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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7536
Lucian, The Lover Of Lies, 31
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Martial, Epigrams, 12.23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Martial, Epigrams, 12.23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. New Testament, 1 Peter, 5.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.8. Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.
4. New Testament, Apocalypse, 13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Brutus, 36 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 69.2-69.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Cimon, 4.3-4.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Dion, 2.5-2.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 71.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 11-23, 29-30, 9-10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 6.6.7-6.6.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.6.7. On his return to Italy Euthymus fought against the Hero, the story about whom is as follows. Odysseus, so they say, in his wanderings after the capture of Troy was carried down by gales to various cities of Italy and Sicily, and among them he came with his ships to Temesa. Here one of his sailors got drunk and violated a maiden, for which offence he was stoned to death by the natives. 6.6.8. Now Odysseus, it is said, cared nothing about his loss and sailed away. But the ghost of the stoned man never ceased killing without distinction the people of Temesa, attacking both old and young, until, when the inhabitants had resolved to flee from Italy for good, the Pythian priestess forbad them to leave Temesa, and ordered them to propitiate the Hero, setting him a sanctuary apart and building a temple, and to give him every year as wife the fairest maiden in Temesa. 6.6.9. So they performed the commands of the god and suffered no more terrors from the ghost. But Euthymus happened to come to Temesa just at the time when the ghost was being propitiated in the usual way; learning what was going on he had a strong desire to enter the temple, and not only to enter it but also to look at the maiden. When he saw her he first felt pity and afterwards love for her. The girl swore to marry him if he saved her, and so Euthymus with his armour on awaited the onslaught of the ghost. 6.6.10. He won the fight, and the Hero was driven out of the land and disappeared, sinking into the depth of the sea. Euthymus had a distinguished wedding, and the inhabitants were freed from the ghost for ever. I heard another story also about Euthymus, how that he reached extreme old age, and escaping again from death departed from among men in another way. Temesa is still inhabited, as I heard from a man who sailed there as a merchant. 6.6.11. This I heard, and I also saw by chance a picture dealing with the subject. It was a copy of an ancient picture. There were a stripling, Sybaris, a river, Calabrus, and a spring, Lyca. Besides, there were a hero-shrine and the city of Temesa, and in the midst was the ghost that Euthymus cast out. Horribly black in color, and exceedingly dreadful in all his appearance, he had a wolf's skin thrown round him as a garment. The letters on the picture gave his name as Lycas.
12. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.8, 4.10, 4.20, 8.18-8.19 (2nd cent. CE

1.8. Now Euxenus realized that he was attached to a lofty ideal, and asked him at what point he would begin it. Apollonius answered: At the point at which physicians begin, for they, by purging the bowels of their patients prevent some from being ill at all, and heal others. And having said this he declined to live upon a flesh diet, on the ground that it was unclean, and also that it made the mind gross; so he partook only of dried fruits and vegetables, for he said that all the fruits of the earth are clean. And of wine he said that it was a clean drink because it is yielded to men by so well-domesticated a plant as the vine; but he declared that it endangered the mental balance and system and darkened, as with mud, the ether which is in the soul. After then having thus purged his interior, he took to walking without shoes by way of adornment and clad himself in linen raiment, declining to wear any animal product; and he let his hair grow long and lived in the Temple. And the people round about the Temple were struck with admiration for him, and the god Asclepius one day said to the priest that he was delighted to have Apollonius as witness of his cures of the sick; and such was his reputation that the Cilicians themselves and the people all around flocked to Aegae to visit him. Hence the Cilician proverb: Whither runnest thou? Is it to see the stripling? Such was the saying that arose about him, and it gained the distinction of becoming a proverb. 