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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.72-1.75
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30 results
1. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 368-371, 367 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

367. ἰπούμενος ῥίζαισιν Αἰτναίαις ὕπο·
2. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Electra, 641-643, 640 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Callimachus, Aetia, 1.25-1.28 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, Brutus, 46 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

46. itaque ait Aristoteles, cum sublatis in Sicilia Sicilia G : Siciliam L tyrannis res privatae longo intervallo iudiciis repeterentur, tum primum, quod esset acuta illa gens et controversia †natura et controversia natura L : et controversa in ea iura Madvig : et controversia nata Peter : et controversiis nata Jacobs : et c. matura Martha , artem et praecepta Siculos Coracem et Tisiam conscripsisse—nam antea neminem solitum via nec arte, sed accurate tamen et descripte descripte Schmitz : de scripto L plerosque dicere—; scriptas- que fuisse et paratas a Protagora rerum inlustrium disputa- tiones, qui qui Eberhard : quae L nunc communes appellantur loci;
9. Cicero, Brutus, 46 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

46. itaque ait Aristoteles, cum sublatis in Sicilia Sicilia G : Siciliam L tyrannis res privatae longo intervallo iudiciis repeterentur, tum primum, quod esset acuta illa gens et controversia †natura et controversia natura L : et controversa in ea iura Madvig : et controversia nata Peter : et controversiis nata Jacobs : et c. matura Martha , artem et praecepta Siculos Coracem et Tisiam conscripsisse—nam antea neminem solitum via nec arte, sed accurate tamen et descripte descripte Schmitz : de scripto L plerosque dicere—; scriptas- que fuisse et paratas a Protagora rerum inlustrium disputa- tiones, qui qui Eberhard : quae L nunc communes appellantur loci;
10. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.43-1.49 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.43. With the errors of the poets may be classed the monstrous doctrines of the magi and the insane mythology of Egypt, and also the popular beliefs, which are a mere mass of inconsistencies sprung from ignorance. "Anyone pondering on the baseless and irrational character of these doctrines ought to regard Epicurus with reverence, and to rank him as one of the very gods about whom we are inquiring. For he alone perceived, first, that the gods exist, because nature herself has imprinted a conception of them on the minds of all mankind. For what nation or what tribe is there but possesses untaught some 'preconception' of the gods? Such notions Epicurus designates by the word prolepsis, that is, a sort of preconceived mental picture of a thing, without which nothing can be understood or investigated or discussed. The force and value of this argument we learn in that work of genius, Epicurus's Rule or Standard of Judgement. 1.44. You see therefore that the foundation (for such it is) of our inquiry has been well and truly laid. For the belief in the gods has not been established by authority, custom or law, but rests on the uimous and abiding consensus of mankind; their existence is therefore a necessary inference, since we possess an instinctive or rather an innate concept of them; but a belief which all men by nature share must necessarily be true; therefore it must be admitted that the gods exist. And since this truth is almost universally accepted not only among philosophers but also among the unlearned, we must admit it as also being an accepted truth that we possess a 'preconception,' as I called it above, or 'prior notion,' of the gods. (For we are bound to employ novel terms to denote novel ideas, just as Epicurus himself employed the word prolepsis in a sense in which no one had ever used it before.) 