Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.737-1.738
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46, 24.40 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 368-371, 367 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

367. ἰπούμενος ῥίζαισιν Αἰτναίαις ὕπο·
3. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, 53 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Empedocles, Fragments, 28-29, 27 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Callimachus, Aetia, 1.3-1.4 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6. Callimachus, Hymn To Apollo, 112, 111 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7. Callimachus, Hymn To Delos, 94 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, De Oratore, 1.217 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.217. Nam si ut quisque in aliqua arte et facultate excellens aliam quoque artem sibi adsumpserit, is perficiet ut, quod praeterea sciet, id eius, in quo excellet, pars quaedam esse videatur, licet ista ratione dicamus pila bene et duodecim scriptis ludere proprium esse iuris civilis, quoniam utrumque eorum P. Mucius optime fecerit; eademque ratione dicantur ei quos fusikou/s Graeci nomit eidem poetae, quoniam Empedocles physicus egregium poema fecerit. At hoc ne philosophi quidem ipsi, qui omnia sicut propria sua esse atque a se possideri volunt, dicere audent, geometriam aut musicam philosophi esse, quia Platonem omnes in illis artibus praestantissimum fuisse fateantur.
9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.62-1.79, 1.112-1.126, 1.635-1.736, 1.738-1.920, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.600-2.643, 2.645, 2.1001, 2.1039, 3.18-3.22, 3.294-3.298, 3.371, 5.111-5.121, 5.490-5.491, 5.564-5.573, 5.592-5.613, 5.622, 5.1204, 6.76, 6.286, 6.388, 6.644, 6.670, 6.680-6.693, 6.1228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Ovid, Fasti, 3.313-3.314, 3.323-3.326, 4.649-4.668 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.313. Through our admission: our powers have their limits. 3.314. We are rural gods who rule in the high mountains: 3.323. From the snare, or what spells they spoke, or by what art 3.324. They drew Jupiter from his realm above. My song will sing 3.325. of lawful things, such as a poet may speak with pious lips. 3.326. The drew you (eliciunt) from the sky, Jupiter, and later 4.649. There was an ancient wood, long untouched by the axe 4.650. Still sacred to Pan, the god of Maenalus: 4.651. He gave answers, to calm minds, in night silence. 4.652. Here Numa sacrificed twin ewes. 4.653. The first fell to Faunus, the second to gentle Sleep: 4.654. Both the fleeces were spread on the hard soil. 4.655. Twice the king’s unshorn head was sprinkled with spring water 4.656. Twice he pressed the beech leaves to his forehead. 4.657. He abstained from sex: no meat might be served 4.658. At table, nor could he wear a ring on any finger. 4.659. Dressed in rough clothes he lay down on fresh fleeces 4.660. Having worshipped the god with appropriate words. 4.661. Meanwhile Night arrived, her calm brow wreathed 4.662. With poppies: bringing with her shadowy dreams. 4.663. Faunus appeared, and pressing the fleece with a hard hoof 4.664. From the right side of the bed, he uttered these words: 4.665. ‘King, you must appease Earth, with the death of two cows: 4.666. Let one heifer give two lives, in sacrifice.’ 4.667. Fear banished sleep: Numa pondered the vision 4.668. And considered the ambiguous and dark command.
11. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.81-7.103 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.81. Laurentian, which his realm and people bear. 7.82. Unto this tree-top, wonderful to tell 7.83. came hosts of bees, with audible acclaim 7.84. voyaging the stream of air, and seized a place 7.85. on the proud, pointing crest, where the swift swarm 7.86. with interlacement of close-clinging feet 7.87. wung from the leafy bough. “Behold, there comes,” 7.88. the prophet cried, “a husband from afar! 7.89. To the same region by the self-same path 7.90. behold an arm'd host taking lordly sway 7.91. upon our city's crown!” Soon after this 7.92. when, coming to the shrine with torches pure 7.93. Lavinia kindled at her father's side 7.94. the sacrifice, swift seemed the flame to burn 7.95. along her flowing hair—O sight of woe! 7.96. Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew 7.97. lighting her queenly tresses and her crown 7.98. of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud 7.99. from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. 7.100. This omen dread and wonder terrible 7.101. was rumored far: for prophet-voices told 7.102. bright honors on the virgin's head to fall
12. Vergil, Eclogues, 4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Vergil, Georgics, 1.471-1.473 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy:
14. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.4.4, 10.1.52-10.1.58 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.4.4.  Nor is it sufficient to have read the poets only; every kind of writer must be carefully studied, not merely for the subject matter, but for the vocabulary; for words often acquire authority from their use by a particular author. Nor can such training be regarded as complete if it stop short of music, for the teacher of literature has to speak of metre and rhythm: nor again if he be ignorant of astronomy, can he understand the poets; for they, to mention no further points, frequently give their indications of time by reference to the rising and setting of the stars. Ignorance of philosophy is an equal drawback, since there are numerous passages in almost every poem based on the most intricate questions of natural philosophy, while among the Greeks we have Empedocles and among our own poets Varro and Lucretius, all of whom have expounded their philosophies in verse.
15. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 1.4.4, 10.1.58 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.4.4.  Nor is it sufficient to have read the poets only; every kind of writer must be carefully studied, not merely for the subject matter, but for the vocabulary; for words often acquire authority from their use by a particular author. Nor can such training be regarded as complete if it stop short of music, for the teacher of literature has to speak of metre and rhythm: nor again if he be ignorant of astronomy, can he understand the poets; for they, to mention no further points, frequently give their indications of time by reference to the rising and setting of the stars. Ignorance of philosophy is an equal drawback, since there are numerous passages in almost every poem based on the most intricate questions of natural philosophy, while among the Greeks we have Empedocles and among our own poets Varro and Lucretius, all of whom have expounded their philosophies in verse.
16. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 77, 76

17. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.30-1.37, 1.735-1.749, 5.538-5.619



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
allegorist (stoic) Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and annaeus cornutus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and cicero Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), and manilius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
allegory, allegoresis, allegorization, allegorical (exegesis, image, interpretation, reading), stoic Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
anaxagoras Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
andromeda (manilius myth of) Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
apollo Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 62
aristotle Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 135
astronomy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
atomism, atomists Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
atomism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
brown, robert Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 135
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
bucolic poetry, full of learned allusions Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
callimachus Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 134, 135
cicero Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
clarity/clear Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150
cosmic cycle, empedocles Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
cosmology, biological model of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
empedocles, death by leaping into etna Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
empedocles, influence on roman authors Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
empedocles Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 233; Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 134; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
epicurus/epicureanism, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
epicurus/epicureanism Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
eudoxus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
faunus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
genre Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 62
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
gigantomachy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 37
god Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
heraclitean thought Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
heraclitus Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150
heraclitus (of ephesus) Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
hexameter (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 62
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
hymns, callimachean Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 135
imagery, gigantomachy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
jupiter, elicius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
leucippus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
lucretius, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
metallic ages, in empedocles Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
metallic ages, in vergil, eclogue Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
neikos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
numa Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
obscurity/obscure Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150
oracular, philosophy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 37
oracularimagery Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
phaethon Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179
philodemus, and parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
physical elements Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
picus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
plato Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
presocratics Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 150
prometheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
rome Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 62
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
seeds, in epicurean physics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sicily, empedocles birthplace Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 134, 135
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
stars Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
stoicism, stoics, cosmology of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
techne, teleology Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
templum' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
theoxeny, in the hesiodic catalogue of women Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
typhoeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
vates ovid as Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 141
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
vergil, alludes to other versions of the metallic ages Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
vergil, metallic ages in Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 94
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
war, in presocratic philosophy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 233
world formation Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 169
zeus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 179