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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Lucian, The Dance, 39
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 454-500, 889-900, 453 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

453. of her fear father, and Zeus gave her fame
2. Aristophanes, Frogs, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Bacchae, 743, 725 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

725. Ἴακχον ἀθρόῳ στόματι τὸν Διὸς γόνον 725. calling on Iacchus, the son of Zeus, Bromius, with united voice. The whole mountain revelled along with them and the beasts, and nothing was unmoved by their running. Agave happened to be leaping near me, and I sprang forth, wanting to snatch her
4. Euripides, Ion, 1001-1008, 20-24, 267-282, 999-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. Him whom Earth produced, the founder of thy race? Creusa
5. Herodotus, Histories, 8.65.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.65.1. Dicaeus son of Theocydes, an Athenian exile who had become important among the Medes, said that at the time when the land of Attica was being laid waste by Xerxes' army and there were no Athenians in the country, he was with Demaratus the Lacedaemonian on the Thriasian plain and saw advancing from Eleusis a cloud of dust as if raised by the feet of about thirty thousand men. They marvelled at what men might be raising such a cloud of dust and immediately heard a cry. The cry seemed to be the “Iacchus” of the mysteries
6. Isocrates, Orations, 12.126 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Menexenus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

237c. wherein they dwelt, which bare them and reared them and now at their death receives them again to rest in their own abodes. Most meet it is that first we should celebrate that Mother herself; for by so doing we shall also celebrate therewith the noble birth of these heroes.
8. Sophocles, Antigone, 1147-1148, 1146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Philochorus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 13 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

