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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.124-1.126
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27 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 19.362-19.363, 22.262-22.266, 23.62-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19.362. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle. 19.363. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle. 22.262. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto him Achilles, swift of foot:Hector, talk not to me, thou madman, of covets. As between lions and men there are no oaths of faith, nor do wolves and lambs have hearts of concord but are evil-minded continually one against the other 22.263. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto him Achilles, swift of foot:Hector, talk not to me, thou madman, of covets. As between lions and men there are no oaths of faith, nor do wolves and lambs have hearts of concord but are evil-minded continually one against the other 22.264. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto him Achilles, swift of foot:Hector, talk not to me, thou madman, of covets. As between lions and men there are no oaths of faith, nor do wolves and lambs have hearts of concord but are evil-minded continually one against the other 22.265. /even so is it not possible for thee and me to be friends, neither shall there be oaths between us till one or the other shall have fallen, and glutted with his blood Ares, the warrior with tough shield of hide. Bethink thee of all manner of valour: now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior. No more is there any escape for thee, but forthwith shall Pallas Athene 22.266. /even so is it not possible for thee and me to be friends, neither shall there be oaths between us till one or the other shall have fallen, and glutted with his blood Ares, the warrior with tough shield of hide. Bethink thee of all manner of valour: now in good sooth it behoveth thee to quit thee as a spearman and a dauntless warrior. No more is there any escape for thee, but forthwith shall Pallas Athene 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
2. Cicero, Pro Archia, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

24. quam multos scriptores rerum suarum magnus ille Alexander secum habuisse dicitur! atque is tamen, cum in Sigeo ad Achillis tumulum astitisset: 'o fortunate,' inquit, 'adulescens, qui tuae virtutis Homerum praeconem inveneris inveneris eb χ c : inveneras (-nisti k ) cett. !' et vere. nam, nisi Ilias Ilias Naugerius (2): illi (illa a : om. E ) ars codd. illa exstitisset, idem tumulus qui corpus eius contexerat nomen etiam obruisset. quid ? noster hic Magnus qui cum virtute fortunam adaequavit, nonne Theophanem Mytilenaeum, scriptorem rerum suarum, in contione militum civitate donavit, et nostri illi fortes viri, sed rustici ac milites, dulcedine quadam gloriae commoti quasi participes eiusdem laudis magno illud clamore approbaverunt?
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 40.1-40.7, 41.1-41.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

40.1. Much labor was created for every man,and a heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam,from the day they come forth from their mothers womb till the day they return to the mother of all. 40.1. All these were created for the wicked,and on their account the flood came. 40.2. Their perplexities and fear of heart -- their anxious thought is the day of death 40.2. Wine and music gladden the heart,but the love of wisdom is better than both. 40.3. from the man who sits on a splendid throne to the one who is humbled in dust and ashes 40.3. In the mouth of the shameless begging is sweet,but in his stomach a fire is kindled. 40.4. from the man who wears purple and a crown to the one who is clothed in burlap; 40.5. there is anger and envy and trouble and unrest,and fear of death, and fury and strife. And when one rests upon his bed,his sleep at night confuses his mind. 40.6. He gets little or no rest,and afterward in his sleep, as though he were on watch,he is troubled by the visions of his mind like one who has escaped from the battle-front; 40.7. at the moment of his rescue he wakes up,and wonders that his fear came to nothing. 41.1. O death, how bitter is the reminder of you to one who lives at peace among his possessions,to a man without distractions, who is prosperous in everything,and who still has the vigor to enjoy his food! 41.1. Whatever is from the dust returns to dust;so the ungodly go from curse to destruction. 41.2. and of silence, before those who greet you;of looking at a woman who is a harlot 41.4. and how can you reject the good pleasure of the Most High?Whether life is for ten or a hundred or a thousand years,there is no inquiry about it in Hades.
5. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 2.23-2.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.23. for God created man for incorruption,and made him in the image of his own eternity 2.24. but through the devils envy death entered the world,and those who belong to his party experience it.
6. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Horace, Odes, 3.30.10-3.30.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Horace, Letters, 1.19.23-1.19.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.123, 1.125-1.145, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.202, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.264, 1.328, 1.370-1.371, 1.442, 1.471-1.482, 1.486, 1.505, 1.586, 1.593, 1.624, 1.634-1.920, 1.926-1.927, 1.955, 1.968-1.983, 1.992, 1.999, 1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.45-2.46, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.242, 2.302, 2.325-2.327, 2.569-2.580, 2.605, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.3, 3.17, 3.27, 3.416-3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.523-3.525, 3.670-3.783, 3.830-3.1094, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.481, 4.488, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 4.1119, 4.1210, 4.1285, 5.1-5.54, 5.84, 5.99, 5.109, 5.194, 5.235-5.508, 5.727-5.730, 5.735, 5.783-5.1457, 6.1-6.6, 6.32, 6.60, 6.708, 6.906-6.907, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.308-5.309, 5.341-5.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Propertius, Elegies, 3.1.1-3.1.4, 4.7 (1st cent. BCE

