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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7512
Lucian, The Dream, Or The Cock, 2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.243 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.243. /for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus
2. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

400c. ign ( σῆμα ). But I think it most likely that the Orphic poets gave this name, with the idea that the soul is undergoing punishment for something; they think it has the body as an enclosure to keep it safe, like a prison, and this is, as the name itself denotes, the safe ( σῶμα ) for the soul, until the penalty is paid, and not even a letter needs to be changed.
3. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

493b. in these uninitiate that part of the soul where the desires are, the licentious and fissured part, he named a leaky jar in his allegory, because it is so insatiate. So you see this person, Callicles, takes the opposite view to yours, showing how of all who are in Hades—meaning of course the invisible—these uninitiate will be most wretched, and will carry water into their leaky jar with a sieve which is no less leaky. And then by the sieve
4. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

108a. for he says a simple path leads to the lower world, but I think the path is neither simple nor single, for if it were, there would be no need of guides, since no one could miss the way to any place if there were only one road. But really there seem to be many forks of the road and many windings; this I infer from the rites and ceremonies practiced here on earth. Now the orderly and wise soul follows its guide and understands its circumstances; but the soul that is desirous of the body, as I said before, flits about it, and in the visible world for a long time
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. for Homer is constantly in the habit of calling kings shepherds of their People. But nature has appropriated this appellation as more peculiarly belonging to the good, since the wicked are rather tended by others than occupied in serving them; for they are led captive by strong wine, and by beauty, and by delicate eating, and sweetmeats, and by the arts of cooks and confectioners, to say nothing of the thirst of gold, and silver, and other things of a higher character. But men of the other class are not allured or led astray by any thing, but are rather inclined to admonish those whom they perceive to be caught in the toils of pleasure. VI.
7. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.8, 1.13, 1.17, 1.21, 1.23, 1.28, 1.65-1.84, 2.6, 3.41, 4.43-4.45 (1st cent. CE

8. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.35 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Lucian, The Dream, Or The Cock, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Lucian, Hercules, 4, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. Our Heracles is known among the Gauls under the local name of Ogmius; and the appearance he presents in their pictures is truly grotesque. They make him out as old as old can be: the few hairs he has left (he is quite bald in front) are dead white, and his skin is wrinkled and tanned as black as any old salt’s. You would take him for some infernal deity, for Charon or Iapetus,— anyone rather than Heracles. Such as he is, however, he has all the proper attributes of that God: the lion’s skin hangs over his shoulders, his right hand grasps the club, his left the strung bow, and a quiver is slung at his side; nothing is wanting to the Heraclean equipment.
11. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 47, 73, 29 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Her . Much better so, Lycinus. However, I know that, if you go the whole round, you will find no better guides or more expert pilots than the Stoics; if you mean ever to get to Corinth, you will follow them, in the tracks of Chrysippus and Zeno. It is the only way to do it.Ly . Ah, many can play at the game of assertion. Plato's fellow traveller, Epicurus's follower, and all the rest, will tell me just what you do, that I shall never get to Corinth except with whichever of them it is. So I must either believe them all, or disbelieve impartially. The latter is much the safest, until we have found out the truth.
12. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Phaedonem Commentaria, 1.3-1.5, 1.13 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
afterlife (also survival) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
allegory/allegorical interpretation Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
animal, sheep Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
bakkhoi' Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
body, nose Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
body Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
celts Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
citizenship Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
commentary (on the phaedo) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
damascius Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
desire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
divine being, hera Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
divine being, heracles Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
divine being, hermes Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
divine being, zeus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
economics, wealth Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
eloquence, art of Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
equality Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
ethnicity, lucian and Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
glory Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
heracles, celtic Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
iconography, and ethnicity Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
king, emperor, marcus aurelius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
king, emperor, trajan Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
life (in the general philosophical sense) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
lucian, heracles Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
lucian Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
myth Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
ogmios (celtic heracles) Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 59
olympiodorus Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
orphism Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
passion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
philosophy, stoic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
platonism, athenian neoplatonism Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
politics Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
purification (katharsis) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
pythagoreanism/pythagoreans Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
recollection Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
revelation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
rhetoric, dialogue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
rhetoric, imagery Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
rhetoric, metaphor Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
rhetoric, satire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
suicide Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
transmigration (of the soul) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140
tyranny Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274
virtue Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 140; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 274