11. Catullus, Poems, 64.251 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.96, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.96. 1.  But now that we have examined these matters, we must enumerate what Greeks, who have won fame for their wisdom and learning, visited Egypt in ancient times, in order to become acquainted with its customs and learning.,2.  For the priests of Egypt recount from the records of their sacred books that they were visited in early times by Orpheus, Musaeus, Melampus, and Daedalus, also by the poet Homer and Lycurgus of Sparta, later by Solon of Athens and the philosopher Plato, and that there also came Pythagoras of Samos and the mathematician Eudoxus, as well as Democritus of Abdera and Oenopides of Chios.,3.  As evidence for the visits of all these men they point in some cases to their statues and in others to places or buildings which bear their names, and they offer proofs from the branch of learning which each one of these men pursued, arguing that all the things for which they were admired among the Greeks were transferred from Egypt.,4.  Orpheus, for instance, brought from Egypt most of his mystic ceremonies, the orgiastic rites that accompanied his wanderings, and his fabulous account of his experiences in Hades.,5.  For the rite of Osiris is the same as that of Dionysus and that of Isis very similar to that of Demeter, the names alone having been interchanged; and the punishments in Hades of the unrighteous, the Fields of the Righteous, and the fantastic conceptions, current among the many, which are figments of the imagination — all these were introduced by Orpheus in imitation of the Egyptian funeral customs.,6.  Hermes, for instance, the Conductor of Souls, according to the ancient Egyptian custom, brings up the body of the Apis to a certain point and then gives it over to one who wears the mask of Cerberus. And after Orpheus had introduced this notion among the Greeks, Homer followed it when he wrote: Cyllenian Hermes then did summon forth The suitors's souls, holding his wand in hand. And again a little further on he says: They passed Oceanus' streams, the Gleaming Rock, The Portals of the Sun, the Land of Dreams; And now they reached the Meadow of Asphodel, Where dwell the Souls, the shades of men outworn.,7.  Now he calls the river "Oceanus" because in their language the Egyptians speak of the Nile as Oceanus; the "Portals of the Sun" (Heliopulai) is his name for the city of Heliopolis; and "Meadows," the mythical dwelling of the dead, is his term for the place near the lake which is called Acherousia, which is near Memphis, and around it are fairest meadows, of a marsh-land and lotus and reeds. The same explanation also serves for the statement that the dwelling of the dead is in these regions, since the most and the largest tombs of the Egyptians are situated there, the dead being ferried across both the river and Lake Acherousia and their bodies laid in the vaults situated there.,8.  The other myths about Hades, current among the Greeks, also agree with the customs which are practised even now in Egypt. For the boat which receives the bodies is called baris, and the passenger's fee is given to the boatman, who in the Egyptian tongue is called charon.,9.  And near these regions, they say, are also the "Shades," which is a temple of Hecate, and "portals" of Cocytus and Lethe, which are covered at intervals with bands of bronze. There are, moreover, other portals, namely, those of Truth, and near them stands a headless statue of Justice. 5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
13. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 14.2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 164 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 4.1160 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.71 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.10. And on this account Plato, and even before his time the Pythagoreians, called philosophy music; and they say that the universe is constituted in accordance with harmony, assuming that every form of music is the work of the gods. And in this sense, also, the Muses are goddesses, and Apollo is leader of the Muses, and poetry as a whole is laudatory of the gods. And by the same course of reasoning they also attribute to music the upbuilding of morals, believing that everything which tends to correct the mind is close to the gods. Now most of the Greeks assigned to Dionysus, Apollo, Hecate, the Muses, and above all to Demeter, everything of an orgiastic or Bacchic or choral nature, as well as the mystic element in initiations; and they give the name Iacchus not only to Dionysus but also to the leader-in-chief of the mysteries, who is the genius of Demeter. And branch-bearing, choral dancing, and initiations are common elements in the worship of these gods. As for the Muses and Apollo, the Muses preside over the choruses, whereas Apollo presides both over these and the rites of divination. But all educated men, and especially the musicians, are ministers of the Muses; and both these and those who have to do with divination are ministers of Apollo; and the initiated and torch-bearers and hierophants, of Demeter; and the Sileni and Satyri and Bacchae, and also the Lenae and Thyiae and Mimallones and Naides and Nymphae and the beings called Tityri, of Dionysus.
18. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.14.1, 3.14.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.14.1. Κέκροψ αὐτόχθων, συμφυὲς ἔχων σῶμα ἀνδρὸς καὶ δράκοντος, τῆς Ἀττικῆς ἐβασίλευσε πρῶτος, καὶ τὴν γῆν πρότερον λεγομένην Ἀκτὴν ἀφʼ ἑαυτοῦ Κεκροπίαν ὠνόμασεν. ἐπὶ τούτου, φασίν, ἔδοξε τοῖς θεοῖς πόλεις καταλαβέσθαι, ἐν αἷς ἔμελλον ἔχειν τιμὰς ἰδίας ἕκαστος. ἧκεν οὖν πρῶτος Ποσειδῶν ἐπὶ τὴν Ἀττικήν, καὶ πλήξας τῇ τριαίνῃ κατὰ μέσην τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ἀπέφηνε θάλασσαν, ἣν νῦν Ἐρεχθηίδα καλοῦσι. μετὰ δὲ τοῦτον ἧκεν Ἀθηνᾶ, καὶ ποιησαμένη τῆς καταλήψεως Κέκροπα μάρτυρα ἐφύτευσεν ἐλαίαν, ἣ νῦν ἐν τῷ Πανδροσείῳ 1 -- δείκνυται. γενομένης δὲ ἔριδος ἀμφοῖν περὶ τῆς χώρας, διαλύσας Ζεὺς κριτὰς ἔδωκεν, 1 -- οὐχ ὡς εἶπόν τινες, Κέκροπα καὶ Κραναόν, 2 -- οὐδὲ Ἐρυσίχθονα, θεοὺς δὲ τοὺς δώδεκα. καὶ τούτων δικαζόντων ἡ χώρα τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ἐκρίθη, Κέκροπος μαρτυρήσαντος ὅτι πρώτη 3 -- τὴν ἐλαίαν ἐφύτευσεν. Ἀθηνᾶ μὲν οὖν ἀφʼ ἑαυτῆς τὴν πόλιν ἐκάλεσεν Ἀθήνας, Ποσειδῶν δὲ θυμῷ ὀργισθεὶς τὸ Θριάσιον πεδίον ἐπέκλυσε καὶ τὴν Ἀττικὴν ὕφαλον ἐποίησε. 3.14.6. Κραναὸν δὲ ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύων ἐβασίλευσε· τοῦτον ἔνιοι μὲν Δευκαλίωνος, ἔνιοι δὲ αὐτόχθονα 3 -- λέγουσι. βασιλεύσαντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἔτη 4 -- δώδεκα Ἐριχθόνιος ἐκβάλλει. τοῦτον οἱ μὲν Ἡφαίστου καὶ τῆς Κραναοῦ θυγατρὸς Ἀτθίδος εἶναι λέγουσιν, οἱ δὲ Ἡφαίστου καὶ Ἀθηνᾶς, οὕτως· Ἀθηνᾶ παρεγένετο πρὸς Ἥφαιστον, ὅπλα κατασκευάσαι θέλουσα. ὁ δὲ ἐγκαταλελειμμένος 5 -- ὑπὸ Ἀφροδίτης εἰς ἐπιθυμίαν ὤλισθε τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, καὶ διώκειν αὐτὴν ἤρξατο· ἡ δὲ ἔφευγεν. ὡς δὲ ἐγγὺς αὐτῆς ἐγένετο πολλῇ ἀνάγκῃ (ἦν γὰρ χωλός), ἐπειρᾶτο συνελθεῖν. ἡ δὲ ὡς σώφρων καὶ παρθένος οὖσα οὐκ ἠνέσχετο· ὁ δὲ ἀπεσπέρμηνεν εἰς τὸ σκέλος τῆς θεᾶς. ἐκείνη δὲ μυσαχθεῖσα ἐρίῳ ἀπομάξασα τὸν γόνον εἰς γῆν ἔρριψε. φευγούσης δὲ αὐτῆς καὶ τῆς γονῆς εἰς γῆν πεσούσης Ἐριχθόνιος γίνεται. τοῦτον Ἀθηνᾶ κρύφα τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν ἔτρεφεν, ἀθάνατον θέλουσα ποιῆσαι· καὶ καταθεῖσα αὐτὸν εἰς κίστην Πανδρόσῳ τῇ Κέκροπος παρακατέθετο, ἀπειποῦσα τὴν κίστην ἀνοίγειν. αἱ δὲ ἀδελφαὶ τῆς Πανδρόσου ἀνοίγουσιν ὑπὸ περιεργίας, καὶ θεῶνται τῷ βρέφει παρεσπειραμένον δράκοντα· καὶ ὡς μὲν ἔνιοι λέγουσιν, ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ διεφθάρησαν τοῦ δράκοντος, ὡς δὲ ἔνιοι, διʼ ὀργὴν Ἀθηνᾶς ἐμμανεῖς γενόμεναι κατὰ τῆς ἀκροπόλεως αὑτὰς ἔρριψαν. ἐν δὲ τῷ τεμένει τραφεὶς Ἐριχθόνιος ὑπʼ αὐτῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύονα ἐβασίλευσεν Ἀθηνῶν, καὶ τὸ ἐν ἀκροπόλει ξόανον τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ἱδρύσατο, καὶ τῶν Παναθηναίων τὴν ἑορτὴν συνεστήσατο, καὶ Πραξιθέαν 1 -- νηίδα νύμφην ἔγημεν, ἐξ ἧς αὐτῷ παῖς Πανδίων ἐγεννήθη.
19. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 2.16.3 (1st cent. CE