4.10. With such harangues as these he knit together the people of Smyrna; but when the plague began to rage in Ephesus, and no remedy sufficed to check it, they sent a deputation to Apollonius, asking him to become physician of their infirmity; and he thought that he ought not to postpone his journey, but said: Let us go. And forthwith he was in Ephesus, performing the same feat, I believe, as Pythagoras, who was in Thurii and Metapontum at one and the same moment. He therefore called together the Ephesians, and said: Take courage, for I will today put a stop to the course of the disease. And with these words he led the population entire to the theater, where the image of the Averting god has been set up. And there he saw what seemed an old mendicant artfully blinking his eyes as if blind, as he carried a wallet and a crust of bread in it; and he was clad in rags and was very squalid of countece. Apollonius therefore ranged the Ephesians around him and said: Pick up as many stones as you can and hurl them at this enemy of the gods. Now the Ephesians wondered what he meant, and were shocked at the idea of murdering a stranger so manifestly miserable; for he was begging and praying them to take mercy upon him. Nevertheless Apollonius insisted and egged on the Ephesians to launch themselves on him and not let him go. And as soon as some of them began to take shots and hit him with their stones, the beggar who had seemed to blink and be blind, gave them all a sudden glance and his eyes were full of fire. Then the Ephesians recognized that he was a demon, and they stoned him so thoroughly that their stones were heaped into a great cairn around him. After a little pause Apollonius bade them remove the stones and acquaint themselves with the wild animal they had slain. When therefore they had exposed the object which they thought they had thrown their missiles at, they found that he had disappeared and instead of him there was a hound who resembled in form and look a Molossian dog, but was in size the equal of the largest lion; there he lay before their eyes, pounded to a pulp by their stones and vomiting foam as mad dogs do. Accordingly the statue of the Averting god, Heracles, has been set up over the spot where the ghost was slain. 4.20. Now while he was discussing the question of libations, there chanced to be present in his audience a young dandy who bore so evil a reputation for licentiousness that his conduct had long been the subject of coarse street-corner songs. His home was Corcyra, and he traced his pedigree to Alcinous the Phaeacian who entertained Odysseus. Apollonius then was talking about libations, and was urging them not to drink out of a particular cup, but to reserve it for the gods, without ever touching it or drinking out of it. But when he also urged them to have handles on the cup, and to pour the libation over the handle, because that is the part at which men are least likely to drink, the youth burst out into loud and coarse laughter, and quite drowned his voice. Then Apollonius looked up and said: It is not yourself that perpetrates this insult, but the demon, who drives you without your knowing it. And in fact the youth was, without knowing it, possessed by a devil; for he would laugh at things that no one else laughed at, and then would fall to weeping for no reason at all, and he would talk and sing to himself. Now most people thought that it was boisterous humor of youth which led him into excesses; but he was really the mouthpiece of a devil, though it only seemed a drunken frolic in which on that occasion he was indulging. Now, when Apollonius gazed on him, the ghost in him began to utter cries of fear and rage, such as one hears from people who are being branded or racked; and the ghost swore that he would leave the you man alone and never take possession of any man again. But Apollonius addressed him with anger, as a master might a shifty, rascally, and shameless slave and so on, and he ordered him to quit the young man and show by a visible sign that he had done so. I will throw down yonder statue, said the devil, and pointed to one of the images which were there in the Royal Stoa, for there it was that the scene took place. But when the statue began by moving gently, and then fell down, it would defy anyone to describe the hubbub which arose thereat and the way they clapped their hand with wonder. But the young man rubbed his eyes as if he had just woke up, and he looked towards the rays of the sun, and assumed a modest aspect, as all had their attention concentrated on him; for he no longer showed himself licentious, nor did he stare madly about, but he had returned to his own self, as thoroughly as if he had been treated with drugs; and he gave up his dainty dress and summery garments and the rest of his sybaritic way of life, and he fell in love with the austerity of philosophers, and donned their cloak, and stripping off his old self modeled his life and future upon that of Apollonius. 8.18. There was a man of Thessaly, named Isagoras, whom he met in Olympia and said: Tell me, Isagoras, is there such a thing as a religious fair (panegyris)? Why yes, he replied, and by heaven there is nothing in the world of men, so agreeable and so dear to the gods. And what is the material of which it is composed? asked Apollonius; It is as if I asked you about the material of which this image is made, and you answered me that it was composed of gold and ivory. But, said the other, what material, Apollonius, can a thing which is incorporeal be composed of? A most important material, replied Apollonius, and most varied in character; for there are sacred precincts in it, and sanctuaries and race-courses and, of course, a scene-building, and tribes of men, some of them from neighboring countries, and others from over the borders, and even from across the sea. Moreover, he added, many arts go to make up such a festival, and many