16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.57, 1.1.60, 1.4.108, 1.4.116, 1.4.118-1.4.120, 1.6.71, 1.6.99-1.6.101, 1.6.130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.24, 1.39-1.40, 1.54-1.79, 1.81-1.82, 1.127-1.145, 1.332, 1.370-1.371, 1.584-1.586, 1.659, 1.711, 1.761-1.762, 1.927-1.928, 1.947, 1.996-1.998, 1.1021-1.1028, 2.2-2.66, 2.80-2.82, 2.92-2.99, 2.123-2.124, 2.229, 2.317-2.332, 2.398-2.399, 2.504, 2.552-2.566, 2.650, 2.967-2.968, 2.1090-2.1092, 3.1-3.3, 3.11-3.13, 3.22, 3.31-3.93, 3.105, 3.251-3.255, 3.319-3.322, 3.966, 3.998, 3.1042-3.1044, 3.1052, 3.1057-3.1067, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.824, 4.967-4.968, 4.1133-4.1134, 5.8, 5.10-5.21, 5.49-5.51, 5.54-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.94-5.96, 5.102, 5.373-5.375, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1105-5.1135, 5.1203, 5.1226-5.1232, 5.1430-5.1435, 6.1-6.80, 6.86, 6.90-6.95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.23-1.15.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Ovid, Fasti, 1.301 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures
14. Ovid, Tristia, 1.2, 1.2.19-1.2.23, 2.423-2.426 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 8.2 (1st cent. BCE

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.103-1.107, 1.202-1.206, 1.446-1.495 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.104. Then Aeolus: “'T is thy sole task, O Queen 1.105. to weigh thy wish and will. My fealty 1.106. thy high behest obeys. This humble throne 1.107. is of thy gift. Thy smiles for me obtain 1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 1.446. her spotted mantle was; perchance she roused 1.448. So Venus spoke, and Venus' son replied: 1.449. “No voice or vision of thy sister fair 1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 1.494. to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where
17. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.6, 4.40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.6. it careless in the shade, and, at your call 4.40. yet shall there lurk within of ancient wrong
18. Vergil, Georgics, 1.127-1.128, 2.35-2.46, 2.438-2.439, 2.455, 2.458-2.474, 2.495-2.540, 4.8-4.50, 4.125-4.146, 4.205, 4.210-4.214, 4.228-4.280 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 2.35. Truncheons cleft four-wise, or sharp-pointed stakes; 2.36. Some forest-trees the layer's bent arch await 2.37. And slips yet quick within the parent-soil; 2.38. No root need others, nor doth the pruner's hand 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.438. Take heed to hide them, and dig in withal 2.439. Rough shells or porous stone, for therebetween 2.455. From story up to story. 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.461. With keen-edged sickle, but let the leaves alone 2.462. Be culled with clip of fingers here and there. 2.463. But when they clasp the elms with sturdy trunk 2.464. Erect, then strip the leaves off, prune the boughs; 2.465. Sooner they shrink from steel, but then put forth 2.466. The arm of power, and stem the branchy tide. 2.467. Hedges too must be woven and all beast 2.468. Barred entrance, chiefly while the leaf is young 2.469. And witless of disaster; for therewith 2.470. Beside harsh winters and o'erpowering sun 2.471. Wild buffaloes and pestering goats for ay 2.472. Besport them, sheep and heifers glut their greed. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.502. Round on the labourer spins the wheel of toil 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 2.505. And the chill north wind from the forests shook 2.506. Their coronal, even then the careful swain 2.507. Looks keenly forward to the coming year 2.508. With Saturn's curved fang pursues and prune 2.509. The vine forlorn, and lops it into shape. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.511. And burn the refuse-branches, first to house 2.512. Again your vine-poles, last to gather fruit. 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 2.527. When once they have gripped the soil, and borne the breeze. 2.528. Earth of herself, with hooked fang laid bare 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 2.530. The ploughshare aiding; therewithal thou'lt rear 2.531. The olive's fatness well-beloved of Peace. 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 4.8. Slight though the poet's theme, not slight the praise 4.9. So frown not heaven, and Phoebus hear his call. 4.10. First find your bees a settled sure abode 4.11. Where neither winds can enter (winds blow back 4.12. The foragers with food returning home) 4.13. Nor sheep and butting kids tread down the flowers 4.14. Nor heifer wandering wide upon the plain 4.15. Dash off the dew, and bruise the springing blades. 