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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7536
Lucian, The Lover Of Lies, 9-10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. New Testament, Mark, 1.1, 2.12, 3.11, 5.21-5.24, 5.35-5.43, 6.2, 7.32, 7.37, 9.15, 9.27, 10.16, 11.18, 15.5, 15.39, 16.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. 2.12. He arose, and immediately took up the mat, and went out in front of them all; so that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, "We never saw anything like this! 3.11. The unclean spirits, whenever they saw him, fell down before him, and cried, "You are the Son of God! 5.21. When Jesus had crossed back over in the boat to the other side, a great multitude was gathered to him; and he was by the sea. 5.22. Behold, one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name, came; and seeing him, he fell at his feet 5.23. and begged him much, saying, "My little daughter is at the point of death. Please come and lay your hands on her, that she may be made healthy, and live. 5.24. He went with him, and a great multitude followed him, and they pressed upon him on all sides. 5.35. While he was still speaking, they came from the synagogue ruler's house saying, "Your daughter is dead. Why bother the Teacher any more? 5.36. But Jesus, when he heard the message spoken, immediately said to the ruler of the synagogue, "Don't be afraid, only believe. 5.37. He allowed no one to follow him, except Peter, James, and John the brother of James. 5.38. He came to the synagogue ruler's house, and he saw an uproar, weeping, and great wailing. 5.39. When he had entered in, he said to them, "Why do you make an uproar and weep? The child is not dead, but is asleep. 5.40. They laughed him to scorn. But he, having put them all out, took the father of the child and her mother and those who were with him, and went in where the child was lying. 5.41. Taking the child by the hand, he said to her, "Talitha cumi;" which means, being interpreted, "Young lady, I tell you, get up. 5.42. Immediately the young lady rose up, and walked, for she was twelve years old. They were amazed with great amazement. 5.43. He strictly ordered them that no one should know this, and commanded that something should be given to her to eat. 6.2. When the Sabbath had come, he began to teach in the synagogue, and many hearing him were astonished, saying, "Where did this man get these things?" and, "What is the wisdom that is given to this man, that such mighty works come about by his hands? 7.32. They brought to him one who was deaf and had an impediment in his speech. They begged him to lay his hand on him. 7.37. They were astonished beyond measure, saying, "He has done all things well. He makes even the deaf hear, and the mute speak! 9.15. Immediately all the multitude, when they saw him, were greatly amazed, and running to him greeted him. 9.27. But Jesus took him by the hand, and raised him up; and he arose. 10.16. He took them in his arms, and blessed them, laying his hands on them. 11.18. The chief priests and the scribes heard it, and sought how they might destroy him. For they feared him, for all the multitude was astonished at his teaching. 15.5. But Jesus made no further answer, so that Pilate marveled. 15.39. When the centurion, who stood by opposite him, saw that he cried out like this and breathed his last, he said, "Truly this man was the Son of God! 16.18. they will take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it will in no way hurt them; they will lay hands on the sick, and they will recover.
2. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 39.1-39.18, 42.1-42.15, 50.56 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 71.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 12-23, 29-31, 9, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 7.38 (2nd cent. CE

7.38. Damis says that though Apollonius uttered many more discourses of the same kind, he was himself in despair of the situation, because he saw no way out of it except such as the gods have vouchsafed to some in answer to prayer, when they were in even worse straits. But a little before midday, he tells us that he said: O man of Tyana, — for he took a special pleasure, it appears, in being called by that name, — what is to become of us? Why what has become of us already, said Apollonius, and nothing more, for no one is going to kill us. And who, said Damis, is so invulnerable as that? But will you ever be liberated? So far as it rests with the verdict of the court, said Apollonius, I shall be set at liberty this day, but so far as depend upon my own will, now and here. And with these words he took his leg out of the fetters and remarked to Damis: Here is proof positive to you of my freedom, to cheer you up. Damis says that it was then for the first time that he really and truly understood the nature of Apollonius, to wit that it was divine and superhuman, for without sacrifice — and how in prison could he have offered any? — and without a single prayer, without even a word, he quietly laughed at the fetters, and then inserted his leg in them afresh, and behaved like a prisoner once more.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amulets Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 136, 137
animals, lions Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117
apollonius of tyana Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 197
aristides, aelius Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195
asclepius Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195, 196; Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117, 136
babylon Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 196
cassius dio Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
celsus Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
damascius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
divination Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
domitian Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 197
egypt Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
exorcism Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
flee-formula(e Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 136
galen Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117, 136, 142
healing, miraculous Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195, 196, 197
healing Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117, 136, 142
hippocrates Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117, 136, 142
holy man Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
iamata Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 137
iamblichus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
illnesses Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 136, 137
incantation Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 136, 137
inscription Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
jesus Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 136, 142
julian (emperor) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
julianus of athens (rhetorician) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
lucian Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117, 136, 142; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
lucian of samosata Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195, 196, 197
magic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
marcus aurelius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
miracle /\u2009miraculous Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
miracles Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195, 196, 197
moses Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
neoplatonism, neoplatonic school of athens Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
nero Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 197
oracle Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
origen Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
paradoxa Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 197
pergamon, sanctuary of asclepius at Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 195
peripatos/\u2009peripatetics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
persia Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
philostratus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
platonism / platonic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
podagra, as goddess Clarke, King, Baltussen, Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings: Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering (2023) 136
porphyry Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
proclus (neoplatonist) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
school, philosophical schools Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
second sophistic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
sorcery' Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 117
sorcery Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 142
statues of the gods Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 197
teacher Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
virtue Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241