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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 1.100
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 337, 336 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

336. Should not be seized – god-sent, it’s better far.
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 225-247, 224 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

224. The sacrificer of his daughter — strange! —
3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

26b. cared much or little for these things. But nevertheless, tell us, how do you say, Meletus, that I corrupt the youth? Or is it evident, according to the indictment you brought, that it is by teaching them not to believe in the gods the state believes in, but in other new spiritual beings? Do you not say that it is by teaching this that I corrupt them? Very decidedly that is what I say. Then, Meletus, for the sake of
8. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.49, 1.116-1.121 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.49. Yet their form is not corporeal, but only resembles bodily substance; it does not contain blood, but the semblance of blood. "These discoveries of Epicurus are so acute in themselves and so subtly expressed that not everyone would be capable of appreciating them. Still I may rely on your intelligence, and make my exposition briefer than the subject demands. Epicurus then, as he not merely discerns abstruse and recondite things with his mind's eye, but handles them as tangible realities, teaches that the substance and nature of the gods is such that, in the first place, it is perceived not by the senses but by the mind, and not materially or individually, like the solid objects which Epicurus in virtue of their substantiality entitles steremnia; but by our perceiving images owing to their similarity and succession, because an endless train of precisely similar images arises from the innumerable atoms and streams towards the gods, our minds with the keenest feelings of pleasure fixes its gaze on these images, and so attains an understanding of the nature of a being both blessed and eternal. 1.116. 'But deity possesses an excellence and pre‑eminence which must of its own nature attract the worship of the wise.' Now how can there be any excellence in a being so engrossed in the delights of his own pleasure that he always has been, is, and will continue to be entirely idle and inactive? Furthermore how can you owe piety to a person who has bestowed nothing upon you? or how can you owe anything at all to one who has done you no service? Piety is justice towards the gods; but how can any claims of justice exist between us and them, if god and man have nothing in common? Holiness is the science of divine worship; but I fail to see why the gods should be worshipped if we neither have received nor hope to receive benefit from them. 1.117. On the other hand what reason is there for adoring the gods on the ground of our admiration for the divine nature, if we cannot see that that nature possesses any special excellence? "As for freedom from superstition, which is the favourite boast of your school, that is easy to attain when you have deprived the gods of all power; unless perchance you think that it was possible for Diagoras or Theodorus to be superstitious, who denied the existence of the gods altogether. For my part, I don't see how it was possible even for Protagoras, who was not certain either that the gods exist or that they do not. For the doctrines of all these thinkers abolish not only superstition, which implies a groundless fear of the gods, but also religion, which consists in piously worshipping them. 1.118. Take again those who have asserted that the entire notion of the immortal gods is a fiction invented by wise men in the interest of the state, to the end that those whom reason was powerless to control might be led in the path of duty by religion; surely this view was absolutely and entirely destructive of religion. Or Prodicus of Ceos,',WIDTH,)" onmouseout="nd();"º who said that the gods were personifications of things beneficial to the life of man — pray what religion was left by his theory? 1.119. Or those who teach that brave or famous or powerful men have been deified after death, and that it is these who are the real objects of the worship, prayers and adoration which we are accustomed to offer — are not they entirely devoid of all sense of religion? This theory was chiefly developed by Euhemerus, who was translated and imitated especially by our poet Ennius. Yet Euhemerus describes the death and burial of certain gods; are we then to think of him as upholding religion, or rather as utterly and entirely destroying it? I say nothing of the holy and awe‑inspiring sanctuary of Eleusis, Where tribes from earth's remotest confines seek Initiation, and I pass over Samothrace and those occult mysteries Which throngs of worshippers at dead of night In forest coverts deep do celebrate at Lemnos, since such mysteries when interpreted and rationalized prove to have more to do with natural science than with theology. 1.120. For my own part I believe that even that very eminent man Democritus, the fountain-head from which Epicurus derived the streams that watered his little garden, has no fixed opinion about the nature of the gods. At one moment he holds the view that the universe includes images endowed with divinity; at another he says that there exist in this same universe the elements from which the mind is compounded, and that these are gods; at another, that they are animate images, which are wont to exercise a beneficent or harmful influence over us; and again that they are certain vast images of such a size as to envelop and enfold the entire world. All these fancies are more worthy of Democritus's native city than of himself; 1.121. for who could form a mental picture of such images? who could adore them and deem them worthy of worship or reverence? "Epicurus however, in abolishing divine beneficence and divine benevolence, uprooted and exterminated all religion from the human heart. For while asserting the supreme goodness and excellence of the divine nature, he yet denies to god the attribute of benevolence — that is to say, he does away with that which is the most essential element of supreme goodness and excellence. For what can be better or more excellent than kindness and beneficence? Make out god to be devoid of either, and you make him devoid of all love, affection or esteem for any other being, human or divine. It follows not merely that the gods do not care for mankind, but that they have no care for one another. How much more truth there is in the Stoics, whom you censure! They hold that all wise men are friends, even when strangers to each other, since nothing is more lovable than virtue, and he that attains to it will have our esteem in whatever country he dwells.
