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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.202
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 134 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

134. Who weakens all the gods and men and stun
2. Homer, Odyssey, 11.305-11.320 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 351 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

351. ἕστηκε κίονʼ οὐρανοῦ τε καὶ χθονὸς
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.53, 2.15, 2.43 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.53. We for our part deem happiness to consist in tranquillity of mind and entire exemption from all duties. For he who taught us all the rest has also taught us that the world was made by nature, without needing an artificer to construct it, and that the act of creation, which according to you cannot be performed without divine skill, is so easy, that nature will create, is creating and has created worlds without number. You on the contrary cannot see how nature can achieve all this without the aid of some intelligence, and so, like the tragic poets, being unable to bring the plot of your drama to a dénouement, you have recourse to a god; 2.15. And the fourth and most potent cause of the belief he said was the uniform motion and revolution of the heavens, and the varied groupings and ordered beauty of the sun, moon and stars, the very sight of which was in itself enough to prove that these things are not the mere effect of chance. When a man goes into a house, a wrestling-school or a public assembly and observes in all that goes on arrangement, regularity and system, he cannot possibly suppose that these things come about without a cause: he realizes that there is someone who presides and controls. Far more therefore with the vast movements and phases of the heavenly bodies, and these ordered processes of a multitude of enormous masses of matter, which throughout the countless ages of the infinite past have never in the smallest degree played false, is he compelled to infer that these mighty world-motions are regulated by some Mind. 2.43. moreover the substance employed as food is also believed to have some influence on mental acuteness; it is therefore likely that the stars possess surpassing intelligence, since they inhabit the ethereal region of the world and also are nourished by the moist vapours of sea and earth, rarefied in their passage through the wide intervening space. Again, the consciousness and intelligence of the stars is most clearly evinced by their order and regularity; for regular and rhythmical motion is impossible without design, which contains no trace of casual or accidental variation; now the order and eternal regularity of the constellations indicates neither a process of nature, for it is highly rational, nor chance, for chance loves variation and abhors regularity; it follows therefore that the stars move of their own free-will and because of their intelligence and divinity.
5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.20, 1.62-1.79, 1.103, 1.107, 1.117-1.119, 1.124, 1.129, 1.146-1.201, 1.203-1.216, 1.224, 1.227-1.231, 1.249-1.397, 1.418-1.634, 1.638, 1.741, 1.856, 1.926-1.927, 1.955, 1.992, 1.999, 1.1021-1.1028, 1.1082, 2.75-2.79, 2.184-2.293, 2.302, 2.333-2.380, 2.443, 2.478-2.568, 2.573, 2.605, 2.700-2.729, 2.991-2.1022, 2.1042-2.1043, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1116-2.1117, 2.1129-2.1130, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.3, 3.17, 3.27, 3.31-3.33, 3.37-3.101, 3.105, 3.110, 3.116-3.120, 3.128-3.129, 3.416, 3.670-3.678, 3.746-3.747, 3.945, 3.948, 3.978-3.1023, 3.1078, 4.26-4.28, 4.138-4.139, 4.481, 4.488-4.495, 4.1107, 4.1119, 4.1209-4.1232, 4.1269-4.1273, 4.1285, 5.43-5.51, 5.82, 5.84, 5.88-5.90, 5.186, 5.194, 5.206-5.217, 5.310, 5.343, 5.419-5.431, 5.665, 5.677-5.679, 5.727-5.750, 5.791-5.792, 5.826-5.836, 5.878-5.926, 5.1058, 5.1104, 5.1213, 5.1233-5.1235, 5.1271, 5.1321, 5.1345, 5.1361-5.1378, 5.1430-5.1433, 5.1436-5.1439, 5.1444, 5.1457, 6.25, 6.32, 6.58-6.66, 6.708, 6.906-6.907, 6.1182-6.1183 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Juvenal, Satires, 7.197-7.198 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.111 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.139 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.139. [A blessed and eternal being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; hence he is exempt from movements of anger and partiality, for every such movement implies weakness [Elsewhere he says that the gods are discernible by reason alone, some being numerically distinct, while others result uniformly from the continuous influx of similar images directed to the same spot and in human form.]Death is nothing to us; for the body, when it has been resolved into its elements, has no feeling, and that which has no feeling is nothing to us.The magnitude of pleasure reaches its limit in the removal of all pain. When pleasure is present, so long as it is uninterrupted, there is no pain either of body or of mind or of both together.
9. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 77

10. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 115

11. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 115

12. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.23, 1.39, 1.50-1.52, 1.60-1.63, 1.100, 1.118-1.148, 1.150-1.159, 1.161-1.166, 1.184-1.185, 1.197-1.203, 1.276-1.283, 1.316-1.334, 1.351, 1.353, 1.415-1.423, 1.439, 1.446-1.447, 1.463-1.514, 2.10-2.21, 2.28-2.31, 2.54-2.56, 2.63-2.64, 2.70, 2.76, 2.78, 2.82, 2.136-2.176, 3.3-3.8, 3.95-3.100, 3.115-3.117, 3.232, 3.236, 3.258-3.263, 3.266-3.268, 3.270-3.271, 4.149-4.152, 4.170-4.175, 4.560-4.562