4.16. Let the gay lizard too keep far aloof 4.17. His scale-clad body from their honied stalls 4.18. And the bee-eater, and what birds beside 4.19. And Procne smirched with blood upon the breast 4.20. From her own murderous hands. For these roam wide 4.21. Wasting all substance, or the bees themselve 4.22. Strike flying, and in their beaks bear home, to glut 4.23. Those savage nestlings with the dainty prey. 4.24. But let clear springs and moss-green pools be near 4.25. And through the grass a streamlet hurrying run 4.26. Some palm-tree o'er the porch extend its shade 4.27. Or huge-grown oleaster, that in Spring 4.28. Their own sweet Spring-tide, when the new-made chief 4.29. Lead forth the young swarms, and, escaped their comb 4.30. The colony comes forth to sport and play 4.31. The neighbouring bank may lure them from the heat 4.32. Or bough befriend with hospitable shade. 4.33. O'er the mid-waters, whether swift or still 4.34. Cast willow-branches and big stones enow 4.35. Bridge after bridge, where they may footing find 4.36. And spread their wide wings to the summer sun 4.37. If haply Eurus, swooping as they pause 4.38. Have dashed with spray or plunged them in the deep. 4.39. And let green cassias and far-scented thymes 4.40. And savory with its heavy-laden breath 4.41. Bloom round about, and violet-beds hard by 4.42. Sip sweetness from the fertilizing springs. 4.43. For the hive's self, or stitched of hollow bark 4.44. Or from tough osier woven, let the door 4.45. Be strait of entrance; for stiff winter's cold 4.46. Congeals the honey, and heat resolves and thaws 4.47. To bees alike disastrous; not for naught 4.48. So haste they to cement the tiny pore 4.49. That pierce their walls, and fill the crevice 4.50. With pollen from the flowers, and glean and keep 4.125. Symmetric: this the likelier breed; from these 4.126. When heaven brings round the season, thou shalt strain 4.127. Sweet honey, nor yet so sweet as passing clear 4.128. And mellowing on the tongue the wine-god's fire. 4.129. But when the swarms fly aimlessly abroad 4.130. Disport themselves in heaven and spurn their cells 4.131. Leaving the hive unwarmed, from such vain play 4.132. Must you refrain their volatile desires 4.133. Nor hard the task: tear off the monarchs' wings; 4.134. While these prove loiterers, none beside will dare 4.135. Mount heaven, or pluck the standards from the camp. 4.136. Let gardens with the breath of saffron flower 4.137. Allure them, and the lord of placeName key= 4.138. Priapus, wielder of the willow-scythe 4.139. Safe in his keeping hold from birds and thieves. 4.140. And let the man to whom such cares are dear 4.141. Himself bring thyme and pine-trees from the heights 4.142. And strew them in broad belts about their home; 4.143. No hand but his the blistering task should ply 4.144. Plant the young slips, or shed the genial showers. 4.145. And I myself, were I not even now 4.146. Furling my sails, and, nigh the journey's end 4.205. By settled order ply their tasks afield; 4.210. Others the while lead forth the full-grown young 4.211. Their country's hope, and others press and pack 4.212. The thrice repured honey, and stretch their cell 4.213. To bursting with the clear-strained nectar sweet. 4.214. Some, too, the wardship of the gates befalls 4.228. Not otherwise, to measure small with great 4.229. The love of getting planted in their breast 4.230. Goads on the bees, that haunt old Cecrops' heights 4.231. Each in his sphere to labour. The old have charge 4.232. To keep the town, and build the walled combs 4.233. And mould the cunning chambers; but the youth 4.234. Their tired legs packed with thyme, come labouring home 4.235. Belated, for afar they range to feed 4.236. On arbutes and the grey-green willow-leaves 4.237. And cassia and the crocus blushing red 4.238. Glue-yielding limes, and hyacinths dusky-eyed. 4.239. One hour for rest have all, and one for toil: 4.240. With dawn they hurry from the gates—no room 4.241. For loiterers there: and once again, when even 4.242. Now bids them quit their pasturing on the plain 4.243. Then homeward make they, then refresh their strength: 4.244. A hum arises: hark! they buzz and buzz 4.245. About the doors and threshold; till at length 4.246. Safe laid to rest they hush them for the night 4.247. And welcome slumber laps their weary limbs. 