9. Varro, On The Latin Language, 6.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.1.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.70.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.70.1.  The sixth division of his religious institutions was devoted to those the Romans call Salii, whom Numa himself appointed out of the patricians, choosing twelve young men of the most graceful appearance. These are the Salii whose holy things are deposited on the Palatine hill and who are themselves called the (Salii) Palatini; for the (Salii) Agonales, by some called the Salii Collini, the repository of whose holy things is on the Quirinal hill, were appointed after Numa's time by King Hostilius, in pursuance of a vow he had made in the war against the Sabines. All these Salii are a kind of dancers and singers of hymns in praise of the gods of war.
12. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.99, 1.101-1.145, 1.932, 2.5-2.6, 2.24-2.29, 2.47-2.54, 2.68, 2.317-2.322, 2.352-2.373, 2.594-2.595, 2.646-2.651, 2.992-2.997, 2.1157-2.1174, 3.23-3.24, 3.59-3.78, 3.654-3.656, 4.7, 4.967-4.968, 4.1013-4.1015, 5.43-5.51, 5.110-5.155, 5.165-5.168, 5.181-5.186, 5.195-5.415, 5.864-5.870, 5.933-5.936, 5.999-5.1010, 5.1110-5.1111, 5.1129-5.1130, 5.1194-5.1240, 5.1247-5.1248, 5.1281-5.1349, 5.1361-5.1378, 5.1389, 5.1423-5.1435, 5.1448, 5.1452, 6.1-6.42, 6.75-6.78, 6.379-6.382, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Ovid, Fasti, 1.323-1.324, 1.327-1.328, 1.334, 1.337-1.456 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.323. Some believe that the day is called Agonal because 1.324. The sheep do not come to the altar but are driven (agantur). 1.327. Or because the victim fears the knife mirrored in the water 1.328. The day might be so called from the creature’s agony? 1.334. Must appease the gods with the mate of a woolly ewe. 1.337. Cornmeal, and glittering grains of pure salt 1.338. Were once the means for men to placate the gods. 1.339. No foreign ship had yet brought liquid myrrh 1.340. Extracted from tree’s bark, over the ocean waves: 1.341. Euphrates had not sent incense, nor India balm 1.342. And the threads of yellow saffron were unknown. 1.343. The altar was happy to fume with Sabine juniper 1.344. And the laurel burned with a loud crackling. 1.345. He was rich, whoever could add violet 1.346. To garlands woven from meadow flowers. 1.347. The knife that bares the entrails of the stricken bull 1.348. Had no role to perform in the sacred rites. 1.349. Ceres was first to delight in the blood of the greedy sow 1.350. Her crops avenged by the rightful death of the guilty creature 1.351. She learned that in spring the grain, milky with sweet juice 1.352. Had been uprooted by the snouts of bristling pigs. 1.353. The swine were punished: terrified by that example 1.354. You should have spared the vine-shoots, he-goat. 1.355. Watching a goat nibbling a vine someone once 1.356. Vented their indignation in these words: 1.357. ‘Gnaw the vine, goat! But when you stand at the altar 1.358. There’ll be something from it to sprinkle on your horns.’ 1.359. Truth followed: Bacchus, your enemy is given you 1.360. To punish, and sprinkled wine flows over its horns. 1.361. The sow suffered for her crime, and the goat for hers: 1.362. But what were you guilty of you sheep and oxen? 1.363. Aristaeus wept because he saw his bees destroyed 1.364. And the hives they had begun left abandoned. 1.365. His azure mother, Cyrene, could barely calm his grief 1.366. But added these final words to what she said: 1.367. ‘Son, cease your tears! Proteus will allay your loss 1.368. And show you how to recover what has perished. 1.369. But lest he still deceives you by changing shape 1.370. Entangle both his hands with strong fastenings.’ 1.371. The youth approached the seer, who was fast asleep 1.372. And bound the arms of that Old Man of the Sea. 1.373. He by his art altered his shape and transformed his face 1.374. But soon reverted to his true form, tamed by the ropes. 1.375. Then raising his dripping head, and sea-green beard 1.376. He said: ‘Do you ask how to recover your bees? 1.377. Kill a heifer and bury its carcase in the earth 1.378. Buried it will produce what you ask of me.’ 1.379. The shepherd obeyed: the beast’s putrid corpse 1.380. Swarmed: one life destroyed created thousands. 1.381. Death claims the sheep: wickedly, it grazed the vervain 1.382. That a pious old woman offered to the rural gods. 1.383. What creature’s safe if woolly sheep, and oxen 1.384. Broken to the plough, lay their lives on the altar? 1.385. Persia propitiates Hyperion, crowned with rays 1.386. With horses, no sluggish victims for the swift god. 1.387. Because a hind was once sacrificed to Diana the twin 1.388. Instead of Iphigeneia, a hind dies, though not for a virgin now. 1.389. I have seen a dog’s entrails offered to Trivia by Sapaeans 1.390. Whose homes border on your snows, Mount Haemus. 1.391. A young ass too is sacrificed to the erect rural guardian 1.392. Priapus, the reason’s shameful, but appropriate to the god. 1.393. Greece, you held a festival of ivy-berried Bacchus 1.394. That used to recur at the appointed time, every third winter. 