designs, and much true genius, both of poets, and of civil counselors, and of those who deliver harangues on philosophic topics, and contests between naked athletes, and contests of musicians, as is the custom in the Pythian festival. It seems to me, said the other, O Apollonius, that the festival is not only something corporeal, but is made up of more wonderful material than are cities; for there is summoned together into one community on such occasions the best of the best, and the most celebrated of the celebrated.Then, said Apollonius, O Isagoras, are we to consider the people we meet there in the same light as some people regard walls and ships, or do you need some other opinion of the festival? The opinion, answered the other, which we have formulated, is quite adequate and complete, O man of Tyana, and we had better adhere to it. And yet, said the other, it is neither adequate nor complete to one who considers about is as I do; for it appears to me that ships are in need of men and men of ships, and that men would never have thought about the sea at all if they had not had a ship; and men are kept safe by walls and walls by men; and in the same way I consider a festival to be not only the meeting of human beings, but also the place itself in which they have to meet, and the more so, because walls and ships would never have come into being, unless there had been men's hands to build them, while these places, so far forth as they are deprived of their natural and original characteristics, are by the hands of men spoiled; for it was owing to their natural advantages that they were held worthy of being made their meeting-places; for though the gymnasiums and porticoes and fountains and houses have been all created by human art, just like the walls and the ships, yet this river Alpheus with the hippodrome and the stadium and the groves, existed, I suppose, before men came here, the one providing water for drinking and for the bath, and the second a broad plain for the horses to race in, and the third provided just the space required for the athletes to raise the dust in as they run along in their races, namely a valley a stadium in length, and the groves supplied wreaths for the winners and served the athletes who were runners as a place to practice in. For I imagine that Heracles considered these facts, and because he admired the natural advantages of Olympia, he found the place worthy of the festival and games which are still held here. 8.19. After forty days, given up to discussions in Olympia, in which many topics were handled, Apollonius said: I will also, O men of Hellas, discourse to you in your several cities, at your festivals, at your religious processions, at your mysteries, your sacrifices, at your public libations, and they require the services of a clever man; but for the present I must go down to Lebadea, for I have never yet had an interview with Trophonius, although I once visited his shrine. And with these words he at once started for Boeotia attended by every one of his admirers. Now the cavern in Lebadea is dedicated to Trophonius, the son of Apollo, and it can only be entered by those who resort thither in order to get an oracle, and it is not visible in the sanctuary, but lies a little above it on a mound; and it is shut in by iron spits which surround it, and you descend into it as it were sitting down and being drawn down. Those who enter it are clad in white raiment, and are escorted thither with honey-cakes in their hands to appease the reptiles which assail them as they descend. But the earth brings them to the surface again, in some cases close by, but in other cases a long way off; for they are sent up to the surface beyond Locris and beyond Phocis, but most of them about the borders of Boeotia. Accordingly Apollonius entered the shrine and said: I wish to descend into the cave in the interests of philosophy.But the priests opposed him and though they told the multitude that they would never allow a wizard like him to examine and test the shrine, they pretended to the sage himself that there were forbidden days and days unclean for consulting. So on that day he delivered a discourse at the springs of Hercyne, about the origin and conduct of the shrine; for it is the only oracle which gives responses through the person himself who consults it. And when the evening approached, he went to the mouth of the cave with his train of youthful followers, and having pulled up four of the obelisks, which constitute a bar to the passage, he went down below ground wearing his philosopher's mantle, having dressed himself as if he were going to deliver an address upon philosophy — a step which the god Trophonius so thoroughly approved of, that he appeared to the priests and not only rebuked them for the reception they had given Apollonius, but enjoined them all to follow him to Aulis, for he said it was there that he would come to surface in such a marvelous fashion as no man before. And in fact he emerged after seven days, a longer period than it had taken anyone of those who until then had entered the oracle, and he had with him a volume thoroughly in keeping with the questions he had asked: for had gone down saying: What, O Trophonius, do you consider the most complete and purest philosophy? And the volume contained the tenets of Pythagoras, a good proof this, that the oracle was in agreement with this form of wisdom.
13. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.2006-4.2125 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age, old Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
age, youth Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
androgyne, or hermaphroditus Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
apollonius of rhodes Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
apollonius of tyana Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
apuleius Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
apuleius of madaura Dieleman, Priests, Tongues, and Rites: The London-Leiden Magical Manuscripts and Translation in Egyptian Ritual (100–300 CE) (2005) 245
artemidorus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
athens Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
beauty, attitude towards Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
body Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
cassius dio Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
christians, christianity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
cimon Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62, 68
costa, c. d. n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
daemones Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
daimon Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
damascius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
damon Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
death and the afterlife, conceptions of death Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
death and the afterlife, ghosts/restless spirits/revenants Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
deification Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
demons and food Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
dietary laws biblical Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
dietary laws demonological interpretation of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
dietary laws natural interpretation of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
diogenes Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
drama, comedy' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
egypt Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
elisha Klutz, The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts: A Sociostylistic Reading (2004) 73
empedocles Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
evil Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
exorcism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
felton, d. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
food, impurity of and demonology Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
food, impurity of offered to idols Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
fortune Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 68
ghostly appearances Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
ghosts Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51; Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62, 67, 68; Nicklas and Spittler, Credible, Incredible: The Miraculous in the Ancient Mediterranean. (2013) 45
good Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
healing Klutz, The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts: A Sociostylistic Reading (2004) 73
history Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
holy man Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
horace Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
iamblichus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
incantations Klutz, The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts: A Sociostylistic Reading (2004) 73
individual, profession Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
inscription Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
julian (emperor) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
julianus of athens (rhetorician) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
koinon (common) Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
love Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
lucian, philopseudes Dieleman, Priests, Tongues, and Rites: The London-Leiden Magical Manuscripts and Translation in Egyptian Ritual (100–300 CE) (2005) 245
lucian Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
lucullus Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
madness Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
magic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
marcus aurelius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
martial Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
miltiades Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
miracle /\u2009miraculous Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
name, secret Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 252
nature, and impurity Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
neoplatonism, neoplatonic school of athens Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
oracle Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
paganism Klutz, The Exorcism Stories in Luke-Acts: A Sociostylistic Reading (2004) 73
pancrates Dieleman, Priests, Tongues, and Rites: The London-Leiden Magical Manuscripts and Translation in Egyptian Ritual (100–300 CE) (2005) 245
peripatos/\u2009peripatetics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
persia Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
philopseudes, deceptive book Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 91
philopseudes, magical books Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 93
philopseudes, material text Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 91
philopseudes, oral narrative Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 94
philopseudes, phaedo Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 91
philopseudes, reading apista Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 93, 94
philopseudes, recreational reading Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 92, 93
philopseudes, theories about ghosts Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 91, 92
philosopher Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62, 67, 68
philostratus Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
plato Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
platonism / platonic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
platonist Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
pliny the younger Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
plutarch of chaeronea Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
plutarchs lives, life of brutus Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 67, 68
plutarchs lives, life of caesar Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 67, 68
plutarchs lives, life of cimon Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62, 68
polemic with jewish practices Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
porphyry Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
proclus (neoplatonist) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
pythagoras/pythagorean/pythagoreanism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
pythagoreanism Dieleman, Priests, Tongues, and Rites: The London-Leiden Magical Manuscripts and Translation in Egyptian Ritual (100–300 CE) (2005) 245
rome Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 62
satan Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 211
school, philosophical schools Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
second sophistic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
socrates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
spirit Leão and Lanzillotta, A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic (2019) 67, 68
stramaglia, antonio Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 409
synesius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
syria Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 51
teacher Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
temples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
thessalos of tralles Dieleman, Priests, Tongues, and Rites: The London-Leiden Magical Manuscripts and Translation in Egyptian Ritual (100–300 CE) (2005) 245
tomb Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 252
vates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
vice Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
virtue Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 241
wisdom Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201