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.6. Such are my themes. O universal light 1.7. Most glorious! ye that lead the gliding year 1.8. Along the sky, Liber and Ceres mild 1.9. If by your bounty holpen earth once changed 1.10. Chaonian acorn for the plump wheat-ear 1.11. And mingled with the grape, your new-found gift 1.12. The draughts of Achelous; and ye Faun 1.13. To rustics ever kind, come foot it, Faun 1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.16. Sprang from earth's womb at thy great trident's stroke 1.17. Neptune; and haunter of the groves, for whom 1.18. Three hundred snow-white heifers browse the brakes 1.19. The fertile brakes of placeName key= 1.20. Thy native forest and Lycean lawns 1.21. Pan, shepherd-god, forsaking, as the love 1.22. of thine own Maenalus constrains thee, hear 1.23. And help, O lord of placeName key= 1.39. Sole dread of seamen, till far placeName key= 1.50. Elysium's fields, and Proserpine not heed 1.51. Her mother's voice entreating to return— 1.52. Vouchsafe a prosperous voyage, and smile on thi 1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.62. Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt; 1.63. Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop 1.100. With refuse rich to soak the thirsty soil 1.118. Hales o'er them; from the far Olympian height 1.119. Him golden Ceres not in vain regards; 1.120. And he, who having ploughed the fallow plain 1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.147. But no whit the more 1.148. For all expedients tried and travail borne 1.150. Do greedy goose and Strymon-haunting crane 1.151. And succory's bitter fibres cease to harm 1.152. Or shade not injure. The great Sire himself 1.153. No easy road to husbandry assigned 1.154. And first was he by human skill to rouse 1.155. The slumbering glebe, whetting the minds of men 1.156. With care on care, nor suffering realm of hi 1.157. In drowsy sloth to stagnate. Before Jove 1.158. Fields knew no taming hand of husbandmen; 1.159. To mark the plain or mete with boundary-line— 1.161. They gathered, and the earth of her own will 1.162. All things more freely, no man bidding, bore. 1.163. He to black serpents gave their venom-bane 1.164. And bade the wolf go prowl, and ocean toss; 1.165. Shooed from the leaves their honey, put fire away 1.166. And curbed the random rivers running wine 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.197. Prune with thy hook the dark field's matted shade 1.198. Pray down the showers, all vainly thou shalt eye 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.276. Opens the year, before whose threatening front 1.277. Routed the dog-star sinks. But if it be 1.278. For wheaten harvest and the hardy spelt 1.279. Thou tax the soil, to corn-ears wholly given 1.280. Let Atlas' daughters hide them in the dawn 1.281. The Cretan star, a crown of fire, depart 1.282. Or e'er the furrow's claim of seed thou quit 1.283. Or haste thee to entrust the whole year's hope 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.415. Wields with red hand the levin; through all her bulk 1.416. Earth at the hurly quakes; the beasts are fled 1.417. And mortal hearts of every kindred sunk 1.418. In cowering terror; he with flaming brand 1.419. Athos , or Rhodope, or Ceraunian crag 1.420. Precipitates: then doubly raves the South 1.421. With shower on blinding shower, and woods and coast 1.422. Wail fitfully beneath the mighty blast. 1.423. This fearing, mark the months and Signs of heaven 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come 1.446. That bring the frost, the Sire of all himself 1.447. Ordained what warnings in her monthly round 1.463. oft, too, when wind is toward, the stars thou'lt see 1.464. From heaven shoot headlong, and through murky night 1.465. Long trails of fire white-glistening in their wake 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.467. Or feathers on the wave-top float and play. 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.469. It lightens, and when thunder fills the hall 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.474. Or, as it rises, the high-soaring crane 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.476. Upturned to heaven, the heifer snuffs the gale 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.484. Clamour with jostling wings. Now mayst thou see 1.485. The various ocean-fowl and those that pry 1.486. Round Asian meads within thy fresher-pools 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry 1.488. About their shoulders dash the plenteous spray 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 1.490. Into the billows, for sheer idle joy 1.491. of their mad bathing-revel. Then the crow 1.492. With full voice, good-for-naught, inviting rain 1.493. Stalks on the dry sand mateless and alone. 1.494. Nor e'en the maids, that card their nightly task 1.495. Know not the storm-sign, when in blazing crock 1.496. They see the lamp-oil sputtering with a growth 1.497. of mouldy snuff-clots. 1.498. So too, after rain 1.499. Sunshine and open skies thou mayst forecast 1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed 1.501. Appear the stars' keen edges, nor the moon 1.502. As borrowing of her brother's beams to rise 1.503. Nor fleecy films to float along the sky. 1.504. Not to the sun's warmth then upon the shore 1.505. Do halcyons dear to Thetis ope their wings 1.506. Nor filthy swine take thought to toss on high 1.507. With scattering snout the straw-wisps. But the cloud 1.508. Seek more the vales, and rest upon the plain 1.509. And from the roof-top the night-owl for naught 1.510. Watching the sunset plies her 'lated song. 1.511. Distinct in clearest air is Nisus seen 1.512. Towering, and Scylla for the purple lock 1.513. Pays dear; for whereso, as she flies, her wing 1.514. The light air winnow, lo! fierce, implacable 2.10. And stripped of buskin stain thy bared limb 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.12. First, nature's law 2.13. For generating trees is manifold; 2.14. For some of their own force spontaneous spring 2.15. No hand of man compelling, and posse 2.16. The plains and river-windings far and wide 2.17. As pliant osier and the bending broom 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.28. Nature imparted first; hence all the race 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.30. Springs into verdure. Other means there are 2.31. Which use by method for itself acquired. 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.232. Weak, tottering-limbed, and ignorant of life. 3.236. Alternately to curve each bending leg 3.258. Whether on steed or steer thy choice be set. 3.259. Ay, therefore 'tis they banish bulls afar 3.260. To solitary pastures, or behind 3.261. Some mountain-barrier, or broad streams beyond 3.262. Or else in plenteous stalls pen fast at home. 3.263. For, even through sight of her, the female waste 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.270. Wound follows wound; the black blood laves their limbs; 3.271. Horns push and strive against opposing horns 4.149. Makes the trim garden smile; of placeName key= 4.150. Whose roses bloom and fade and bloom again; 4.151. How endives glory in the streams they drink 4.152. And green banks in their parsley, and how the gourd 4.170. With unbought plenty heaped his board on high. 4.171. He was the first to cull the rose in spring 4.172. He the ripe fruits in autumn; and ere yet 4.173. Winter had ceased in sullen ire to rive 4.174. The rocks with frost, and with her icy bit 4.175. Curb in the running waters, there was he 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academics,the academy Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
adynata Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140, 204, 205, 220
aetiology Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 206
aetna Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
allegory Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
allusion/allusiveness Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
amor,and metamorphosis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
amor,as destructive force Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
amor,in georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
animal sacrifice,eschatology Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
animals,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 204, 206