1.395. There too came the divinities who worshipped him as Lyaeus 1.396. And whoever else was not averse to jesting 1.397. The Pans and the young Satyrs prone to lust 1.398. And the goddesses of rivers and lonely haunts. 1.399. And old Silenus came on a hollow-backed ass 1.400. And crimson Priapus scaring the timid birds with his rod. 1.401. Finding a grove suited to sweet entertainment 1.402. They lay down on beds of grass covered with cloths. 1.403. Liber offered wine, each had brought a garland 1.404. A stream supplied ample water for the mixing. 1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 1.411. So some create amorous passion in the Satyrs 1.412. Some in you, Pan, brows wreathed in pine. 1.413. You too Silenus, are on fire, insatiable lecher: 1.414. Wickedness alone prevents you growing old. 1.415. But crimson Priapus, guardian and glory of gardens 1.416. of them all, was captivated by Lotis: 1.417. He desires, and prays, and sighs for her alone 1.418. He signals to her, by nodding, woos her with signs. 1.419. But the lovely are disdainful, pride waits on beauty: 1.420. She laughed at him, and scorned him with a look. 1.421. It was night, and drowsy from the wine 1.422. They lay here and there, overcome by sleep. 1.423. Tired from play, Lotis rested on the grassy earth 1.424. Furthest away, under the maple branches. 1.425. Her lover stood, and holding his breath, stole 1.426. Furtively and silently towards her on tiptoe. 1.427. Reaching the snow-white nymph’s secluded bed 1.428. He took care lest the sound of his breath escaped. 1.429. Now he balanced on his toes on the grass nearby: 1.430. But she was still completely full of sleep. 1.431. He rejoiced, and drawing the cover from her feet 1.432. He happily began to have his way with her. 1.433. Suddenly Silenus’ ass braying raucously 1.434. Gave an untimely bellow from its jaws. 1.435. Terrified the nymph rose, pushed Priapus away 1.436. And, fleeing, gave the alarm to the whole grove. 1.437. But the over-expectant god with his rigid member 1.438. Was laughed at by them all, in the moonlight. 1.439. The creator of that ruckus paid with his life 1.440. And he’s the sacrifice dear to the Hellespontine god. 1.441. You were chaste once, you birds, a rural solace 1.442. You harmless race that haunt the woodlands 1.443. Who build your nests, warm your eggs with your wings 1.444. And utter sweet measures from your ready beaks 1.445. But that is no help to you, because of your guilty tongues 1.446. And the gods’ belief that you reveal their thoughts. 1.447. Nor is that false: since the closer you are to the gods 1.448. The truer the omens you give by voice and flight. 1.449. Though long untouched, birds were killed at last 1.450. And the gods delighted in the informers’ entrails. 1.451. So the white dove, torn from her mate 1.452. Is often burned in the Idalian flames: 1.453. Nor did saving the Capitol benefit the goose 1.454. Who yielded his liver on a dish to you, Inachus’ daughter: 1.455. The cock is sacrificed at night to the Goddess, Night 1.456. Because he summons the day with his waking cries
14. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.366-1.387, 1.390-1.394, 1.411-1.415, 15.110-15.142, 15.340-15.355 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.21-4.22, 5.60-5.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.21. be seen of them, and with his father's worth 4.22. reign o'er a world at peace. For thee, O boy 5.60. in summer's heat. Nor on the reeds alone 5.61. but with thy voice art thou, thrice happy boy
16. Vergil, Georgics, 1.1-1.5, 1.41-1.42, 1.133, 2.458-2.542, 3.77, 3.81-3.82, 3.102, 3.478-3.566, 4.295-4.314, 4.549-4.551 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star 1.2. Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod 1.3. Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; 1.4. What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof 1.5. of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;— 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.461. With keen-edged sickle, but let the leaves alone 2.462. Be culled with clip of fingers here and there. 2.463. But when they clasp the elms with sturdy trunk 2.464. Erect, then strip the leaves off, prune the boughs; 2.465. Sooner they shrink from steel, but then put forth 2.466. The arm of power, and stem the branchy tide. 2.467. Hedges too must be woven and all beast 2.468. Barred entrance, chiefly while the leaf is young 2.469. And witless of disaster; for therewith 2.470. Beside harsh winters and o'erpowering sun 2.471. Wild buffaloes and pestering goats for ay 2.472. Besport them, sheep and heifers glut their greed. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.475. So scathe it, as the flocks with venom-bite 2.476. of their hard tooth, whose gnawing scars the stem. 2.477. For no offence but this to Bacchus bleed 2.478. The goat at every altar, and old play 2.479. Upon the stage find entrance; therefore too 2.480. The sons of Theseus through the country-side— 2.481. Hamlet and crossway—set the prize of wit 2.482. And on the smooth sward over oiled skin 2.483. Dance in their tipsy frolic. Furthermore 2.484. The Ausonian swains, a race from placeName key= 2.485. Make merry with rough rhymes and boisterous mirth 2.486. Grim masks of hollowed bark assume, invoke 2.487. Thee with glad hymns, O Bacchus, and to thee 2.488. Hang puppet-faces on tall pines to swing. 