2.16.3. ὅτι τῶν δώδεκα θεῶν Ἡρακλέα ἄγουσιν Αἰγύπτιοι, καθάπερ καὶ Ἀθηναῖοι Διόνυσον τὸν Διὸς καὶ Κόρης σέβουσιν, ἄλλον τοῦτον Διόνυσον· καὶ ὁ Ἴακχος ὁ μυστικὸς τούτῳ Διονύσῳ, οὐχὶ τῷ Θηβαίῳ, ἐπᾴδεται.
20. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32.60 (1st cent. CE

32.60.  Surely it is not the Spartans you are imitating, is it? It is said, you know, that in olden days they made war to the accompaniment of the pipe; but your warfare is to the accompaniment of the harp. Or do you desire — for I myself have compared king with commons do you, I ask, desire to be thought afflicted with the same disease as Nero? Why, not even he profited by his intimate acquaintance with music and his devotion to it. And how much better it would be to imitate the present ruler in his devotion to culture and reason! Will you not discard that disgraceful and immoderate craving for notoriety? Will you not be cautious about poking fun at everybody else, and, what is more, before persons who, if I may say so, have nothing great or wonder­ful to boast of?
21. Plutarch, Consolation To His Wife, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

611d. when they reach the point where the want is no longer felt; and your Timoxena has been deprived of little, for what she knew was little, and her pleasure was in little things; and as for those things of which she had acquired no perception, which she had never conceived, and to which she had never given thought, how could she be said to be deprived of them? Furthermore, Iknow that you are kept from believing the statements of that other set, who win many to their way of thinking when they say that nothing is in any way evil or painful to "what has undergone dissolution," by the teaching of our fathers and by the mystic formulas of Dionysiac rites, the knowledge of which we who are participants share with each other. Consider then that the soul, which is imperishable
22. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea ? For you are ii t the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. Cf. Diodorus, i. 11. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull A partial list in Roscher, Lexikon d. gr. u. röm. Mythologie, i. 1149. ; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull Cf. Moralia, 299 a, where the invocation is given at greater length; also Edmonds, Lyra Graeca, iii. p. 510 (L.C.L.). ; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is Son of the Bull. They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, Cf. Moralia, 671 e. at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates Müller, Frag. Hist. Graec. iv. p. 498, Socrates, no. 5. has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, 358 a and 359 a, supra . point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus That is, the inspired maidens, mentioned at the beginning of the chapter. wake the God of the Mystic Basket. Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter (vi.), 127; Anth. Pal. vi. 165; Virgil, Georg. i. 166. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar Frag. 153 (Christ). Plutarch quotes the line also in Moralia, 745 a and 757 f. be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest-time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water. 35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea? For you are at the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is "Son of the Bull." They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus wake the God of the Mystic Basket. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water.
24. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.17.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Lucian, The Dance, 59, 54 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.2.6, 1.5.3, 1.14.6, 1.27.2, 8.37.5, 10.4.3, 10.32.2, 10.32.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.5.3. I saw also among the eponymoi statues of Cecrops and Pandion, but I do not know who of those names are thus honored. For there was an earlier ruler Cecrops who took to wife the daughter of Actaeus, and a later—he it was who migrated to Euboea—son of Erechtheus, son of Pandion, son of Erichthonius. And there was a king Pandion who was son of Erichthonius, and another who was son of Cecrops the second. This man was deposed from his kingdom by the Metionidae, and when he fled to Megara —for he had to wife the daughter of Pylas king of Megara—his children were banished with him. And Pandion is said to have fallen ill there and died, and on the coast of the Megarid is his tomb, on the rock called the rock of Athena the Gannet. 1.14.6. Above the Cerameicus and the portico called the King's Portico is a temple of Hephaestus. I was not surprised that by it stands a statue of Athena, be cause I knew the story about Erichthonius. But when I saw that the statue of Athena had blue eyes I found out that the legend about them is Libyan. For the Libyans have a saying that the Goddess is the daughter of Poseidon and Lake Tritonis, and for this reason has blue eyes like Poseidon. 1.27.2. About the olive they have nothing to say except that it was testimony the goddess produced when she contended for their land. Legend also says that when the Persians fired Athens the olive was burnt down, but on the very day it was burnt it grew again to the height of two cubits. Adjoining the temple of Athena is the temple of Pandrosus, the only one of the sisters to be faithful to the trust. 8.37.5. By the image of the Mistress stands Anytus, represented as a man in armour. Those about the sanctuary say that the Mistress was brought up by Anytus, who was one of the Titans, as they are called. The first to introduce Titans into poetry was Homer, See Hom. Il. 14.279 . representing them as gods down in what is called Tartarus; the lines are in the passage about Hera's oath. From Homer the name of the Titans was taken by Onomacritus, who in the orgies he composed for Dionysus made the Titans the authors of the god's sufferings. 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads. 10.32.2. On the way from Delphi to the summit of Parnassus, about sixty stades distant from Delphi, there is a bronze image. The ascent to the Corycian cave is easier for an active walker than it is for mules or horses. I mentioned a little earlier in my narrative See Paus. 10.6.3 . that this cave was named after a nymph called Corycia, and of all the caves I have ever seen this seemed to me the best worth seeing. 10.32.7. But the Corycian cave exceeds in size those I have mentioned, and it is possible to make one's way through the greater part of it even without lights. The roof stands at a sufficient height from the floor, and water, rising in part from springs but still more dripping from the roof, has made clearly visible the marks of drops on the floor throughout the cave. The dwellers around Parnassus believe it to be sacred to the Corycian nymphs, and especially to Pan. From the Corycian cave it is difficult even for an active walker to reach the heights of Parnassus . The heights are above the clouds, and the Thyiad women rave there in honor of Dionysus and Apollo.
28. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

