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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.146-1.214
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seminis ad coitum, si e nilo crescere possent;Nor on the mingling of the living seeds Would space be needed for the growth of things Were life an increment of nothing: then The tiny babe forthwith would walk a man, And from the turf would leap a branching tree- Wonders unheard of; for, by Nature, each Slowly increases from its lawful seed, And through that increase shall conserve its kind. Whence take the proof that things enlarge and feed From out their proper matter. Thus it comes That earth, without her seasons of fixed rains, Could bear no produce such as makes us glad, And whatsoever lives, if shut from food, Prolongs its kind and guards its life no more. Thus easier 'tis to hold that many things Have primal bodies in common (as we see The single letters common to many words) Than aught exists without its origins. Moreover, why should Nature not prepare Men of a bulk to ford the seas afoot, Or rend the mighty mountains with their hands, Or conquer Time with length of days, if not Because for all begotten things abides The changeless stuff, and what from that may spring Is fixed forevermore? Lastly we see How far the tilled surpass the fields untilled And to the labour of our hands return Their more abounding crops; there are indeed Within the earth primordial germs of things, Which, as the ploughshare turns the fruitful clods And kneads the mould, we quicken into birth. Else would ye mark, without all toil of ours, Spontaneous generations, fairer forms.
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nil igitur fieri de nilo posse fatendumstConfess then, naught from nothing can become, Since all must have their seeds, wherefrom to grow, Wherefrom to reach the gentle fields of air. Hence too it comes that Nature all dissolves Into their primal bodies again, and naught Perishes ever to annihilation. For, were aught mortal in its every part, Before our eyes it might be snatched away Unto destruction; since no force were needed To sunder its members and undo its bands. Whereas, of truth, because all things exist, With seed imperishable, Nature allows Destruction nor collapse of aught, until Some outward force may shatter by a blow, Or inward craft, entering its hollow cells, Dissolve it down. And more than this, if Time, That wastes with eld the works along the world, Destroy entire, consuming matter all, Whence then may Venus back to light of life Restore the generations kind by kind? Or how, when thus restored, may daedal EarthFoster and plenish with her ancient food, Which, kind by kind, she offers unto each? Whence may the water-springs, beneath the sea, Or inland rivers, far and wide away, Keep the unfathomable ocean full? And out of what does Ether feed the stars? For lapsed years and infinite age must else Have eat all shapes of mortal stock away: But be it the Long Ago contained those germs, By which this sum of things recruited lives, Those same infallibly can never die, Nor nothing to nothing evermore return.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