2.489. Hence every vineyard teems with mellowing fruit 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.502. Round on the labourer spins the wheel of toil 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 2.505. And the chill north wind from the forests shook 2.506. Their coronal, even then the careful swain 2.507. Looks keenly forward to the coming year 2.508. With Saturn's curved fang pursues and prune 2.509. The vine forlorn, and lops it into shape. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.511. And burn the refuse-branches, first to house 2.512. Again your vine-poles, last to gather fruit. 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 2.527. When once they have gripped the soil, and borne the breeze. 2.528. Earth of herself, with hooked fang laid bare 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 2.530. The ploughshare aiding; therewithal thou'lt rear 2.531. The olive's fatness well-beloved of Peace. 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 2.541. To plant, nor lavish of their pains? Why trace 2.542. Things mightier? Willows even and lowly broom 3.77. The age for Hymen's rites, Lucina's pangs 3.81. Survives within them, loose the males: be first 3.82. To speed thy herds of cattle to their loves 3.102. And sorrel. Then lo! if arms are clashed afar 3.478. Many there be who from their mothers keep 3.479. The new-born kids, and straightway bind their mouth 3.480. With iron-tipped muzzles. What they milk at dawn 3.481. Or in the daylight hours, at night they press; 3.482. What darkling or at sunset, this ere morn 3.483. They bear away in baskets—for to town 3.484. The shepherd hies him—or with dash of salt 3.485. Just sprinkle, and lay by for winter use. 3.486. Nor be thy dogs last cared for; but alike 3.487. Swift Spartan hounds and fierce Molossian feed 3.488. On fattening whey. Never, with these to watch 3.489. Dread nightly thief afold and ravening wolves 3.490. Or Spanish desperadoes in the rear. 3.491. And oft the shy wild asses thou wilt chase 3.492. With hounds, too, hunt the hare, with hounds the doe; 3.493. oft from his woodland wallowing-den uprouse 3.494. The boar, and scare him with their baying, and drive 3.495. And o'er the mountains urge into the toil 3.496. Some antlered monster to their chiming cry. 3.497. Learn also scented cedar-wood to burn 3.498. Within the stalls, and snakes of noxious smell 3.499. With fumes of galbanum to drive away. 3.500. oft under long-neglected cribs, or lurk 3.501. A viper ill to handle, that hath fled 3.502. The light in terror, or some snake, that wont 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 3.504. Its bane among the cattle, hugs the ground 3.505. Fell scourge of kine. Shepherd, seize stakes, seize stones! 3.506. And as he rears defiance, and puffs out 3.507. A hissing throat, down with him! see how low 3.508. That cowering crest is vailed in flight, the while 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep 3.531. When chilly showers have probed them to the quick 3.532. And winter stark with hoar-frost, or when sweat 3.533. Unpurged cleaves to them after shearing done 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 3.536. While, plunged beneath the flood, with drenched fell 3.537. The ram, launched free, goes drifting down the tide. 3.538. Else, having shorn, they smear their bodies o'er 3.539. With acrid oil-lees, and mix silver-scum 3.540. And native sulphur and Idaean pitch 3.541. Wax mollified with ointment, and therewith 3.542. Sea-leek, strong hellebores, bitumen black. 3.543. Yet ne'er doth kindlier fortune crown his toil 3.544. Than if with blade of iron a man dare lance 3.545. The ulcer's mouth ope: for the taint is fed 3.546. And quickened by confinement; while the swain 3.547. His hand of healing from the wound withholds 3.548. Or sits for happier signs imploring heaven. 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.551. By thirsty fever are consumed, 'tis good 3.552. To draw the enkindled heat therefrom, and pierce 3.553. Within the hoof-clefts a blood-bounding vein. 3.554. of tribes Bisaltic such the wonted use 3.555. And keen Gelonian, when to 3.556. He flies, or Getic desert, and quaffs milk 3.557. With horse-blood curdled. Seest one far afield 3.558. oft to the shade's mild covert win, or pull 3.559. The grass tops listlessly, or hindmost lag 3.560. Or, browsing, cast her down amid the plain 3.561. At night retire belated and alone; 3.562. With quick knife check the mischief, ere it creep 3.563. With dire contagion through the unwary herd. 3.564. Less thick and fast the whirlwind scours the main 3.565. With tempest in its wake, than swarm the plague 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone 4.295. Alive they soar, and mount the heights of heaven. 4.296. If now their narrow home thou wouldst unseal 4.297. And broach the treasures of the honey-house 4.298. With draught of water first toment thy lips 4.299. And spread before thee fumes of trailing smoke. 