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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.117-1.126
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

37 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Homer, Iliad, 19.362-19.363 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19.362. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle. 19.363. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle.
3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Pro Archia, 24, 22 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

22. carus fuit Africano superiori noster Ennius, itaque etiam in sepulcro Scipionum putatur is esse constitutus ex marmore. at eis ex marmore. At iis Fascitellus : et marmoratis codd. : ex marmore; cuius Mommsen laudibus certe non solum ipse qui laudatur ipse ... laudatur GEeab2 : ipsi ... laudantur (-atur p ) cett. sed etiam populi Romani nomen ornatur. in caelum huius proavus Cato tollitur; magnus honos populi Romani rebus adiungitur. omnes denique illi maximi, Marcelli, Fulvii non sine communi omnium nostrum laude decorantur. ergo illum qui haec fecerat, Rudinum Rudinum Schol., A. Augustinus : rudem tum (tu Ee : tamen ς gp ς ) codd. hominem, maiores nostri in civitatem receperunt; nos hunc Heracliensem multis a multis Lambinus civitatibus expetitum, in hac autem legibus constitutum de nostra civitate eiciamus eiciamus G : eiecimus e : eiciemus cett. ?
7. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 40.1-40.7, 41.1-41.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

40.1. Much labor was created for every man,and a heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam,from the day they come forth from their mothers womb till the day they return to the mother of all. 40.1. All these were created for the wicked,and on their account the flood came. 40.2. Their perplexities and fear of heart -- their anxious thought is the day of death 40.2. Wine and music gladden the heart,but the love of wisdom is better than both. 40.3. from the man who sits on a splendid throne to the one who is humbled in dust and ashes 40.3. In the mouth of the shameless begging is sweet,but in his stomach a fire is kindled. 40.4. from the man who wears purple and a crown to the one who is clothed in burlap; 40.5. there is anger and envy and trouble and unrest,and fear of death, and fury and strife. And when one rests upon his bed,his sleep at night confuses his mind. 40.6. He gets little or no rest,and afterward in his sleep, as though he were on watch,he is troubled by the visions of his mind like one who has escaped from the battle-front; 40.7. at the moment of his rescue he wakes up,and wonders that his fear came to nothing. 41.1. O death, how bitter is the reminder of you to one who lives at peace among his possessions,to a man without distractions, who is prosperous in everything,and who still has the vigor to enjoy his food! 41.1. Whatever is from the dust returns to dust;so the ungodly go from curse to destruction. 41.2. and of silence, before those who greet you;of looking at a woman who is a harlot 41.4. and how can you reject the good pleasure of the Most High?Whether life is for ten or a hundred or a thousand years,there is no inquiry about it in Hades.
9. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 2.23-2.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.23. for God created man for incorruption,and made him in the image of his own eternity 2.24. but through the devils envy death entered the world,and those who belong to his party experience it.
10. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 34.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Horace, Odes, 3.30.10-3.30.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Horace, Letters, 1.14, 1.14.4, 1.19.23-1.19.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. Upon the whole, a man that will peruse this history, may principally learn from it, that all events succeed well, even to an incredible degree, and the reward of felicity is proposed by God; but then it is to those that follow his will, and do not venture to break his excellent laws: and that so far as men any way apostatize from the accurate observation of them, what was practicable before becomes impracticable; and whatsoever they set about as a good thing is converted into an incurable calamity. 1.14. 3. Noah, when, after the deluge, the earth was resettled in its former condition, set about its cultivation; and when he had planted it with vines, and when the fruit was ripe, and he had gathered the grapes in their season, and the wine was ready for use, he offered sacrifice, and feasted
14. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.116, 1.118-1.145, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.202, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.264, 1.328, 1.370-1.371, 1.442, 1.471-1.482, 1.486, 1.505, 1.586, 1.593, 1.624, 1.634-1.920, 1.923, 1.926-1.950, 1.955, 1.968-1.983, 1.992, 1.999, 1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.7-2.10, 2.45-2.46, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.242, 2.302, 2.325-2.327, 2.569-2.580, 2.600-2.660, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.3, 3.17, 3.23-3.24, 3.27, 3.416-3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.523-3.525, 3.670-3.783, 3.830-3.1094, 4.1-4.5, 4.11-4.25, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.481, 4.488, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 4.1119, 4.1210, 4.1285, 5.1-5.54, 5.84, 5.99, 5.109-5.155, 5.165-5.168, 5.181-5.186, 5.194-5.508, 5.727-5.730, 5.735, 5.783-5.1457, 6.1-6.6, 6.32, 6.60, 6.150-6.155, 6.708, 6.786-6.787, 6.906-6.907, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.19-1.15.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.308-5.309, 5.341-5.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Propertius, Elegies, 3.1.1-3.1.4, 3.3.6, 4.7 (1st cent. BCE

18. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.263-1.266, 5.734, 6.638, 7.30, 8.184-8.275 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 5.734. Next Atys rode, young Atys, sire to be 7.30. their sails with winds of power, and sped them on 8.184. The sire and builder of the Trojan town 8.185. was Dardanus; but he, Electra's child 8.186. came over sea to Teucria; the sire 8.187. of fair Electra was great Atlas, he 8.188. whose shoulder carries the vast orb of heaven. 8.189. But thy progenitor was Mercury 8.190. and him conceiving, Maia, that white maid 8.191. on hoar Cyllene's frosty summit bore. 8.192. But Maia's sire, if aught of truth be told 8.193. was Atlas also, Atlas who sustains 8.194. the weight of starry skies. Thus both our tribes 8.195. are one divided stem. Secure in this 8.196. no envoys have I sent, nor tried thy mind 8.197. with artful first approaches, but myself 8.198. risking my person and my life, have come 8.199. a suppliant here. For both on me and thee 8.200. the house of Daunus hurls insulting war. 8.201. If us they quell, they doubt not to obtain 8.202. lordship of all Hesperia, and subdue 8.203. alike the northern and the southern sea. 8.204. Accept good faith, and give! Behold, our hearts 8.205. quail not in battle; souls of fire are we 8.207. Aeneas ceased. The other long had scanned 8.208. the hero's face, his eyes, and wondering viewed 8.209. his form and mien divine; in answer now 8.210. he briefly spoke: “With hospitable heart 8.211. O bravest warrior of all Trojan-born 8.212. I know and welcome thee. I well recall 8.213. thy sire Anchises, how he looked and spake. 8.214. For I remember Priam, when he came 8.215. to greet his sister, Queen Hesione 8.216. in Salamis, and thence pursued his way 8.217. to our cool uplands of Arcadia . 8.218. The bloom of tender boyhood then was mine 8.219. and with a wide-eyed wonder I did view 8.220. those Teucrian lords, Laomedon's great heir 8.221. and, towering highest in their goodly throng 8.222. Anchises, whom my warm young heart desired 8.223. to speak with and to clasp his hand in mine. 8.224. So I approached, and joyful led him home 8.225. to Pheneus' olden wall. He gave me gifts 8.226. the day he bade adieu; a quiver rare 8.227. filled with good Lycian arrows, a rich cloak 8.228. inwove with thread of gold, and bridle reins 8.229. all golden, now to youthful Pallas given. 8.230. Therefore thy plea is granted, and my hand 8.231. here clasps in loyal amity with thine. 8.232. To-morrow at the sunrise thou shalt have 8.233. my tribute for the war, and go thy way 8.234. my glad ally. But now this festival 8.235. whose solemn rite 't were impious to delay 8.236. I pray thee celebrate, and bring with thee 8.237. well-omened looks and words. Allies we are! 8.239. So saying, he bade his followers renew 8.240. th' abandoned feast and wine; and placed each guest 8.241. on turf-built couch of green, most honoring 8.242. Aeneas by a throne of maple fair 8.243. decked with a lion's pelt and flowing mane. 8.244. Then high-born pages, with the altar's priest 8.245. bring on the roasted beeves and load the board 8.246. with baskets of fine bread; and wine they bring — 8.247. of Ceres and of Bacchus gift and toil. 8.248. While good Aeneas and his Trojans share 8.250. When hunger and its eager edge were gone 8.251. Evander spoke: “This votive holiday 8.252. yon tables spread and altar so divine 8.253. are not some superstition dark and vain 8.254. that knows not the old gods, O Trojan King! 8.255. But as men saved from danger and great fear 8.256. this thankful sacrifice we pay. Behold 8.257. yon huge rock, beetling from the mountain wall 8.258. hung from the cliff above. How lone and bare 8.259. the hollowed mountain looks! How crag on crag 8.260. tumbled and tossed in huge confusion lie! 8.261. A cavern