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.268-2.297, 4.384-4.391, 4.615-4.629, 6.662-6.668, 6.679-6.683, 7.413-7.472, 8.36-8.65 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.272. our doubt dispelled. His stratagems and tears 2.273. wrought victory where neither Tydeus' son 2.274. nor mountain-bred Achilles could prevail 2.275. nor ten years' war, nor fleets a thousand strong. 2.276. But now a vaster spectacle of fear 2.277. burst over us, to vex our startled souls. 2.279. priest unto Neptune, was in act to slay 2.281. Lo! o'er the tranquil deep from Tenedos 2.289. their monstrous backs wound forward fold on fold. 2.290. Soon they made land; the furious bright eyes 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.293. All terror-pale we fled. Unswerving then 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.296. each dragon coiled, and on the shrinking flesh 4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.615. betwixt the twain the sorrowing sister bore. 4.616. But no words move, no lamentations bring 4.617. persuasion to his soul; decrees of Fate 4.618. oppose, and some wise god obstructs the way 4.619. that finds the hero's ear. oft-times around 4.620. the aged strength of some stupendous oak 4.621. the rival blasts of wintry Alpine winds 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 6.662. The shades of thy Deiphobus received. 6.663. My fate it was, and Helen's murderous wrong 6.664. Wrought me this woe; of her these tokens tell. 6.665. For how that last night in false hope we passed 6.666. Thou knowest,—ah, too well we both recall! 6.667. When up the steep of Troy the fateful horse 6.668. Came climbing, pregt with fierce men-at-arms 6.679. Then loud on Menelaus did she call 6.680. And with her own false hand unbarred the door; 6.681. Such gift to her fond lord she fain would send 6.682. To blot the memory of his ancient wrong! 6.683. Why tell the tale, how on my couch they broke 7.413. thy virgin dower, and Bellona's blaze 7.414. light thee the bridal bed! Not only teemed 7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea 7.467. in gentle accents such as mothers use; 7.468. and many a tear she shed, about her child 7.469. her darling, destined for a Phrygian's bride: 7.470. “O father! can we give Lavinia's hand 7.471. to Trojan fugitives? why wilt thou show 7.472. no mercy on thy daughter, nor thyself; 8.36. all shapes of beast or bird, the wide world o'er 8.37. lay deep in slumber. So beneath the arch 8.38. of a cold sky Aeneas laid him down 8.39. upon the river-bank, his heart sore tried 8.40. by so much war and sorrow, and gave o'er 8.41. his body to its Iong-delayed repose. 8.42. There, 'twixt the poplars by the gentle stream 8.43. the River-Father, genius of that place 8.44. old Tiberinus visibly uprose; 8.45. a cloak of gray-green lawn he wore, his hair 8.46. o'erhung with wreath of reeds. In soothing words 8.48. “Seed of the gods! who bringest to my shore 8.49. thy Trojan city wrested from her foe 8.50. a stronghold everlasting, Latium 's plain 8.51. and fair Laurentum long have looked for thee. 8.52. Here truly is thy home. Turn not away. 8.53. Here the true guardians of thy hearth shall be. 8.54. Fear not the gathering war. The wrath of Heaven 8.55. has stilled its swollen wave. A sign I tell: 8.56. Lest thou shouldst deem this message of thy sleep 8.57. a vain, deluding dream, thou soon shalt find 8.58. in the oak-copses on my margent green 8.59. a huge sow, with her newly-littered brood 8.60. of thirty young; along the ground she lies 8.61. now-white, and round her udders her white young. 8.62. There shall thy city stand, and there thy toil 8.63. hall find untroubled rest. After the lapse 8.64. of thrice ten rolling years, Ascanius 8.65. hall found a city there of noble name
13. Vergil, Eclogues, 6.1-6.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.2. to Syracusan strains, nor blushed within
14. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.5, 1.41-1.42, 2.176, 3.10-3.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust
15. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 2.6 (1st cent. CE

16. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.27.7, 4.7.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.183-1.205, 1.224 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. New Testament, Acts, 26.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26.18. to open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive remission of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in me.'
19. New Testament, Colossians, 1.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.13. who delivered us out of the power of darkness, and translated us into the Kingdom of the Son of his love;
20. New Testament, Ephesians, 2.2, 6.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. in which you once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the powers of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience; 6.12. For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world's rulers of the darkness of this age, and against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.
21. New Testament, Hebrews, 2.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.15. and might deliver all of them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.
22. New Testament, John, 12.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.31. Now is the judgment of this world. Now the prince of this world will be cast out.
23. Silius Italicus, Punica, 7.121-7.122, 12.394, 12.408-12.413, 13.791 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 23, 33, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 11.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Tertullian, Apology, 2.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Anon., Pirqe Rabbi Eliezer, 13



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acheron, river Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289
acheron Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
allecto Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
anchises Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
anchoring allusions Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
anger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
animal sacrifice, epistemology Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
animal sacrifice, eschatology' Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
apollo Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
arnobius, concept of salvation Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atonement, as defeat of the devil nan
atonement, as means of deliverance from death nan
beasley, megan Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27, 270
caesar, julius, at the rubicon Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
callimachus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
castor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
ceres in lucretius, vergil, and ovid Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
cicero Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
cornelius gallus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
croesus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
cult of the dead, roman Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
cynthia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
cyprian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
decemuiri Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289
dido Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diogenes of oenoanda Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269, 270
elysium Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
empedocleo-lucretian background in metamorphoses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
empedocles Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ennius, alignment with / adaptation of homer Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27, 269, 270; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
epicureanism, theories of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
epicurus/epicureanism, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 236; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
eschatology, eschatological Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 3
eschatology, of stoicism Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
eurydice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
fate Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28, 84
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
fear, of the gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
fear Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
ghost Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
ghosts Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269, 270
gigantomachy Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
hades Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
hamilcar, father of hannibal Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290
hannibal Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
hector Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
helicon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289
hesiod Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
hesperia, as evocative term in the ph. Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 50
homer, aligned with ennius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 50
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 236; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27, 270; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
intertextuality Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
jewish eschatology and apocalyptic literature Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
knowledge, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lactantius Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50; Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86, 168
materialism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
metamorphoses, calliope Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, pierides contest with muses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, typhoeus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
oracular, philosophy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28
orpheus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
ovid, and empedocles Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ovid, remythologizing lucretius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
patroclus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
philodemus, and parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
piraeus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
propertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
prophecy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
pythagoras, and numa Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 180
pythagoras, had beans for relatives Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 180
pythagoreans, pythagoreanism, pythagorizing Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 3, 28, 84
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
reason Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
reincarnation/transmigration Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
roma, as a character Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
rubicon Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
scipio africanus, and achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
scipio africanus, katabasis of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, meeting with homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, meeting with virtus and voluptas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
senses, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, in the roman cult of the death Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
servius, as reader Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 50
sibyl Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, and cicero Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290, 312
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
silius italicus, and the tradition on kingship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 312
silius italicus, and virgil Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312
simulacra Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269
soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28, 84
stoicism, eschatology of Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
tertullian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
underworld Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291, 312; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 269, 270
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil, as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 49, 50
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
xenophanes Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70