1.45. We have then a preconception of such a nature that we believe the gods to be blessed and immortal. For nature, which bestowed upon us an idea of the gods themselves, also engraved on our minds the belief that they are eternal and blessed. If this is so, the famous maxim of Epicurus truthfully enunciates that 'that which is blessed and eternal can neither know trouble itself nor cause trouble to another, and accordingly cannot feel either anger or favour, since all such things belong only to the weak.' "If we sought to attain nothing else beside piety in worshipping the gods and freedom from superstition, what has been said had sufficed; since the exalted nature of the gods, being both eternal and supremely blessed, would receive man's pious worship (for what is highest commands the reverence that is its due); and furthermore all fear of the divine power or divine anger would have been banished (since it is understood that anger and favour alike are excluded from the nature of a being at once blessed and immortal, and that these being eliminated we are menaced by no fears in regard to the powers above). But the mind strives to strengthen this belief by trying to discover the form of god, the mode of his activity, and the operation of his intelligence. 1.46. For the divine form we have the hints of nature supplemented by the teachings of reason. From nature all men of all races derive the notion of gods as having human shape and none other; for in what other shape do they ever appear to anyone, awake or asleep? But not to make primary concepts the sole test of all things, reason itself delivers the same pronouncement. 1.47. For it seems appropriate that the being who is the most exalted, whether by reason of his happiness or his eternity, should also be the most beautiful; but what disposition of the limbs, what cast of features, what shape or outline can be more beautiful than the human form? You Stoics at least, Lucilius, (for my friend Cotta says one thing at one time and another at another) are wont to portray the skill of the divine creator by enlarging on the beauty as well as the utility of design displayed in all parts of the human figure. 1.48. But if the human figure surpasses the form of all other living beings, and god is a living being, god must possess the shape which is the most beautiful of all; and since it is agreed that the gods are supremely happy, and no one can be happy without virtue, and virtue cannot exist without reason, and reason is only found in the human shape, it follows that the gods possess the form of man. 1.49. Yet their form is not corporeal, but only resembles bodily substance; it does not contain blood, but the semblance of blood. "These discoveries of Epicurus are so acute in themselves and so subtly expressed that not everyone would be capable of appreciating them. Still I may rely on your intelligence, and make my exposition briefer than the subject demands. Epicurus then, as he not merely discerns abstruse and recondite things with his mind's eye, but handles them as tangible realities, teaches that the substance and nature of the gods is such that, in the first place, it is perceived not by the senses but by the mind, and not materially or individually, like the solid objects which Epicurus in virtue of their substantiality entitles steremnia; but by our perceiving images owing to their similarity and succession, because an endless train of precisely similar images arises from the innumerable atoms and streams towards the gods, our minds with the keenest feelings of pleasure fixes its gaze on these images, and so attains an understanding of the nature of a being both blessed and eternal.
11. Cicero, Republic, 1.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.26. Tum Tubero: Videsne, Africane, quod paulo ante secus tibi videbatur, doc lis, quae videant ceteri. Quid porro aut praeclarum putet in rebus humanis, qui haec deorum regna perspexerit, aut diuturnum, qui cognoverit, quid sit aeternum, aut gloriosum, qui viderit, quam parva sit terra, primum universa, deinde ea pars eius, quam homines incolant, quamque nos in exigua eius parte adfixi plurimis ignotissimi gentibus speremus tamen nostrum nomen volitare et vagari latissime?
12. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.48 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.48. quae quidem quidem culidem R 1 cogitans soleo solo R 1 saepe mirari non nullorum insolentiam philosophorum, qui naturae cognitionem admirantur eiusque inventori et principi gratias exultantes insultantes K 1 agunt eumque venerantur ut deum; liberatos enim se per eum dicunt gravissimis dominis, terrore sempiterno et diurno ac nocturno anoct. ( pro ac noct.)R metu. quo terrore? quo metu? quae est anus tam delira quae timeat ista, quae vos videlicet, si physica phisica KR Enn. Andr. aechm. 107 non didicissetis, timeretis, Acherunsia acheru sia V templa alta Orci, pallida leti, nubila letio nubila GK 1 (b post o add. K c )R let o nubila V (leto n. B) tenebris loca ? non pudet philosophum in eo gloriari, quod haec non timeat et quod falsa esse cognoverit? e quo intellegi potest, quam acuti natura sint, quoniam haec sine doctrina credituri fuerunt.
13. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 34.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Horace, Ars Poetica, 456-466, 455 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.71, 1.73-1.145, 1.202, 1.328, 1.332, 1.370-1.371, 1.442, 1.471-1.482, 1.486, 1.505, 1.586, 1.593, 1.624, 1.634, 1.638, 1.659, 1.711, 1.722-1.725, 1.736-1.741, 1.856, 1.922-1.950, 1.955, 1.968-1.983, 1.992, 1.999, 1.1082, 2.1-2.19, 2.47-2.54, 2.80-2.82, 2.92-2.99, 2.123-2.124, 2.229, 2.242, 2.302, 2.573, 2.605, 2.646-2.651, 2.1042-2.1047, 2.1091-2.1104, 2.1129, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.1-3.30, 3.59-3.78, 3.87-3.93, 3.105, 3.294-3.298, 3.322, 3.416, 3.523-3.525, 3.654-3.656, 3.931-3.949, 3.966, 3.978-3.1023, 3.1042-3.1044, 3.1052, 4.1-4.25, 4.481, 4.488, 4.824, 4.967-4.968, 4.1013-4.1015, 4.1119, 4.1210, 4.1285, 5.1-5.55, 5.84, 5.99, 5.102, 5.109-5.155, 5.165-5.168, 5.181-5.186, 5.194-5.415, 5.509, 5.696-5.697, 5.705-5.706, 5.727-5.730, 5.735, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1104, 5.1129-5.1130, 5.1136-5.1150, 5.1161-5.1240, 5.1271, 5.1281-5.1349, 5.1423-5.1435, 5.1439, 5.1444, 6.1-6.42, 6.50-6.55, 6.60, 6.67, 6.92-6.378, 6.424-6.425, 6.431-6.437, 6.451-6.453, 6.489-6.491, 6.507-6.509, 6.680-6.702, 6.708, 6.906-6.907 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.179, 1.181, 1.203-1.205, 1.213-1.228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Ovid, Fasti, 1.295-1.310, 3.155-3.162, 3.285-3.290, 3.293, 3.306-3.308, 3.323, 3.327-3.328, 3.340-3.343 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.295. What prevents me speaking of the stars, and their rising 1.296. And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised. 1.297. Happy minds that first took the trouble to consider 1.298. These things, and to climb to the celestial regions! 1.299. We can be certain that they raised their head 1.300. Above the failings and the homes of men, alike. 1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures 1.302. Nor public business nor military service: 1.303. They were not seduced by trivial ambitions 1.304. Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth. 1.305. They brought the distant stars within our vision 1.306. And subjected the heavens to their genius. 1.307. So we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled 1.308. On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars. 1.309. Following these masters I too will measure out the skies 1.310. And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates. 3.155. But the calendar was still erratic down to the time 3.156. When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand. 3.157. That god, the founder of a mighty house, did not 3.158. Regard the matter as beneath his attention 3.159. And wished to have prescience of those heaven 3.160. Promised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house. 3.161. He is said to have drawn up an exact table 3.162. of the periods in which the sun returns to its previous signs. 3.293. And she revealed the arts by which they could be caught. 3.306. When sleep vanished, they fought and tried to burst 3.307. Their bonds, which grew tighter the more they struggled. 3.308. Then Numa spoke: ‘Gods of the sacred groves, if you accept 3.323. From the snare, or what spells they spoke, or by what art 3.327. Generations now worship you, by the name of Elicius. 3.328. It’s true that the crowns of the Aventine woods trembled 3.340. The god added: ‘of a man’: ‘You’ll have the hair,’ 3.341. Said the king. He demanded a life, Numa replied: ‘A fish’s’. 3.342. The god laughed and said: ‘Expiate my lightning like this 3.343. O man who cannot be stopped from speaking with gods.
19. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.54-1.56, 2.252-2.253, 5.308-5.309, 5.341-5.345, 15.6, 15.60-15.72, 15.174, 15.176-15.459 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Ovid, Tristia, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.263-1.266, 6.849-6.853 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests
22. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.5, 1.41-1.42, 1.471-1.473, 2.1-2.3, 2.380-2.396, 2.455, 2.458-2.474, 2.490-2.494, 3.1-3.48, 3.244, 3.478-3.566, 4.1-4.7, 4.37, 4.103-4.124, 4.149-4.209, 4.315-4.316, 4.559-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.455. From story up to story. 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.461. With keen-edged sickle, but let the leaves alone 2.462. Be culled with clip of fingers here and there. 2.463. But when they clasp the elms with sturdy trunk 2.464. Erect, then strip the leaves off, prune the boughs; 2.465. Sooner they shrink from steel, but then put forth 2.466. The arm of power, and stem the branchy tide. 2.467. Hedges too must be woven and all beast 2.468. Barred entrance, chiefly while the leaf is young 2.469. And witless of disaster; for therewith 2.470. Beside harsh winters and o'erpowering sun 2.471. Wild buffaloes and pestering goats for ay 2.472. Besport them, sheep and heifers glut their greed. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.244. And rippling plains 'gin shiver with light gusts; 3.478. Many there be who from their mothers keep 3.479. The new-born kids, and straightway bind their mouth 3.480. With iron-tipped muzzles. What they milk at dawn 3.481. Or in the daylight hours, at night they press; 3.482. What darkling or at sunset, this ere morn 3.483. They bear away in baskets—for to town 3.484. The shepherd hies him—or with dash of salt 3.485. Just sprinkle, and lay by for winter use. 3.486. Nor be thy dogs last cared for; but alike 3.487. Swift Spartan hounds and fierce Molossian feed 3.488. On fattening whey. Never, with these to watch 3.489. Dread nightly thief afold and ravening wolves 3.490. Or Spanish desperadoes in the rear. 3.491. And oft the shy wild asses thou wilt chase 3.492. With hounds, too, hunt the hare, with hounds the doe; 3.493. oft from his woodland wallowing-den uprouse 3.494. The boar, and scare him with their baying, and drive 3.495. And o'er the mountains urge into the toil 3.496. Some antlered monster to their chiming cry. 3.497. Learn also scented cedar-wood to burn 3.498. Within the stalls, and snakes of noxious smell 3.499. With fumes of galbanum to drive away. 3.500. oft under long-neglected cribs, or lurk 3.501. A viper ill to handle, that hath fled 3.502. The light in terror, or some snake, that wont 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 3.504. Its bane among the cattle, hugs the ground 3.505. Fell scourge of kine. Shepherd, seize stakes, seize stones! 3.506. And as he rears defiance, and puffs out 3.507. A hissing throat, down with him! see how low 3.508. That cowering crest is vailed in flight, the while 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep 3.531. When chilly showers have probed them to the quick 3.532. And winter stark with hoar-frost, or when sweat 3.533. Unpurged cleaves to them after shearing done 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 3.536. While, plunged beneath the flood, with drenched fell 3.537. The ram, launched free, goes drifting down the tide. 3.538. Else, having shorn, they smear their bodies o'er 3.539. With acrid oil-lees, and mix silver-scum 3.540. And native sulphur and Idaean pitch 3.541. Wax mollified with ointment, and therewith 3.542. Sea-leek, strong hellebores, bitumen black. 3.543. Yet ne'er doth kindlier fortune crown his toil 3.544. Than if with blade of iron a man dare lance 3.545. The ulcer's mouth ope: for the taint is fed 3.546. And quickened by confinement; while the swain 3.547. His hand of healing from the wound withholds 3.548. Or sits for happier signs imploring heaven. 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.551. By thirsty fever are consumed, 'tis good 3.552. To draw the enkindled heat therefrom, and pierce 3.553. Within the hoof-clefts a blood-bounding vein. 3.554. of tribes Bisaltic such the wonted use 3.555. And keen Gelonian, when to 3.556. He flies, or Getic desert, and quaffs milk 3.557. With horse-blood curdled. Seest one far afield 3.558. oft to the shade's mild covert win, or pull 3.559. The grass tops listlessly, or hindmost lag 3.560. Or, browsing, cast her down amid the plain 3.561. At night retire belated and alone; 3.562. With quick knife check the mischief, ere it creep 3.563. With dire contagion through the unwary herd. 3.564. Less thick and fast the whirlwind scours the main 3.565. With tempest in its wake, than swarm the plague 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone 4.1. of air-born honey, gift of heaven, I now 4.2. Take up the tale. Upon this theme no le 4.3. Look thou, Maecenas, with indulgent eye. 4.4. A marvellous display of puny powers 4.5. High-hearted chiefs, a nation's history 4.6. Its traits, its bent, its battles and its clans 4.7. All, each, shall pass before you, while I sing. 4.37. If haply Eurus, swooping as they pause 4.103. Conspicuous by their wings the chiefs themselve 4.104. Press through the heart of battle, and display 4.105. A giant's spirit in each pigmy frame 4.106. Steadfast no inch to yield till these or those 4.107. The victor's ponderous arm has turned to flight. 4.108. Such fiery passions and such fierce assault 4.109. A little sprinkled dust controls and quells. 4.110. And now, both leaders from the field recalled 4.111. Who hath the worser seeming, do to death 4.112. Lest royal waste wax burdensome, but let 4.113. His better lord it on the empty throne. 