once it was, which ran deep down 8.262. into the darkness. There th' half-human shape 8.263. of Cacus made its hideous den, concealed 8.264. from sunlight and the day. The ground was wet 8.265. at all times with fresh gore; the portal grim 8.266. was hung about with heads of slaughtered men 8.267. bloody and pale—a fearsome sight to see. 8.268. Vulcan begat this monster, which spewed forth 8.269. dark-fuming flames from his infernal throat 8.270. and vast his stature seemed. But time and tide 8.271. brought to our prayers the advent of a god 8.272. to help us at our need. For Hercules 8.273. divine avenger, came from laying low 8.274. three-bodied Geryon, whose spoils he wore 8.275. exultant, and with hands victorious drove
19. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.1-1.5, 6.1-6.2, 6.64-6.73 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. You, Tityrus, 'neath a broad beech-canopy 1.2. reclining, on the slender oat rehearse 1.3. your silvan ditties: I from my sweet fields 1.4. and home's familiar bounds, even now depart. 1.5. Exiled from home am I; while, Tityrus, you 6.2. to Syracusan strains, nor blushed within 6.64. as with a beast to mate, though many a time 6.65. on her smooth forehead she had sought for horns 6.66. and for her neck had feared the galling plough. 6.69. reposing, under some dark ilex now 6.70. chews the pale herbage, or some heifer track 6.71. amid the crowding herd. Now close, ye Nymphs 6.73. if haply there may chance upon mine eye
20. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.5, 1.41-1.42, 2.136-2.176, 2.458, 3.1-3.48, 3.289, 4.559-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 3.289. As in mid ocean when a wave far of 4.559. With a great cry leapt on him, and ere he rose 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing 4.563. Fire and a fearful beast, and flowing stream. 4.564. But when no trickery found a path for flight 4.565. Baffled at length, to his own shape returned 4.566. With human lips he spake, “Who bade thee, then
21. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.27.7, 4.7.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Lucan, Pharsalia, 6.193, 6.536, 7.387-7.459, 8.755 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23. New Testament, Acts, 26.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26.18. to open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive remission of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in me.'
24. New Testament, Colossians, 1.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.13. who delivered us out of the power of darkness, and translated us into the Kingdom of the Son of his love;
25. New Testament, Ephesians, 2.2, 6.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. in which you once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the powers of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience; 6.12. For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world's rulers of the darkness of this age, and against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.
26. New Testament, Hebrews, 2.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.15. and might deliver all of them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.
27. New Testament, John, 12.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.31. Now is the judgment of this world. Now the prince of this world will be cast out.
28. Silius Italicus, Punica, 7.121-7.122, 12.394, 12.408-12.413, 13.791 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 23, 33, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. Lucian, A Professor of Public Speaking, 6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 11.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32. Tertullian, Apology, 2.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

33. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.77 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.77. For troubles and anxieties and feelings of anger and partiality do not accord with bliss, but always imply weakness and fear and dependence upon one's neighbours. Nor, again, must we hold that things which are no more than globular masses of fire, being at the same time endowed with bliss, assume these motions at will. Nay, in every term we use we must hold fast to all the majesty which attaches to such notions as bliss and immortality, lest the terms should generate opinions inconsistent with this majesty. Otherwise such inconsistency will of itself suffice to produce the worst disturbance in our minds. Hence, where we find phenomena invariably recurring, the invariableness of the recurrence must be ascribed to the original interception and conglomeration of atoms whereby the world was formed.
34. Claudianus, De Consulatu Stilichonis, 3.20 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

35. Anon., Pirqe Rabbi Eliezer, 13

36. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 123

37. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 76



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acheron, river Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289
allusion Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13
anger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
animal sacrifice, epistemology Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
animal sacrifice, eschatology' Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
aristaeus and orpheus Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 63
arnobius, concept of salvation Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atonement, as defeat of the devil nan
atonement, as means of deliverance from death nan
beasley, megan Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
callimachus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13; Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
castor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
ceres in lucretius, vergil, and ovid Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
christian responses to mountains Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
cicero Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
cornelius gallus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
croesus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
cult of the dead, roman Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
curtius, ernst robert Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
cyprian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
decemuiri Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289
demetrius Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diogenes of oenoanda Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diomedes the grammarian Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
dionysius of halicarnassus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
elysium Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
empedocleo-lucretian background in metamorphoses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
empedocles Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
ennius, standing in antiquity Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
ennius, time and space in Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 236; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
epicureanism, theories of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
epicureanism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
epicurus/epicureanism, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 24, 236, 244; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
eschatology, eschatological Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 3
eschatology, of stoicism Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
fate Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28, 84
fear Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
filth, and the plague Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
finales, book 1 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
finales Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
gallus, gaius cornelius (poet) Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
georgic poet, as iron age figure Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 63
ghost Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
gigantomachy Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
gods, the absence of their providence in lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
gregory of nyssa Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
hamilcar, father of hannibal Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290
helicon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289; Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
homer, standing in rome Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 236; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
imagery, fire Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236, 244
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
iron age, poet in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 63
jewish eschatology and apocalyptic literature Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
knowledge, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lactantius Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
lamenting, as a distortive evocation of bucolic song Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
livius andronicus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
locus amoenus, ancient sources for Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
locus amoenus, as ecphrasis Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
lucan, his other works, catachthonion Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
lucan, his other works, iliacon Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
lucian, charon Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius, on poetic primacy Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 63
lucretius, parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
lucretius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16, 117; Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86, 168
materialism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
metamorphoses, calliope Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, pierides contest with muses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metamorphoses, typhoeus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
metapoetic diction, fatum Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
methodius, symposium Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
mountains Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
naevius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 244
oracular, philosophy Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28
otium Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
ovid, and empedocles Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ovid, remythologizing lucretius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 168
ovid Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
pastoral, contest Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
pharsalia, name of the poem Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
philia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
philodemus, and parrhesia Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 86
pindar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13
piraeus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
plato Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
platonic, stoic Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13, 236, 244, 250
pompilius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 16
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
propertius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
pythagoreans, pythagoreanism, pythagorizing Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 3, 28, 84
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 27
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236, 250
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
rhetoric, agon Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
ross, d. o. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
sabine farm, the, as locus amoenus Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
scipio africanus, and achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, katabasis of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
scipio africanus, meeting with homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
senses, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, in the roman cult of the death Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
servius, on the locus amoenus Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 229
sibyl Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, and cicero Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 290
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, and virgil Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 28, 84
space and time in the ph. Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
sphragis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
stoicism, eschatology of Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 49
tertullian Simmons, Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian (1995) 148
thomas, r. f. Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
thucydides Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 348
topoi, of a day of doom, Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
underworld Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 289, 290, 291
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
venus, the opening hymn to Kazantzidis, Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura" (2021) 137
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 24
virgil, and ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 13
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil, and octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
virgil, as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
war, and agriculture Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 250
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236, 244
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244, 250
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 236
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244, 250
war, octavian as warrior Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 244
xenophanes Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70