29. Origen, Against Celsus, 4.17 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.17. But will not those narratives, especially when they are understood in their proper sense, appear far more worthy of respect than the story that Dionysus was deceived by the Titans, and expelled from the throne of Jupiter, and torn in pieces by them, and his remains being afterwards put together again, he returned as it were once more to life, and ascended to heaven? Or are the Greeks at liberty to refer such stories to the doctrine of the soul, and to interpret them figuratively, while the door of a consistent explanation, and one everywhere in accord and harmony with the writings of the Divine Spirit, who had His abode in pure souls, is closed against us? Celsus, then, is altogether ignorant of the purpose of our writings, and it is therefore upon his own acceptation of them that he casts discredit, and not upon their real meaning; whereas, if he had reflected on what is appropriate to a soul which is to enjoy an everlasting life, and on the opinion which we are to form of its essence and principles, he would not so have ridiculed the entrance of the immortal into a mortal body, which took place not according to the metempsychosis of Plato, but agreeably to another and higher view of things. And he would have observed one descent, distinguished by its great benevolence, undertaken to convert (as the Scripture mystically terms them) the lost sheep of the house of Israel, which had strayed down from the mountains, and to which the Shepherd is said in certain parables to have gone down, leaving on the mountains those which had not strayed.
30. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

31. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

32. Servius, In Vergilii Georgicon Libros, 1.166 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

33. Proclus, Hymni, 7.11-7.15 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

34. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 585, 311



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aigeus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 280
archegetes ἀρχηγέτης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
assimilation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 279
athens Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
autocrats/autocracy see also dionysus, monarchy, satyrplay, tragedy, tyrants\n, and theatre Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 112
awakening, dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
berezan Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
boukolos βουκόλος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
cave, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
choregos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
cilla Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
claques Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 112
corycia, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 279, 280
cymbals ῥόπτρον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, dionysos as bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
dionysos, dionysos boukeros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
dionysos, dionysos lenaios/lenaeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, dionysos polyonymos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
dionysos, orphic dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
dionysos, rebirth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, tomb Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 279, 280
dionysus, heart of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
eponymous hero, king Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erechtheus, as father Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erechtheus, descendant of erichthonios Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erechtheus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
erichthonios, and athena Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erichthonios, and erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erichthonios, birth Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erichthonios, father of pandion Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erichthonios, founder of athenian royal house Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
erysichthon Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
euergetism Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 112
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
hephaistos Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
herodotus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
herois, heroides Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
iacche ἴακχε Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 279, 280
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
ionia, ionian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
kekrops, at birth of erichthonios Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
kekrops, founder of athenian royal house Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
kekrops Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
kore Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
kreousa, child of erechtheus Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
liknon λίκνον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
logos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
lucian (writer)\n, on dance Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 112
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
martyria (of strife for attica) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
mysteries, phlyan Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
mystes μύστης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279, 280
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
olbia/pontic olbia, olbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
orgiasmos ὀργιασμός Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 280
pallas, king Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
pandion, king Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 67
pantomimes, excluded from greek festivals Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 112
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
perinthus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
poseidon Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 280
rose, h. j. Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
sacrifice, sacrificial Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
satyrs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
simonides Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
sparagmós σπαραγμός Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
strife (for attica) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 186
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
thurii Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 279
torre nova Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280
trieteric festivals Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
tympanon τύμπανον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 279
zeus, gestates dionysus in his thigh Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 280