4.114. One with gold-burnished flakes will shine like fire 4.115. For twofold are their kinds, the nobler he 4.116. of peerless front and lit with flashing scales; 4.117. That other, from neglect and squalor foul 4.118. Drags slow a cumbrous belly. As with kings 4.119. So too with people, diverse is their mould 4.120. Some rough and loathly, as when the wayfarer 4.121. Scapes from a whirl of dust, and scorched with heat 4.122. Spits forth the dry grit from his parched mouth: 4.123. The others shine forth and flash with lightning-gleam 4.124. Their backs all blazoned with bright drops of gold 4.149. Makes the trim garden smile; of placeName key= 4.150. Whose roses bloom and fade and bloom again; 4.151. How endives glory in the streams they drink 4.152. And green banks in their parsley, and how the gourd 4.153. Twists through the grass and rounds him to paunch; 4.154. Nor of Narcissus had my lips been dumb 4.155. That loiterer of the flowers, nor supple-stemmed 4.156. Acanthus, with the praise of ivies pale 4.157. And myrtles clinging to the shores they love. 4.158. For 'neath the shade of tall Oebalia's towers 4.159. Where dark Galaesus laves the yellowing fields 4.160. An old man once I mind me to have seen— 4.161. From Corycus he came—to whom had fallen 4.162. Some few poor acres of neglected land 4.163. And they nor fruitful' neath the plodding steer 4.164. Meet for the grazing herd, nor good for vines. 4.165. Yet he, the while his meagre garden-herb 4.166. Among the thorns he planted, and all round 4.167. White lilies, vervains, and lean poppy set 4.168. In pride of spirit matched the wealth of kings 4.169. And home returning not till night was late 4.170. With unbought plenty heaped his board on high. 4.171. He was the first to cull the rose in spring 4.172. He the ripe fruits in autumn; and ere yet 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive 4.174. The rocks with frost, and with her icy bit 4.175. Curb in the running waters, there was he 4.176. Plucking the rathe faint hyacinth, while he chid 4.177. Summer's slow footsteps and the lagging West. 4.178. Therefore he too with earliest brooding bee 4.179. And their full swarms o'erflowed, and first was he 4.180. To press the bubbling honey from the comb; 4.181. Lime-trees were his, and many a branching pine; 4.182. And all the fruits wherewith in early bloom 4.183. The orchard-tree had clothed her, in full tale 4.184. Hung there, by mellowing autumn perfected. 4.185. He too transplanted tall-grown elms a-row 4.186. Time-toughened pear, thorns bursting with the plum 4.187. And plane now yielding serviceable shade 4.188. For dry lips to drink under: but these things 4.189. Shut off by rigorous limits, I pass by 4.190. And leave for others to sing after me. 4.191. Come, then, I will unfold the natural power 4.192. Great Jove himself upon the bees bestowed 4.193. The boon for which, led by the shrill sweet strain 4.194. of the Curetes and their clashing brass 4.195. They fed the King of heaven in Dicte's cave. 4.196. Alone of all things they receive and hold 4.197. Community of offspring, and they house 4.198. Together in one city, and beneath 4.199. The shelter of majestic laws they live; 4.200. And they alone fixed home and country know 4.201. And in the summer, warned of coming cold 4.202. Make proof of toil, and for the general store 4.203. Hoard up their gathered harvesting. For some 4.204. Watch o'er the victualling of the hive, and these 4.205. By settled order ply their tasks afield; 4.206. And some within the confines of their home 4.207. Plant firm the comb's first layer, Narcissus' tear 4.208. And sticky gum oozed from the bark of trees 4.209. Then set the clinging wax to hang therefrom. 4.315. Or cut the empty wax away? for oft 4.316. Into their comb the newt has gnawed unseen 4.559. With a great cry leapt on him, and ere he rose 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing 4.563. Fire and a fearful beast, and flowing stream. 4.564. But when no trickery found a path for flight 4.565. Baffled at length, to his own shape returned 4.566. With human lips he spake, “Who bade thee, then
23. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.620 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.77 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.77. For troubles and anxieties and feelings of anger and partiality do not accord with bliss, but always imply weakness and fear and dependence upon one's neighbours. Nor, again, must we hold that things which are no more than globular masses of fire, being at the same time endowed with bliss, assume these motions at will. Nay, in every term we use we must hold fast to all the majesty which attaches to such notions as bliss and immortality, lest the terms should generate opinions inconsistent with this majesty. Otherwise such inconsistency will of itself suffice to produce the worst disturbance in our minds. Hence, where we find phenomena invariably recurring, the invariableness of the recurrence must be ascribed to the original interception and conglomeration of atoms whereby the world was formed.
