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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7516
Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 86


nanHERMOTIMUS: You are quite right. And now I will be off to metamorphose myself. When we next meet, there will be no long, shaggy beard, no artificial composure; I shall be natural, as a gentleman should. I may go as far as a fashionable coat, by way of publishing my renunciation of nonsense. I only wish there were an emetic that would purge out every doctrine they have instilled into me; I assure you, if I could reverse Chrysippus's plan with the hellebore, and drink forgetfulness, not of the world but of Stoicism, I would not think twice about it. Well, Lycinus, I owe you a debt indeed; I was being swept along in a rough turbid torrent, unresisting, drifting with the stream; when lo, you stood there and fished me out, a true deus ex machina. I have good enough reason, I think, to shave my head like the people who get clear off from a wreck; for I am to make votive offerings today for the dispersion of that thick cloud which was over my eyes. Henceforth, if I meet a philosopher on my walks (and it will not be with my will), I shall turn aside and avoid him as I would a mad dog.END


nanHer . You are quite right. And now I will be off to metamorphose myself. When we next meet, there will be no long, shaggy beard, no artificial composure; I shall be natural, as a gentleman should. I may go as far as a fashionable coat, by way of publishing my renunciation of nonsense. I only wish there were an emetic that would purge out every doctrine they have instilled into me; I assure you, if I could reverse Chrysippus's plan with the hellebore, and drink forgetfulness, not of the world but of Stoicism, I would not think twice about it. Well, Lycinus, I owe you a debt indeed; I was being swept along in a rough turbid torrent, unresisting, drifting with the stream; when lo, you stood there and fished me out, a true deus ex machina. I have good enough reason, I think, to shave my head like the people who get clear off from a wreck; for I am to make votive offerings today for the dispersion of that thick cloud which was over my eyes. Henceforth, if I meet a philosopher on my walks (and it will not be with my will), I shall turn aside and avoid him as I would a mad dog.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

40 results
1. Anaximenes of Lampsacus, Rhetoric To Alexander, 11 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.109, 13.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Demetrius, Style, 285, 38, 52, 283 (1st cent. BCE

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.171-2.175 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.171. and hid himself, refusing to bring forth 2.172. His word of guile, and name what wretch should die. 2.173. At last, reluctant, and all loudly urged 2.174. By false Ulysses, he fulfils their plot 2.175. and, lifting up his voice oracular
5. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.108 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Juvenal, Satires, 4.20, 5.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Martial, Epigrams, 10.96 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Martial, Epigrams, 10.96 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 15.4, 32.2, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 15.4, 32.2, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.6, 34.48, 34.62, 37.82 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 61.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Suetonius, Augustus, 70.2, 72.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Suetonius, Caligula, 57.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Iulius, 79.1, 80.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Suetonius, Nero, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Tiberius, 44.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Tacitus, Annals, 12.49, 15.34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.49.  The procurator of Cappadocia was Julius Paelignus, a person made doubly contemptible by hebetude of mind and grotesqueness of body, yet on terms of the greatest intimacy with Claudius during the years of retirement when he amused his sluggish leisure with the society of buffoons. The Paelignus had mustered the provincial militia, with the avowed intention of recovering Armenia; but, while he was plundering our subjects in preference to the enemy, the secession of his troops left him defenceless against the barbarian incursions, and he made his way to Radamistus, by whose liberality he was so overpowered that he voluntarily advised him to assume the kingly emblem, and assisted at its assumption in the quality of sponsor and satellite. Ugly reports of the incident spread; and, to make it clear that not all Romans were to be judged by the standard of Paelignus, the legate Helvidius Priscus was sent with a legion to deal with the disturbed situation as the circumstances might require. Accordingly, after crossing Mount Taurus in haste, he had settled more points by moderation than by force, when he was ordered back to Syria, lest he should give occasion for a Parthian war. 15.34.  There an incident took place, sinister in the eyes of many, providential and a mark of divine favour in those of the sovereign; for, after the audience had left, the theatre, now empty, collapsed without injury to anyone. Therefore, celebrating in a set of verses his gratitude to Heaven, Nero — now bent on crossing the Adriatic — came to rest for the moment at Beneventum; where a largely attended gladiatorial spectacle was being exhibited by Vatinius. Vatinius ranked among the foulest prodigies of that court; the product of a shoemaker's shop, endowed with a misshapen body and a scurrile wit, he had been adopted at the outset as a target for buffoonery; then, by calumniating every man of decency, he acquired a power which made him in influence, in wealth, and in capacity for harm, pre-eminent even among villains.
20. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.9.2, 55.9.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44.9.2.  When he kept refusing the title and rebuking in a way those who thus accosted him, yet did nothing by which it would be thought that he was really displeased at it, they secretly adorned his statue, which stood on the rostra, with a diadem. 55.9.6.  He made the journey as a private citizen, though he exercised his authority by compelling the Parians to sell him the statue of Vesta, in order that it might be placed in the temple of Concord; and when he reached Rhodes, he refrained from haughty conduct in both word and deed.
21. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Hermogenes, Rhetorical Exercises, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Lucian, Apology, 13, 15, 12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Lucian, The Double Indictment, 33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33. Just. And that one a rhetorician’s, I suppose. Dialogue will now address the same jury. Gentlemen, you will remain and hear this second case, and will receive a double fee.Dia. If I had had my choice, gentlemen, I should have addressed you in the conversational style to which I am accustomed, instead of delivering a long harangue. However, I must conform to the custom of the law courts, though I have neither skill nor experience in such matters. So much by way of exordium: and now for the outrage committed on me by the defendant. In former days, gentlemen, I was a person of exalted character: my speculations turned upon the Gods, and Nature, and the Annus Magnus; I trod those aerial plains wherein Zeus on winged car is borne along through the heights. My flight had actually brought me to the heavenly vault; I was just setting foot upon the upper surface of that dome, when this Syrian took it upon himself to drag me down, break my wings, and reduce me to the common level of humanity. Whisking off the seemly tragic mask I then wore, he clapped on in its place a comic one that was little short of ludicrous: his next step was to huddle me into a corner with Jest, Lampoon, Cynicism, and the comedians Eupolis and Aristophanes, persons with a horrible knack of making light of sacred things, and girding at all that is as it should be. But the climax was reached when he unearthed a barking, snarling old Cynic, Menippus by name, and thrust his company upon me; a grim bulldog, if ever there was one; a treacherous brute that will snap at you while his tail is yet wagging. Could any man be more abominably misused? Stripped of my proper attire, I am made to play the buffoon, and to give expression to every whimsical absurdity that his caprice dictates. And, as if that were not preposterous enough, he has forbidden me either to walk on my feet or to rise on the wings of poesy: I am a ridiculous cross between prose and verse; a monster of incongruity; a literary Centaur.
25. Lucian, Salaried Posts In Great Houses, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 37, 26 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Lucian, Demonax, 5, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Lucian, The Dipsads, 6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Lucian, The Runaways, 14-15, 20, 3-4, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. My followers would have restrained them, and exposed their errors: but they grew angry, and conspired against them, and in the end brought them under the power of the law, which condemned them to drink of hemlock. Doubtless I should have done well to renounce humanity there and then, and take my flight: but Antisthenes and Diogenes, and after them Crates, and our friend Menippus, prevailed upon me to tarry yet a little longer. Would that I had never yielded! I should have been spared much pain in the sequel.
30. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 47, 77, 84-85, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Ly . A glorious prize, indeed! however, you cannot be far off it now, if one may judge by the time you have given to philosophy, and the extraordinary vigour of your long pursuit. For twenty years now, I should say, I have watched you perpetually going to your professors, generally bent over a book taking notes of past lectures, pale with thought and emaciated in body. I suspect you find no release even in your dreams, you are so wrapped up in the thing. With all this you must surely get hold of Happiness soon, if indeed you have not found it long ago without telling us.Her . Alas, Lycinus, I am only just beginning to get an inkling of the right way. Very far off dwells Virtue, as Hesiod says, and long and steep and rough is the way thither, and travellers must bedew it with sweat.Ly . And you have not yet sweated and travelled enough?Her . Surely not; else should I have been on the summit, with nothing left between me and bliss; but I am only starting yet, Lycinus.
