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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7553
Lucian, Toxaris Or Friendship, 53


nan‘Behold,’ said Macentes, presenting Mazaea to Arsacomas, ‘behold your promised bride.’ Arsacomas, amazed at so unexpected a sight, was beginning to express his gratitude: but Macentes bade him hold his peace. ‘You speak,’ he exclaimed, ‘as if you and I were different persons, when you thank me for what I have done. It is as if my left hand should say to my right: Thank you for tending my wound; thank you for your generous sympathy with my pain. That would be no more absurd than for us — who have long been united, and have become (so far as such a thing may be) one flesh — to make such ado because one part of us has done its duty by the whole; the limb is but serving its own interest in promoting the welfare of the body.’ And that was how Macentes received his friend’s thanks.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 3.87 (1st cent. CE

2. Lucian, Toxaris Or Friendship, 51, 54, 60, 62-63, 50 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

50. And now for my own news. You will shortly be invaded by a large host under Arsacomas the son of Mariantas, who was lately at your court as an ambassador. I suppose the cause of his resentment is your refusing him your daughter’s hand. He has now been on the ox hide for seven days, and has got together a considerable force.’ ‘I had heard,’ exclaimed Leucanor, ‘that an army was being raised on the hide: but who was raising it, and what was its destination, I had no idea.’ ‘You know now,’ said Lonchates. ‘Arsacomas is a personal enemy of mine: the superior esteem in which I am held, and the preference shown for me by our elders, are things which he cannot forgive. Now promise me your other daughter Barcetis: apart from my present services, I shall be no discreditable son in law: promise me this, and in no long time I will return bringing you the head of Arsacomas.’ ‘I promise,’ cried the king, in great perturbation; for he realized the provocation he had given to Arsacomas, and had a wholesome respect for the Scythians at all times. ‘Swear,’ insisted Lonchates, ‘that you will not go back from your promise.’ The king was already raising up his hand to Heaven, when the other interrupted him. ‘Wait!’ he exclaimed; ‘not here! these people must not know what is the subject of our oath. Let us go into the temple of Ares yonder, and swear with closed doors, where none may hear. If Arsacomas should get wind of this, I am likely to be offered up as a preliminary sacrifice; he has a good number of men already.’ ‘To the temple, then, let us go,’ said the king; and he ordered the guards to remain aloof, and forbade anyone to approach the temple unless summoned by him. As soon as they were inside, and the guards had withdrawn, Lonchates drew his sword, and putting his left hand on the king’s mouth to prevent his crying out, plunged it into his breast; then, cutting off his head, he went out from the temple carrying it under his cloak; affecting all the time to be speaking to the king, and promising that he would not be long, as if the king had sent him on some errand. He thus succeeded in reaching the place where he had left his horse tethered, leapt on to his back, and rode off into Scythia. There was no pursuit: the people of Bosphorus took some time to discover what had happened; and then they were occupied with disputes as to the succession. Thus Lonchates fulfilled his promise, and handed the head of Leucanor to Arsacomas.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
affection Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
black sea novels Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 62
body Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
dio chrysostom (of prusa) Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
eubiotus Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 61, 62
fluidity of novelistic narrative Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 61, 62, 63
friendship Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
geryon Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
love Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
lucian, and greek novels Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66
lucian of samosata Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
metaphors' Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 331
scythia as liminal space Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 66
scythians Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 65, 66
toxaris, abridgement theory Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 62, 63, 64
toxaris, aetiological digression Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 61
toxaris, narratives of deception Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 64
toxaris, oral improvisation Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 63, 64, 65