25. Paulinus of Nola, Carmina, 10.19-10.22 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Prudentius, Psychomachia, 35, 34 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

27. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 135, 123

28. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 76

29. Epicurus, Letters, 99-100

30. Epicurus, Letters, 99-100



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
afterlife Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
alexander the great Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
allusion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14
amor, absence of, in the beehive Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
anger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
animal Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
apostle, paul Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
aristotle Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 11
astronomical preface, calendar-builders as duces in Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
astronomy, in anchises creed Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
athens Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
atomism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
atoms, nature/properties of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
beasley, megan Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
bees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
bellum civile (lucan), bougonia, invention of Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 11
bible Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
bion of borysthenes Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 242
body, breast Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
body, head Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
body parts, head Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219
brutus (cicero) Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 11
caesar, julius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 53
callimacheanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
callimachus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
ceres in lucretius, vergil, and ovid Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
children Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
cicero, marcus tullius Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 11
cicero Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 240
city-foundation, hercules and cacus Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
city-foundation, typology Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
cornelius gallus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
cosmogony Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56, 70
cosmos/universe Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52, 53, 56
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
cult statues (idols) Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
definition Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
deification, and journey to the stars motif Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
deification, of augustus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
deification, of caesar Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
deification, of epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
deification, of octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 242
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diogenes of oenoanda Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
egeria Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
empedocleo-lucretian background in metamorphoses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121; Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
empedoclesas archetypal vates in lucretius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 131
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14, 236
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179, 244; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epicurus, authority in the de rerum natura Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 224, 225, 240; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 224, 225, 240
epicurus, theology Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 240; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 240
epicurus/epicurean/epicureanism Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
epicurus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 24, 26, 44, 121, 236, 239, 244; Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
eschatology Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
ethics Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
etna Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
evil Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
evolution Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
faunus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
fear, of the gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52
fear Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 232
finales Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
freedom, freed persons Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
fulvius nobilior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 14
gardens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
gaul Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 53
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
gift Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
gigantomachy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 37; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 121; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 53, 70
grant, r. m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
gratitude Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
hardie, philip Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
hermeneutic, guides Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 236
horace Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
idealistic philosophy, idealism Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
imagery, gigantomachy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
imagery, journey Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 232, 236, 244
imagery, solar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
imagery, triumphal Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 14, 44
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
impietas/impiety/impious Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
infinite Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
information, scarcity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14
invidia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
jerome Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
jupiter, elicius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 179
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179
liber Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
lucretius, devotion to epicurus Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 224, 225, 240
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 121
lucretius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 239
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179, 236, 239
lucretius, theology Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 240
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 232, 236, 239
lucretius Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
makarismos Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 14
materialism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 26
metamorphoses, calliope Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, pierides contest with muses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, typhoeus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
meteorology, clouds Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52, 96
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70, 96
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 44, 179, 239
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
mind Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
moon Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 96
munro, j. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 14
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
narrative Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
natural philosophy, natural philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
nature, natural phenomena, earthquake Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, heaven, sky Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, hurricane Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, moon Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, stars Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, storm, tempest Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, sun Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena, thunder(storm), lightning Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature, natural phenomena Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
nature Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
numa Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 131, 132, 138
oath, vow Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 26, 44, 244
oracular, philosophy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 37
orthodoxy Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
orthopraxy Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
otium Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
ovid, and empedocles Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ovid, remythologizing lucretius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ovid Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
paradox Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
personification, –of disease, tisiphone as personification of the plague in vergil Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
personification allegory Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
personifications Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
phaethon, in ovid Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
philia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
philosophy, epicurean Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
phytocles Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
picus Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
pietas/piety/pious Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
pietas in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 242
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14
plato, and the cave allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
plato Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
poetry, poets Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14, 44, 236, 244
poets, service to empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 239
politics, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
pompey , in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 242
power, of artists and authors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 26, 239
prometheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
provinces Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
prudentius, allegory of Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
prudentius, use of lucretius Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
prudentius, virgilianism of Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
pythagoras Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 131, 132, 138
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52, 53
religio Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 179, 236, 239
religion/religio Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82
religion passim, origin of religion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religion passim, piety Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religion passim, prayer Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religion passim, ritual, rite Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religion passim, theophany, epiphany Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121, 244
republic/republicanism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 52
rome Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
rouse, w. h. d. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
sacrifice Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 138
salvation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
schiesaro, alessandro Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
second coming of christ Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
sedley, david Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 240
senses, touch Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
sight/vision Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 131, 132; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 182
sphragis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
suicide, of empedocles (according to horace) Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
suicide Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 242
superstitio, in lucretius epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
superstition Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 82; Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
swans Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 166
tartarus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
time Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 53, 56
typhoeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 121
underworld Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26
usener, h. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 138
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
vatesempedocles in lucretius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 131
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 26; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 219
violence Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 42
virgil, aeneid, and allegory Hardie, Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry (2019) 196
virgil, and callimachean poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 14
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 26, 44, 244
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 26, 232
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44
voice' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236, 244
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 232, 236, 239
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 232, 244
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 44, 244
war, punic wars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, trojan war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
xenophanes Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
zeno Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56