4.248. But from the homestead not too far they fare 4.249. When showers hang like to fall, nor, east winds nigh 4.250. Confide in heaven, but 'neath the city wall 4.251. Safe-circling fetch them water, or essay 4.252. Brief out-goings, and oft weigh-up tiny stones 4.253. As light craft ballast in the tossing tide 4.254. Wherewith they poise them through the cloudy vast. 4.255. This law of life, too, by the bees obeyed 4.256. Will move thy wonder, that nor sex with sex 4.257. Yoke they in marriage, nor yield their limbs to love 4.258. Nor know the pangs of labour, but alone 4.259. From leaves and honied herbs, the mothers, each 4.260. Gather their offspring in their mouths, alone 4.261. Supply new kings and pigmy commonwealth 4.262. And their old court and waxen realm repair. 4.263. oft, too, while wandering, against jagged stone 4.264. Their wings they fray, and 'neath the burden yield 4.265. Their liberal lives: so deep their love of flowers 4.266. So glorious deem they honey's proud acquist. 4.267. Therefore, though each a life of narrow span 4.268. Ne'er stretched to summers more than seven, befalls 4.269. Yet deathless doth the race endure, and still 4.270. Perennial stands the fortune of their line 4.271. From grandsire unto grandsire backward told. 4.272. Moreover, not placeName key= 4.273. of boundless placeName key= 4.274. Nor Median Hydaspes, to their king 4.275. Do such obeisance: lives the king unscathed 4.276. One will inspires the million: is he dead 4.277. Snapt is the bond of fealty; they themselve 4.278. Ravage their toil-wrought honey, and rend amain 4.279. Their own comb's waxen trellis. He is the lord 4.280. of all their labour; him with awful eye
19. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 3.1-3.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90.8, 90.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Annals, 1.33, 3.76, 16.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.33.  In the meantime, Germanicus, as we have stated, was traversing the Gallic provinces and assessing their tribute, when the message came that Augustus was no more. Married to the late emperor's granddaughter Agrippina, who had borne him several children, and himself a grandchild of the dowager (he was the son of Tiberius' brother Drusus), he was tormented none the less by the secret hatred of his uncle and grandmother — hatred springing from motives the more potent because iniquitous. For Drusus was still a living memory to the nation, and it was believed that, had he succeeded, he would have restored the age of liberty; whence the same affection and hopes centred on the young Germanicus with his unassuming disposition and his exceptional courtesy, so far removed from the inscrutable arrogance of word and look which characterized Tiberius. Feminine animosities increased the tension as Livia had a stepmother's irritable dislike of Agrippina, whose own temper was not without a hint of fire, though purity of mind and wifely devotion kept her rebellious spirit on the side of righteousness. 3.76.  Junia, too, born niece to Cato, wife of Caius Cassius, sister of Marcus Brutus, looked her last on life, sixty-three full years after the field of Philippi. Her will was busily discussed by the crowd; because in disposing of her great wealth she mentioned nearly every patrician of note in complimentary terms, but omitted the Caesar. The slur was taken in good part, and he offered no objection to the celebration of her funeral with a panegyric at the Rostra and the rest of the customary ceremonies. The effigies of twenty great houses preceded her to the tomb — members of the Manlian and Quinctian families, and names of equal splendour. But Brutus and Cassius shone brighter than all by the very fact that their portraits were unseen. 16.7.  To the death of Poppaea, outwardly regretted, but welcome to all who remembered her profligacy and cruelty, Nero added a fresh measure of odium by prohibiting Gaius Cassius from attendance at the funeral. It was the first hint of mischief. Nor was the mischief long delayed. Silanus was associated with him; their only crime being that Cassius was eminent for a great hereditary fortune and an austere character, Silanus for a noble lineage and a temperate youth. Accordingly, the emperor sent a speech to the senate, arguing that both should be removed from public life, and objecting to the former that, among his other ancestral effigies, he had honoured a bust of Gaius Cassius, inscribed:— "To the leader of the cause." The seeds of civil war, and revolt from the house of the Caesars, — such were the objects he had pursued. And, not to rely merely on the memory of a hated name as an incentive to faction, he had taken to himself a partner in Lucius Silanus, a youth of noble family and headstrong temper, who was to be his figure-head for a revolution.
22. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0
23. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0
24. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 129-131, 135, 128

25. Epicurus, Vatican Sayings, 33, 25

26. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 8

27. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.126



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abstract and actual, interplay of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
abstractions divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
achilles Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 26
aeneas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
akrasia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 273
akratic vs. enkratic Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 273
alexis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
ambitio (canvassing) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
aristotle Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
asmis, elizabeth Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 62
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170, 235, 240
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
attention Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
autarky Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 302
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108, 112
avarice, condemned Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 94
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 26, 139, 223, 224
bible, responses to Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
bion of borysthenes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 94, 152
blindness, moral Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
campus martius, canvassing on Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
canvassing (ambitio) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
cassius longinus, c., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
catharsis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
cato Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
catullus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
chance (τύχη) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
cicero, marcus tullius, rome imagined Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
cicero, platonizing roman statesman, orator, endurance of others as model Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
cicero Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58, 110; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
consolation writings, lot of others Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
consolation writings, others have coped Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
corycian gardener Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
curia (senate-house) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
danaans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
death Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
deification, of epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
deification, of octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
desire Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
despicere (looking down) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
disease, as a sublime spectacle Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 157
disposition (διάθεσις) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
divinization of abstractions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
dolor Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 110
ekphrasis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
epicurean garden Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicureanism, ethics of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
epicureans, epicureanism Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 302
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
epicurus/epicureanism, hedonic calculus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65, 185, 186
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 26
ethics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
fear, as moral blindness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223, 224
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
forums, imperial Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
friendship, epicurean Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
frugality Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
furor Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170
gardens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
ghosts Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 224
glad, clarence Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 94
goal of life Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
gods, abstractions divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
gods Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 302; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 26, 223
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
greek terms, ἡδονή Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 110
hannibal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
happiness Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 94
homer Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 26
horace, fathers teachings/influence on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 152
ideal ~ Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 231
imagery, journey Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 235
imagery, solar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 26
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
intertextuality Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 26
jerome, st, church father, chastity Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
julius caesar, c., image in jupiter capitolinus temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
junia tertulla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
junius brutus, m., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
kinship Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
labor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170, 182, 187
lararium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
laurenti, renato Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 62
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
lesbian lyrical poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 231
liber Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
looking down (despicere) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
lucretius, epicurean, pleasure in safe viewing of storm-tossed non-epicureans Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
lucretius, labor in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 240
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182, 235, 240
lucretius Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58, 110; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 231, 302, 323, 380; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65, 185, 186
lucretius observer Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 240
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 224
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
odysseus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170
otium Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 323
ovid, akrasia in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 273
ovid, and epicurus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ovid, as epic hero in exile Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 254
ovid, hedonic calculus in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ovid, natural philosophy in exilic corpus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 254
ovid, paradoxography Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 254
ovid Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 157
pain Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 110; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 235
personification Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
phaeacians Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
phidias, and olympian zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
philemon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
philodemus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223
pity Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
plague, as a sublime spectacle Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 157
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 240; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223, 224
pleasure, katastematic Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
pleasure, pleasure in safe viewing of storm-tossed Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
pleasure Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 110; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
pliny the elder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
plutarch, on divine nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187, 235
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 240
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 26, 170, 182, 187, 235
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
pyrrhonian sceptics, apatheia for emotions Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139, 223, 224
religion Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
religions, roman, abstractions divinized Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
satires (horace), treatment of economic issues Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 94
sea/seafaring Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
seneca, the younger, stoic, endurance by others Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
seneca, the younger, stoic, lotofothers Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
seneca the younger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 139
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
silius italicus, venerates vergils image Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
siro Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
slaves Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
social philosophy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
soul Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 224
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statuary, sacred nature of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
stoicism Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58
stoics/stoicism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 273
storms in tristia, figuratively, of mental turmoil Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 273
storms in tristia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 254, 273
sublime, the Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 157
sudhaus, siegfried Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 62
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tarentum Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
therapy, techniques see esp. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 118
tibullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 231
timocles, comic poet Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
titinius capito, cn., venerates brutus and cassius images Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tomis, environmental extremes Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 254
torquatus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 110
tranquility (ἀταραξία) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170, 187
trojans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223, 224
tsouna(-mckirahan), voula Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 62
tsouna, voula Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
tullius cicero, m., on sacred nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
underworld Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
valerius maximus, compiler Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 26
vergil, image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
vergil, on junos temple at carthage Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
verres, c., and the verralia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., public statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., statues overturned Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 187
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
virgil Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 58; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 231
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 235
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 240
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 182, 235, 240
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170
war Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 129
water imagery Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 157
wealth Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 179
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 170
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 224
zeus, olympian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108