4.300. Twice is the teeming produce gathered in 4.301. Twofold their time of harvest year by year 4.302. Once when Taygete the Pleiad uplift 4.303. Her comely forehead for the earth to see 4.304. With foot of scorn spurning the ocean-streams 4.305. Once when in gloom she flies the watery Fish 4.306. And dips from heaven into the wintry wave. 4.307. Unbounded then their wrath; if hurt, they breathe 4.308. Venom into their bite, cleave to the vein 4.309. And let the sting lie buried, and leave their live 4.310. Behind them in the wound. But if you dread 4.311. Too rigorous a winter, and would fain 4.312. Temper the coming time, and their bruised heart 4.313. And broken estate to pity move thy soul 4.314. Yet who would fear to fumigate with thyme 4.549. The watery folk that people the waste sea 4.550. Sprinkled the bitter brine-dew far and wide. 4.551. Along the shore in scattered groups to feed
17. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.77, 10.120 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.77. For troubles and anxieties and feelings of anger and partiality do not accord with bliss, but always imply weakness and fear and dependence upon one's neighbours. Nor, again, must we hold that things which are no more than globular masses of fire, being at the same time endowed with bliss, assume these motions at will. Nay, in every term we use we must hold fast to all the majesty which attaches to such notions as bliss and immortality, lest the terms should generate opinions inconsistent with this majesty. Otherwise such inconsistency will of itself suffice to produce the worst disturbance in our minds. Hence, where we find phenomena invariably recurring, the invariableness of the recurrence must be ascribed to the original interception and conglomeration of atoms whereby the world was formed.
18. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124, 123

19. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 76



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action, and cult Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
action, epicurean theory of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
aeschylus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 104
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
afterlife Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211
agamemnon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
altars Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
anger Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
animals, and plague Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
animals, asictims Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
animals, sacrificial Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47, 104, 109, 110
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47, 104, 109, 110
anthropomorphism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47
anthropomorphization Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
aqedah, rabbinic account of Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 271
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 110
atheism, atheists Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
aulis Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 214
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 213, 257
belief, cultural Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
belief, in gods/goddesses Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
belief, religious Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
belief, theological Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
birds Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
bougonia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 110
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47, 104, 109, 110
colline gate Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
cult, action Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
cult, practices Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
cult, theory of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
cycle of growth and decay, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
damis, epicurean Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
de rerum natura (lucretius) Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 47
death, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 110
diana, altar of at aulis Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 214
diogenes laertius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
diogenes of oenoanda Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
empedocles Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 104, 109, 110; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 257
epicureanism, theories of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
epicurus, epicurean Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
epicurus/epicureanism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 190
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 104, 239; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
etymology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
families Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
fear, experienced by animals Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211