31. Lucian, Nigrinus, 2, 37-38, 18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Thus reasoning, I withdrew myself out of range, as Zeus did Hector,Far from the scene of slaughter, blood and strife,and resolved henceforth to keep my house. I lead the life you see — a spiritless, womanish life, most men would account it — holding converse with Philosophy, with Plato, with Truth. From my high seat in this vast theatre, I look down on the scene beneath me; a scene calculated to afford much entertainment; calculated also to try a man’s resolution to the utmost.
32. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 27 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

33. Lucian, The Carousal, Or The Lapiths, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Most of them took these in good part; but when it came to Alcidamas's turn, and he called him a Maltese poodle. Alcidamas, who had shown signs of jealousy for some time and did not at all like the way he was holding everyone's attention, lost his temper. He threw off his cloak and challenged the fellow to a bout of pancratium; otherwise he would let him feel his stick. So poor Satyrion, as the jester was called, had to accept the challenge and stand up. A charming spectacle–the philosopher sparring and exchanging blows with a buffoon! Some of us were scandalized and some amused, till Alcidamas found he had his bellyful, being no match for the tough little fellow. They gave us a good laugh.
34. Lucian, Philosophies For Sale, 23, 7, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.7 (2nd cent. CE

1.7. ON reaching the age when children are taught their letters, he showed great strength of memory and power of application; and his tongue affected the Attic dialect, nor was his accent corrupted by the race he lived among. All eyes were turned upon him, for he was, moreover, conspicuous for his beauty. When he reached his fourteenth year, his father brought him to Tarsus, to Euthydemus the teacher from Phoenicia. Now Euthydemus was a good rhetor, and began his education; but, though he was attached to his teacher, he found the atmosphere of the city harsh and strange and little conducive to the philosophic life, for nowhere are men more addicted than here to luxury; jesters and full of insolence are they all; and they attend more to their fine linen than the Athenians did to wisdom; and a stream called the Cydnus runs through their city, along the banks of which they sit like so many water-fowl. Hence the words which Apollonius addresses to them in his letter: Be done with getting drunk upon your water. He therefore transferred his teacher, with his father's consent, to the town of Aegae, which was close by, where he found a peace congenial to one who would be a philosopher, and a more serious school of study and a sanctuary of Asclepius, where that god reveals himself in person to men. There he had as his companions in philosophy followers of Plato and Chrysippus and peripatetic philosophers. And he diligently attended also to the discourses of Epicurus, for he did not despise these either, although it was to those of Pythagoras that he applied himself with unspeakable wisdom and ardor. However, his teacher of the Pythagorean system was not a very serious person, nor one who practiced in his conduct the philosophy he taught; for he was the slave of his belly and appetites, and modeled himself upon Epicurus. And this man was Euxenus from the town of Heraclea in Pontus, and he knew the principles of Pythagoras just as birds know what they learn from men; for the birds will wish you farewell, and say Good day or Zeus help you, and such like, without understanding what they say and without any real sympathy for mankind, merely because they have been trained to move their tongue in a certain manner. Apollonius, however, was like the young eagles who, as long as they are not fully fledged, fly alongside of their parents and are trained by them in flight, but who, as soon as they are able to rise in the air, outsoar the parent birds, especially when they perceive the latter to be greedy and to be flying along the ground in order to snuff the quarry; like them Apollonius attended Euxenus as long as he was a child and was guided by him in the path of argument, but when he reached his sixteenth year he indulged his impulse towards the life of Pythagoras, being fledged and winged thereto by some higher power. Notwithstanding he did not cease to love Euxenus, nay, he persuaded his father to present him with a villa outside the town, where there were tender groves and fountains, and he said to him: Now you live there your own life, but I will live that of Pythagoras.
36. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 527 (2nd cent. CE

37. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 4.16-4.17, 4.19-4.20, 6.104, 7.121 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.16. 3. POLEMOPolemo, the son of Philostratus, was an Athenian who belonged to the deme of Oea. In his youth he was so profligate and dissipated that he actually carried about with him money to procure the immediate gratification of his desires, and would even keep sums concealed in lanes and alleys. Even in the Academy a piece of three obols was found close to a pillar, where he had buried it for the same purpose. And one day, by agreement with his young friends, he burst into the school of Xenocrates quite drunk, with a garland on his head. Xenocrates, however, without being at all disturbed, went on with his discourse as before, the subject being temperance. The lad, as he listened, by degrees was taken in the toils. He became so industrious as to surpass all the other scholars, and rose to be himself head of the school in the 116th Olympiad. 4.17. Antigonus of Carystus in his Biographies says that his father was foremost among the citizens and kept horses to compete in the chariot-race; that Polemo himself had been defendant in an action brought by his wife, who charged him with cruelty owing to the irregularities of his life; but that, from the time when he began to study philosophy, he acquired such strength of character as always to maintain the same unruffled calm of demeanour. Nay more, he never lost control of his voice. This in fact accounts for the fascination which he exercised over Crantor. Certain it is that, when a mad dog bit him in the back of his thigh, he did not even turn pale, but remained undisturbed by all the clamour which arose in the city at the news of what had happened. In the theatre too he was singularly unmoved. 4.19. which, as the same author says, is strong seasoning for meat when it is high. Further, he would not, they say, even sit down to deal with the themes of his pupils, but would argue walking up and down. It was, then, for his love of what is noble that he was honoured in the state. Nevertheless would he withdraw from society and confine himself to the Garden of the Academy, while close by his scholars made themselves little huts and lived not far from the shrine of the Muses and the lecture-hall. It would seem that in all respects Polemo emulated Xenocrates. And Aristippus in the fourth book of his work On the Luxury of the Ancients affirms him to have been his favourite. Certainly he always kept his predecessor before his mind and, like him, wore that simple austere dignity which is proper to the Dorian mode. 4.20. He loved Sophocles, particularly in those passages where it seemed as if, in the phrase of the comic poet,A stout Molossian mastiff lent him aid,and where the poet was, in the words of Phrynichus,Nor must, nor blended vintage, but true Pramnian.Thus he would call Homer the Sophocles of epic, and Sophocles the Homer of tragedyHe died at an advanced age of gradual decay, leaving behind him a considerable number of works. I have composed the following epigram upon him:Dost thou not hear? We have buried Polemo, laid here by that fatal scourge of wasted strength. Yet not Polemo, but merely his body, which on his way to the stars he left to moulder in the ground. 6.104. So they get rid of geometry and music and all such studies. Anyhow, when somebody showed Diogenes a clock, he pronounced it a serviceable instrument to save one from being late for dinner. Again, to a man who gave a musical recital before him he said:By men's minds states are ordered well, and households,Not by the lyre's twanged strings or flute's trilled notes.They hold further that Life according to Virtue is the End to be sought, as Antisthenes says in his Heracles: exactly like the Stoics. For indeed there is a certain close relationship between the two schools. Hence it has been said that Cynicism is a short cut to virtue; and after the same pattern did Zeno of Citium live his life. 7.121. But Heraclides of Tarsus, who was the disciple of Antipater of Tarsus, and Athenodorus both assert that sins are not equal.Again, the Stoics say that the wise man will take part in politics, if nothing hinders him – so, for instance, Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Various Types of Life – since thus he will restrain vice and promote virtue. Also (they maintain) he will marry, as Zeno says in his Republic, and beget children. Moreover, they say that the wise man will never form mere opinions, that is to say, he will never give assent to anything that is false; that he will also play the Cynic, Cynicism being a short cut to virtue, as Apollodorus calls it in his Ethics; that he will even turn cannibal under stress of circumstances. They declare that he alone is free and bad men are slaves, freedom being power of independent action, whereas slavery is privation of the same;
38. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.50 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.50. But let us see what those statements of his are which follow next in these words: Nay, we see, indeed, that even those individuals, who in the market-places perform the most disgraceful tricks, and who gather crowds around them, would never approach an assembly of wise men, nor dare to exhibit their arts among them; but wherever they see young men, and a mob of slaves, and a gathering of unintelligent persons, there they thrust themselves in, and show themselves off. Observe, now, how he slanders us in these words, comparing us to those who in the market-places perform the most disreputable tricks, and gather crowds around them! What disreputable tricks, pray, do we perform? Or what is there in our conduct that resembles theirs, seeing that by means of readings, and explanations of the things read, we lead men to the worship of the God of the universe, and to the cognate virtues, and turn them away from contemning Deity, and from all things contrary to right reason? Philosophers verily would wish to collect together such hearers of their discourses as exhort men to virtue - a practice which certain of the Cynics especially have followed, who converse publicly with those whom they happen to meet. Will they maintain, then, that these who do not gather together persons who are considered to have been educated, but who invite and assemble hearers from the public street, resemble those who in the market-places perform the most disreputable tricks, and gather crowds around them? Neither Celsus, however, nor any one who holds the same opinions, will blame those who, agreeably to what they regard as a feeling of philanthropy, address their arguments to the ignorant populace.
39. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 20 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

40. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 1.720 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
alba longa, war with rome Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
ancus marcius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
animal, dog Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278, 280, 282
antony, marc, proscribes verres Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
antony, marc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
apelles, the lineum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
apollonius of tyana Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
art, sculpture Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
augustus, fond of corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
augustus, private collection of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
augustus, villa on capri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
baldness and shaven heads Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83
citizenship Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260, 280
clothing Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264, 279
collectors, and eroticism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
conquers britain, his infirmities Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
conversion, philosophical conversion Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
conversion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280, 282
cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
curiatii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
death Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 280
devotion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260
divine being, tantalus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
education Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278, 279
equality Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
eschatology, transmigration Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
ethics, morality Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264, 278
evangelism Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
exile Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
fear Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
fossils Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
gauls, besiege the capitoline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
gratitude Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 279
heresy, apotactites Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
heresy, encratites Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
heresy, marcion' Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
horatii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
horatius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
identity, and gender Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
inscription Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
janus, curiatius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
julius caesar, c., private tastes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
juno, sororia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
king, emperor, alexander the great Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
king, emperor, domitian Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
king, emperor, julian Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
king, emperor, marcus aurelius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260, 264, 278, 279, 280, 282
king, emperor, nero Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
king, emperor, trajan Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
king, emperor, vespasian Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260, 279
lucian Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
madness Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280, 282
marriage Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
mind, observation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 279
name Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
nero, fondness for corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
pain Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
parrhasius, his atalanta and meleager Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
patronage Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
petronius Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83
philosophy, cynic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278, 279, 280, 282
philosophy, platonic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 280
philosophy, pythagorean Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
philosophy, stoic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 280
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260, 264, 278, 279, 280, 282
philostratus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
plato Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
polemo of laodicea Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
praise Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264, 282
protogenes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
rhetoric, allusion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
rhetoric, deliberative Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
rhetoric, dialogue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260, 264, 278, 279, 280, 282
rhetoric, diatribe Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 279
rhetoric, emphasis Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
rhetoric, figure, trope Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260, 264
rhetoric, hyperbole Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
rhetoric, imagery Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
rhetoric, irony Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260, 264, 280
rhetoric, maxim Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
rhetoric, metaphor Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264, 280
rhetoric, satire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260, 264, 278, 279, 280, 282
rhetoric Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 256, 260, 264, 280, 282
rome, city Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
rome, empire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260, 282
rome, gauls besiege Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
rome, temple of venus calva Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
rome, tigillum sororium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
rome, via sacra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
satire Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83
school, philosophical schools Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
school, school fees Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
slavery (servant) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
socrates Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
soul Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 260
student, terminology Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
student-teacher relationship Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
teacher Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 233
theater, comedy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264, 279
tiberius, and erotica Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, and lysippus apoxyomenos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, his private collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, villa on capri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
timomachus of byzantium, his ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
timomachus of byzantium, his medea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
vice, immorality Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 279
virtue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 278
wisdom Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 264
women, idealized values and Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
women, resistance and liberation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181
women Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 181