animals Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140, 176, 220
animus,in lucretiuss epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
anthropomorphism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
aratus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205
aristotle Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
arnobius,concept of salvation Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
ataraxia Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 203
atomism,atomists Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
atomism Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
atoms,swerve of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
bailey,c. Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
bodies,body Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
body-environment approach (bea),in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
body (human),and knowledge acquisition/cognition Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
cattle Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
causation,cause Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
cereal crops Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
chance Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
cognition Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
cultivation Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
de lacy,p. Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
determinism Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
deucalion Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205
earth Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
emotion Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
ennius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
epicurus,atomism of Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
epicurus,concept of death Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
epicurus,on nature and the self Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
epicurus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
epistle to menoeceus' Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
eudoxus Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
finales,book 1 Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
giants Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140, 204, 220
gigantomachy/giants Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244, 245
god Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
gods,in the aeneid Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
gods,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 206, 207
golden age Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 206, 207
growth,spontaneous (wild) Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244, 245
hero Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
hesiod,allusions to Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 207
hesiod Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205
heuretai Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
homer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 236
horses Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 176
imagery,agricultural Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
imagery,fire Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 176
imagery,gigantomachy Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
imagery,military Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
indeterminacy Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
julius caesar Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
jupiter Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244, 245; Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 206, 207
labor,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 176, 206
labor Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
laudes italiae Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 209
leander Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
limit,epicurean concept of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
lucretius,agriculture in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 206, 209
lucretius,animals in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 204, 206
lucretius,culture-history in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 204
lucretius,laws of nature in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 220
lucretius,mirabilia in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
lucretius,myth in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
lucretius,natura in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 204, 236
lucretius,religion in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 236
lucretius,war in Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
lucretius Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174; Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
matter Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
metamorphosis Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140
mind,in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
mind Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
mirabilia,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
mirabilia,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
monsters Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140, 204, 209
myth,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
myth,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124, 140, 205, 206
natura Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 204, 209, 236
nature,laws of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
nature Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
oak Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244, 245
order Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
perception,lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
personification Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 207
physical elements Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
plato Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 203; Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 147
poetry and poetics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
portents Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
prayer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
proems,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
providentialism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205, 206
religion,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140, 236
religion,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 206, 207
reproduction,epicurean theory of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
robin,l. Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
saturn Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
seeds,in epicurean physics Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 174
senses,in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
senses,lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 54
servius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
simile Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244
similes Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 140
solmsen,f. Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158, 174
stoicism,stoics,cosmology of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
stoicism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 203
sun Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
techne,teleology Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 158
thomas,r. f. Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 207
titans Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
trees Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176, 204, 209, 220
typhoeus Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 244
underworld Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
venus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 176
vine Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 245
virgil,and aratus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205
virgil,and hesiod Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 205
virgil,reception of lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 124
war,and poetry Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
war,in lucretius Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 236
weather signs Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 206, 207