fear Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
finales, book 3 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47
finales, book 4 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 110
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47
focalization Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 213, 214, 236
ghost Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
gods/goddesses, belief in Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 70
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46
guide Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
haruspices, and lightning Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47
intention Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46
iphigenia/iphianassa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 211, 213, 214, 236, 257
iphigenia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 104, 109
justice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
lucian Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
lucretius, culture-history in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 47
lucretius, epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
lucretius, politics in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 104, 239
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
lucretius Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 190
lucretius carus, t Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 99
lucretius carus, titus Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
marcus (character of de legibus) Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 99
materialism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
memmius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 213
metamorphoses, deucalion and pyrrha Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 190
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 239
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
mirabilia, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46
myth, mythical, mythological Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
niobe Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
noricum (cattle plague) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
nymphs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 110
octavian Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
ovid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
perception, sensory perception Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
perses Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 213, 236; Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46, 47, 109, 110; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211, 257
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
politics, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
politics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
prayer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 104
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24, 47, 239
psychological mode, desire Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
pythagoras Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
quirinal hill Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
ratio Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211
readers, modern Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211
reason Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 213
reincarnation/transmigration Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 236
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 213, 214, 236
religio Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 104, 239
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109, 110
religion Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301; Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 236
sacrifice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30, 236; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 237
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
sheep Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 109
socrates Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
superstition Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301; Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
theology Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301
thucydides Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 46
touch, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 36
tullius cicero, m. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
uates Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 171
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 24
virgil Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 257
virtue' Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
voltaire Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 211
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, punic wars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
war, trojan war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 239
wiseman, t p Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 99
xenophanes Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 70
zeus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 301