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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7494
Lucian, Sacrifices, 14


nanBut all this, and all that Assyria, Phrygia, and Lydia can show, amounts to nothing much. If you would see the Gods in their glory, fit denizens of Heaven, you must go to Egypt. There you will find that Zeus has sprouted ram's horns, our old friend Hermes has the muzzle of a dog, and Pan is perfect goat; ibis, crocodile, ape, — each is a God in disguise. And wouldst thou know the truth that lurks herein? If so, you will find no lack of sages and scribes and shaven priests to inform you (after expulsion of the profanum vulgus) how, when the Giants and their other enemies rose against them, the Gods fled to Egypt to hide themselves, and there took the form of goat and ram, of bird and reptile, which forms they preserve to this day. Of all this they have documentary evidence, dating from thousands of years back, stored up in their temples.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 854-858, 853 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

853. From under earth a branch of Ocean flows:
2. Herodotus, Histories, 3.24 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.24. Last after this they viewed the Ethiopian coffins; these are said to be made of alabaster, as I shall describe: ,they cause the dead body to shrink, either as the Egyptians do or in some other way, then cover it with gypsum and paint it all as far as possible in the likeness of the living man; ,then they set it within a hollow pillar of alabaster, which they dig in abundance from the ground, and it is easily worked; the body can be seen in the pillar through the alabaster, no evil stench nor anything unpleasant proceeding from it, and showing clearly all its parts, as if it were the man himself. ,The nearest of kin keep the pillar in their house for a year, giving it of the first-fruits and offering it sacrifices; after which they bring the pillars out and set them round about the city.
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.14. 1.  After this she visited Persis and every other country over which she ruled throughout Asia. Everywhere she cut through the mountains and the precipitous cliffs and constructed expensive roads, while on the plains she made mounds, sometimes constructing them as tombs for those of her generals who died, and sometimes founding cities on their tops.,2.  And it was also her custom, whenever she made camp, to build little mounds, upon which setting her tent she could look down upon all the encampment. As a consequence many of the works she built throughout Asia remain to this day and are called Works of Semiramis.,3.  After this she visited all Egypt, and after subduing most of Libya she went also to the oracle of Ammon to inquire of the god regarding her own end. And the account runs that the answer was given her that she would disappear from among men and receive undying honour among some of the peoples of Asia, and that this would take place when her son Ninyas should conspire against her.,4.  Then upon her return from these regions she visited most of Ethiopia, subduing it as she went and inspecting the wonders of the land. For in that country, they say, there is a lake, square in form, with a perimeter of some hundred and sixty feet, and its water is like cinnabar in colour and the odour of it is exceedingly sweet, not unlike that of old wine; moreover, it has a remarkable power; for whoever has drunk of it, they say, falls into a frenzy and accuses himself of every sin which he had formerly committed in secret. However, a man may not readily agree with those who tell such things.
4. Horace, Odes, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan.
5. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 152.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.830 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5.319-5.320, 5.341-5.355 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Lucian, On Mourning, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. But all this lamentation, now; this fluting and beating of breasts; these wholly disproportionate wailings: how am I the better for it all? And what do I want with a garlanded column over my grave? And what good do you suppose you are going to do by pouring wine on it? do you expect it to filter through all the way to Hades? As to the victims, you must surely see for yourselves that all the solid nutriment is whisked away heavenwards in the form of smoke, leaving us Shades precisely as we were; the residue, being dust, is useless; or is it your theory that Shades batten on ashes? Pluto’s realm is not so barren, nor asphodel so scarce with us, that we must apply to you for provisions.— What with this winding sheet and these woollen bandages, my jaws have been effectually sealed up, or, by Tisiphone, I should have burst out laughing long before this at the stuff you talk and the things you do.’
10. Lucian, Sacrifices, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 29 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneid (vergil) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
aetiology Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
allusion, togigantomachy Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
animals, egyptian iconography and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
animals, horses Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
animals, olympians as humiliated by assuming animal forms Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
artemis Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
audience, confrontation of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
burial practices Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
burial urns, cremation Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
calliope, gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
cult of the dead Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
de sacrifiis (lucian) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
death, untimely death Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
emathides, as learned poets Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
emathides, gigantomachy deployed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
emathides, subversive use of genre by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
emathides and anti-encomium Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
epicurus , epicureanism Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
fabulae (hyginus) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
family, parent-child, and death Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
feast, commemorative Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
georgics (vergil) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
gigantomachy, as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
gigantomachy, athena and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
gigantomachy, emathides and subversion of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
gigantomachy, jupiter and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
hades, underworld Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
hyginus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
jupiter (zeus), gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
jupiter (zeus), ovids characterizations of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
jupiter (zeus), transformation into dux gregis Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
lamentation Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
libation Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
lucian Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
lucian of samosata Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
minerva (athena), as tyrannical olympian power Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
minerva (athena), in gigantomachy Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
mount helicon Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
mourning Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
nicander Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
olympians, humiliation and transformations of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
pindar Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
politics, gigantomachy as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
post-mortality belief, representation of, egyptian context Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
prosodia (pindar) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
recusationes Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61
rituals, funerary Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
sacrifice' Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
scythians Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
tatian Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 74
transformations, as humiliation of olympians Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
transformations, into animals Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 60, 61
vergil, gigantomachy as deployed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 61