274. καθʼ Ἑλλάδʼ ἔσται. δύο γάρ, ὦ νεανία
2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.142-1.145, 1.147-1.634, 1.951, 1.958, 1.988-1.1051, 1.1114-1.1117, 2.55-2.61, 2.184-2.293, 2.522-2.568, 2.700-2.729, 3.37, 3.59-3.64, 3.82, 3.87-3.135, 3.1060-3.1074, 5.22-5.51, 5.82, 5.88-5.90, 5.181-5.186, 5.218-5.221, 5.751-5.770, 5.1430-5.1433, 6.35-6.41, 6.58-6.78, 6.86, 6.90-6.91, 6.387-6.422 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.6.19 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Juvenal, Satires, 1.4-1.5, 1.127-1.128, 3.236-3.261, 3.305-3.308 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.31-10.34, 10.63 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.31. They reject dialectic as superfluous; holding that in their inquiries the physicists should be content to employ the ordinary terms for things. Now in The Canon Epicurus affirms that our sensations and preconceptions and our feelings are the standards of truth; the Epicureans generally make perceptions of mental presentations to be also standards. His own statements are also to be found in the Summary addressed to Herodotus and in the Sovran Maxims. Every sensation, he says, is devoid of reason and incapable of memory; for neither is it self-caused nor, regarded as having an external cause, can it add anything thereto or take anything therefrom. 10.32. Nor is there anything which can refute sensations or convict them of error: one sensation cannot convict another and kindred sensation, for they are equally valid; nor can one sensation refute another which is not kindred but heterogeneous, for the objects which the two senses judge are not the same; nor again can reason refute them, for reason is wholly dependent on sensation; nor can one sense refute another, since we pay equal heed to all. And the reality of separate perceptions guarantees the truth of our senses. But seeing and hearing are just as real as feeling pain. Hence it is from plain facts that we must start when we draw inferences about the unknown. For all our notions are derived from perceptions, either by actual contact or by analogy, or resemblance, or composition, with some slight aid from reasoning. And the objects presented to mad-men and to people in dreams are true, for they produce effects – i.e. movements in the mind – which that which is unreal never does. 10.33. By preconception they mean a sort of apprehension or a right opinion or notion, or universal idea stored in the mind; that is, a recollection of an external object often presented, e.g. Such and such a thing is a man: for no sooner is the word man uttered than we think of his shape by an act of preconception, in which the senses take the lead. Thus the object primarily denoted by every term is then plain and clear. And we should never have started an investigation, unless we had known what it was that we were in search of. For example: The object standing yonder is a horse or a cow. Before making this judgement, we must at some time or other have known by preconception the shape of a horse or a cow. We should not have given anything a name, if we had not first learnt its form by way of preconception. It follows, then, that preconceptions are clear. The object of a judgement is derived from something previously clear, by reference to which we frame the proposition, e.g. How do we know that this is a man? 10.34. Opinion they also call conception or assumption, and declare it to be true and false; for it is true if it is subsequently confirmed or if it is not contradicted by evidence, and false if it is not subsequently confirmed or is contradicted by evidence. Hence the introduction of the phrase, that which awaits confirmation, e.g. to wait and get close to the tower and then learn what it looks like at close quarters.They affirm that there are two states of feeling, pleasure and pain, which arise in every animate being, and that the one is favourable and the other hostile to that being, and by their means choice and avoidance are determined; and that there are two kinds of inquiry, the one concerned with things, the other with nothing but words. So much, then, for his division and criterion in their main outline.But we must return to the letter.Epicurus to Herodotus, greeting. 10.63. Next, keeping in view our perceptions and feelings (for so shall we have the surest grounds for belief), we must recognize generally that the soul is a corporeal thing, composed of fine particles, dispersed all over the frame, most nearly resembling wind with an admixture of heat, in some respects like wind, in others like heat. But, again, there is the third part which exceeds the other two in the fineness of its particles and thereby keeps in closer touch with the rest of the frame. And this is shown by the mental faculties and feelings, by the ease with which the mind moves, and by thoughts, and by all those things the loss of which causes death.
6. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 35

7. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.254-4.256, 4.301-4.302, 4.371, 4.375, 4.378-4.379, 4.408, 4.436-4.438

8. Philodemus, De Signis, 23, 13



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allegory Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
animus, in lucretiuss epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
assimilation to god Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
astronomica (manilius), (deteriorating) teacher / student relationship in Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
astronomica (manilius), and aratus Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
astronomica (manilius), and lucretius Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
astronomica (manilius), stoicism in Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
atomism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
atoms, andoid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
atoms, nature/properties of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
body-environment approach (bea), in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
body (human), and knowledge acquisition/cognition Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
braund, susanna morton Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
cognition Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
dining, horace Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
emotion Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
epictetus Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
forum, in horace and other satirists Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71, 72
hercules Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
hume, david Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
juvenal Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
labor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
lucilius Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
lucretius, labor in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
lucretius Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
lucubration, for writing and study Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
manilius (marcus manilius) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
mind, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
phaenomena (aratus) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 42
philodemus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
prodicus Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
salutatio, avoidance and critique Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
satire Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 186
senses, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 54
soul, part, mortal/immortal Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
stoicism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
teleology Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
theia Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 171
truth' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 72
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 71
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 148