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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.400-1.409
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.146-1.399, 1.401-1.634, 1.951, 1.958, 1.988-1.1082, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.568, 2.1173-2.1174, 3.1071-3.1072, 5.22-5.51, 5.181-5.186, 5.195-5.234, 5.306-5.317, 5.416-5.508, 5.751-5.770, 5.772-5.1457, 6.1, 6.387-6.422 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Vergil, Georgics, 1.176-1.186, 1.197, 1.199-1.203, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 2.490 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.176. And hem with hounds the mighty forest-glades. 1.177. Soon one with hand-net scourges the broad stream 1.178. Probing its depths, one drags his dripping toil 1.179. Along the main; then iron's unbending might 1.180. And shrieking saw-blade,β€”for the men of old 1.181. With wedges wont to cleave the splintering log;β€” 1.182. Then divers arts arose; toil conquered all 1.183. Remorseless toil, and poverty's shrewd push 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.186. When now the awful groves 'gan fail to bear 1.197. Prune with thy hook the dark field's matted shade 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound
3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.31-10.34, 10.63 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.31. They reject dialectic as superfluous; holding that in their inquiries the physicists should be content to employ the ordinary terms for things. Now in The Canon Epicurus affirms that our sensations and preconceptions and our feelings are the standards of truth; the Epicureans generally make perceptions of mental presentations to be also standards. His own statements are also to be found in the Summary addressed to Herodotus and in the Sovran Maxims. Every sensation, he says, is devoid of reason and incapable of memory; for neither is it self-caused nor, regarded as having an external cause, can it add anything thereto or take anything therefrom. 10.32. Nor is there anything which can refute sensations or convict them of error: one sensation cannot convict another and kindred sensation, for they are equally valid; nor can one sensation refute another which is not kindred but heterogeneous, for the objects which the two senses judge are not the same; nor again can reason refute them, for reason is wholly dependent on sensation; nor can one sense refute another, since we pay equal heed to all. And the reality of separate perceptions guarantees the truth of our senses. But seeing and hearing are just as real as feeling pain. Hence it is from plain facts that we must start when we draw inferences about the unknown. For all our notions are derived from perceptions, either by actual contact or by analogy, or resemblance, or composition, with some slight aid from reasoning. And the objects presented to mad-men and to people in dreams are true, for they produce effects – i.e. movements in the mind – which that which is unreal never does. 10.33. By preconception they mean a sort of apprehension or a right opinion or notion, or universal idea stored in the mind; that is, a recollection of an external object often presented, e.g. Such and such a thing is a man: for no sooner is the word man uttered than we think of his shape by an act of preconception, in which the senses take the lead. Thus the object primarily denoted by every term is then plain and clear. And we should never have started an investigation, unless we had known what it was that we were in search of. For example: The object standing yonder is a horse or a cow. Before making this judgement, we must at some time or other have known by preconception the shape of a horse or a cow. We should not have given anything a name, if we had not first learnt its form by way of preconception. It follows, then, that preconceptions are clear. The object of a judgement is derived from something previously clear, by reference to which we frame the proposition, e.g. How do we know that this is a man? 10.34. Opinion they also call conception or assumption, and declare it to be true and false; for it is true if it is subsequently confirmed or if it is not contradicted by evidence, and false if it is not subsequently confirmed or is contradicted by evidence. Hence the introduction of the phrase, that which awaits confirmation, e.g. to wait and get close to the tower and then learn what it looks like at close quarters.They affirm that there are two states of feeling, pleasure and pain, which arise in every animate being, and that the one is favourable and the other hostile to that being, and by their means choice and avoidance are determined; and that there are two kinds of inquiry, the one concerned with things, the other with nothing but words. So much, then, for his division and criterion in their main outline.But we must return to the letter.Epicurus to Herodotus, greeting. 10.63. Next, keeping in view our perceptions and feelings (for so shall we have the surest grounds for belief), we must recognize generally that the soul is a corporeal thing, composed of fine particles, dispersed all over the frame, most nearly resembling wind with an admixture of heat, in some respects like wind, in others like heat. But, again, there is the third part which exceeds the other two in the fineness of its particles and thereby keeps in closer touch with the rest of the frame. And this is shown by the mental faculties and feelings, by the ease with which the mind moves, and by thoughts, and by all those things the loss of which causes death.
4. Philodemus, De Signis, 23, 13



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 163; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
atomism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
atoms, andoid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
atoms, nature/properties of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 163
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
ethics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
fear, of the gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
hercules Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
hume, david Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 163
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 163
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
memmius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
philodemus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
plague Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 212
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
stoicism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
truth' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82