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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7479
Lucian, Apology, 12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Livy, History, 38.50.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.62, 1.84, 3.42, 4.44, 4.97, 21.6, 57.6 (1st cent. CE

3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.9.32, 1.18.1, 1.29.44, 2.18.28, 3.15.13, 3.16.3, 3.16.7, 3.16.15-3.16.16, 3.19.1-3.19.2, 3.22.30, 3.22.63, 3.22.75, 3.22.79, 3.22.99 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.44, 1.209 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.44. Now he that governed the elephant was but a private man; and had he proved to be Antiochus, Eleazar had performed nothing more by this bold stroke than that it might appear he chose to die, when he had the bare hope of thereby doing a glorious action; 1.44. This charge fell like a thunderbolt upon Herod, and put him into disorder; and that especially, because his love to her occasioned him to be jealous, and because he considered with himself that Cleopatra was a shrewd woman, and that on her account Lysanias the king was taken off, as well as Malichus the Arabian; for his fear did not only extend to the dissolving of his marriage, but to the danger of his life. 1.209. These men said, that by committing the public affairs to the management of Antipater and of his sons, he sat down with nothing but the bare name of a king, without any of its authority; and they asked him how long he would so far mistake himself, as to breed up kings against his own interest; for that they did not now conceal their government of affairs any longer, but were plainly lords of the nation, and had thrust him out of his authority; that this was the case when Herod slew so many men without his giving him any command to do it, either by word of mouth, or by his letter, and this in contradiction to the law of the Jews; who therefore, in case he be not a king, but a private man, still ought to come to his trial, and answer it to him, and to the laws of his country, which do not permit anyone to be killed till he had been condemned in judgment.
5. Musonius Rufus, Dissertationum A Lucio Digestarum Reliquiae, 9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. New Testament, Acts, 4.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.13. Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and had perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marveled. They recognized that they had been with Jesus.
7. Plutarch, Brutus, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Comparison of Lucullus With Cimon, 2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Comparison of Numa With Lycurgus, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1. Now that we have recounted the lives of Numa and Lycurgus, and both lie clearly before us, we must attempt, even though the task be difficult, to assemble and put together their points of difference. For their points of likeness are obvious from their careers: their wise moderation, their piety, their talent for governing and educating, and their both deriving their laws from a divine source. But each also performed noble deeds peculiar to himself. To begin with, Numa accepted, but Lycurgus resigned, a kingdom.
10. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 20.3-20.4, 20.8-20.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.3. For not only was the Roman people softened and charmed by the righteousness and mildness of their king, but also the cities round about, as if some cooling breeze or salubrious wind were wafted upon them from Rome, began to experience a change of temper, and all of them were filled with longing desire to have good government, to be at peace, to till the earth, to rear their children in quiet, and to worship the gods. 20.4. Festivals and feasts, hospitalities and friendly converse between people who visited one another promiscuously and without fear,—these prevailed throughout Italy, while honour and justice flowed into all hearts from the wisdom of Numa, as from a fountain, and the calm serenity of his spirit diffused itself abroad. Thus even the hyperboles of the poets fall short of picturing the state of man in those days: 20.8. For possibly there is no need of any compulsion or menace in dealing with the multitude, but when they see with their own eyes a conspicuous and shining example of virtue in the life of their ruler, they will of their own accord walk in wisdom’s ways, and unite with him in conforming themselves to a blameless and blessed life of friendship and mutual concord, attended by righteousness and temperance. Such a life is the noblest end of all government, and he is most a king who can inculcate such a life and such a disposition in his subjects. This, then, as it appears, Numa was preeminent in discerning.
12. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Helviam, 19.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 23.3, 23.78, 24.31, 26.11-26.12, 26.33, 26.59-26.63, 26.66, 26.101 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Lucian, Disowned, 26 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. I confess to being a little ashamed both on your account and my own. There are you asking that the memory of arch scoundrel should be perpetuated in writing; here am I going seriously into an investigation of this sort — the doings of a person whose deserts entitled him not to be read about by the cultivated, but to be torn to pieces in the amphitheatre by apes or foxes, with a vast audience looking on. Well, well, if any one does cast reflections of that sort upon us, we shall at least have a precedent to plead. Arrian himself, a disciple of Epictetus[1], distinguished Roman, and product of lifelong culture as he was, had just our experience and shall make our defence. He condescended, that is, to put on record the life of the robber Tilliborus[2]. The robber we propose to immortalize was of a far more pestilent kind, following his profession not in the forests and mountains, but in cities; he was not content to overrun a Mysia or an Ida[3]; his booty came not from a few scantily populated districts of Asia; one may say that the scene of his depredations was the whole Roman Empire. [1] Arrian … Epictetus | Arrian wrote down the Stoic philosophy of Epictetus. He was also author of famous biographies and histories. [2] Tilliborus | This text by Arrian is no longer extant.6) [3] a Mysia or an Ida | Mysia - region near Troy; Ida - mountain near Troy.
16. Lucian, Apology, 15, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Lucian, The Double Indictment, 33, 27 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Gentlemen, the defendant was no more than a boy — he still spoke with his native accent, and might at any moment have exhibited himself in the garb of an Assyrian — when I found him wandering up and down Ionia, at a loss for employment. I took him in hand; I gave him an education; and, convinced of his capabilities and of his devotion to me (for he was my very humble servant in those days, and had no admiration to spare for anyone else), I turned my back upon the many suitors who sought my hand, upon the wealthy, the brilliant and the high born, and betrothed myself to this monster of ingratitude; upon this obscure pauper boy I bestowed the rich dowry of my surpassing eloquence, brought him to be enrolled among my own people, and made him my fellow citizen, to the bitter mortification of his unsuccessful rivals. When he formed the resolution of travelling, in order to make his good fortune known to the world, I did not remain behind: I accompanied him everywhere, from city to city, shedding my lustre upon him, and clothing him in honour and renown. of our travels in Greece and Ionia, I say nothing: he expressed a wish to visit Italy: I sailed the Ionian Sea with him, and attended him even as far as Gaul, scattering plenty in his path.For a long time he consulted my wishes in everything, was unfailing in his attendance upon me, and never passed a night away from my side.
18. Lucian, On Mourning, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. The vulgar (as philosophers call the generality of mankind), implicitly taking as their text book the fictions of Homer and Hesiod and other poets, assume the existence of a deep subterranean hole called Hades; spacious, murky, and sunless, but by some mysterious means sufficiently lighted to render all its details visible. Its king is a brother of Zeus, one Pluto; whose name — so an able philologer assures me — contains a complimentary allusion to his ghostly wealth. As to the nature of his government, and the condition of his subjects, the authority allotted to him extends over all the dead, who, from the moment that they come under his control, are kept in unbreakable fetters; Shades are on no account permitted to return to Earth; to this rule there have been only two or three exceptions since the beginning of the world, and these were made for very urgent reasons.
19. Lucian, The Passing of Peregrinus, 12-16, 18, 26, 37, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Lucian, The Syrian Goddess, 1.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, Demonax, 5, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Lucian, The Runaways, 14-15, 20-21, 3-4, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. My followers would have restrained them, and exposed their errors: but they grew angry, and conspired against them, and in the end brought them under the power of the law, which condemned them to drink of hemlock. Doubtless I should have done well to renounce humanity there and then, and take my flight: but Antisthenes and Diogenes, and after them Crates, and our friend Menippus, prevailed upon me to tarry yet a little longer. Would that I had never yielded! I should have been spared much pain in the sequel.
23. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 86 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

86. Her . You are quite right. And now I will be off to metamorphose myself. When we next meet, there will be no long, shaggy beard, no artificial composure; I shall be natural, as a gentleman should. I may go as far as a fashionable coat, by way of publishing my renunciation of nonsense. I only wish there were an emetic that would purge out every doctrine they have instilled into me; I assure you, if I could reverse Chrysippus's plan with the hellebore, and drink forgetfulness, not of the world but of Stoicism, I would not think twice about it. Well, Lycinus, I owe you a debt indeed; I was being swept along in a rough turbid torrent, unresisting, drifting with the stream; when lo, you stood there and fished me out, a true deus ex machina. I have good enough reason, I think, to shave my head like the people who get clear off from a wreck; for I am to make votive offerings today for the dispersion of that thick cloud which was over my eyes. Henceforth, if I meet a philosopher on my walks (and it will not be with my will), I shall turn aside and avoid him as I would a mad dog.
24. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Such was the entertainment afforded me by royalty; private life was much more amusing; for I could make that out too. I saw Hermodorus the Epicurean perjuring himself for 40 pounds, Agathocles the Stoic suing a pupil for his fees, lawyer Clinias stealing a bowl from the temple of Asclepius, and Herophilus the cynic sleeping in a brothel. Not to mention the multitude of burglars, litigants, usurers, duns; oh, it was a fine representative show!Fr. I must say, Menippus, I should have liked the details here too; it all seems to have been very much to your taste.Me. I could not go through the whole of it, even to please you; to take it in with the eyes kept one busy. But the main divisions were very much what Homer gives from the shield of Achilles: here junketings and marriages, there courts and councils, in another compartment a sacrifice, and hard by a mourning. If I glanced at Getica, I would see the Getae at war; at Scythia, there were the Scythians wandering about on their waggons; half a turn in another direction gave me Egyptians at the plough, or Phoenicians chaffering, Cilician pirates, Spartan flagellants, Athenians at law.
25. Lucian, Nigrinus, 37 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

37. Or if they reach the mark, they do but graze its surface; there can be no deep wound, where the archer lacks strength. But a good marksman, a Nigrinus, begins with a careful examination of the mark, in case it should be particularly soft,— or again too hard; for there are marks which will take no impression from an arrow. Satisfied on this point, he dips his shaft, not in the poisons of Scythia or Crete, but in a certain ointment of his own, which is sweet in flavour and gentle in operation; then, without more ado, he lets fly. The shaft speeds with well judged swiftness, cleaves the mark right through, and remains lodged in it; and the drug works its way through every part. Thus it is that men hear his words with mingled joy and grief; and this was my own case, while the drug was gently diffusing itself through my soul. Hence I was moved to apostrophize him in the words of Homer:So aim; and thou shalt bring (to some) salvation.For as it is not every man that is maddened by the sound of the Phrygian flute, but only those who are inspired of Cybele, and by those strains are recalled to their frenzy,— so too not every man who hears the words of the philosophers will go away possessed, and stricken at heart, but only those in whose nature is something akin to philosophy.
26. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Lucian, A True Story, 2.31 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Lucian, Philosophies For Sale, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age, old Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
ailios aristeides Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
alexander iii of makedon Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
alexander of abonouteichos Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
animal, dog Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
antioch Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
apology (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
archidikastēs Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
archives, local Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 86
athens Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
auctoritas Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
biography Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
caesars, roman Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
christians, christianity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
chōra, egyptian Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
citizens, roman Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
constitutiones Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
conversion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
countryside Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
crete vii Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
cult, mysteries, rituals, foundation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
cynics, cynic views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
dea syria Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
death Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
decision making Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
deification Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
dialogues (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
dion of prousa Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
divine being, cronus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
divine being, destiny Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
divine being, hermes Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
economics, wealth Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
education Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
egypt Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
epiktetos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
euphrates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
exēgētēs Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
family, household Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
gaul Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
goetes, religious charlatans/fraud Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
governor, advisors to Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
greece, greek philosophers Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
hellenism Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
heracles Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
herodotus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
hierapolis Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
honor Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
humankind, unity of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
immolation, self-immolation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
individual Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
italy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
king, emperor, marcus aurelius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257, 282
letters Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
literacy' Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 86
loukianos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
lucian Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 86
lucian of samosata Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
lucius verus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
madness Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
marcus aurelius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
menippos of gadara Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
mind, observation Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
nature, natural phenomena, earth, land Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
nature, natural phenomena, heaven, sky Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
oikoumene Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
olympia Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
parthians Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
philosophy, cynic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257, 282
philosophy, epicurean Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
philosophy, stoic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
philosophy Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27; Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257, 282
plutarch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74, 78
praise Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
precedents Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
punishment Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rhetoric, dialogue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257, 282
rhetoric, satire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257, 282
rhetoric Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rhētōr Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
roman empire as a unit Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
rome, cultural tradition Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
rome, empire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
rome, provinces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
satire (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 176
scipio africanus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 78
scribes, royal Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
senate, roman Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
senatus consultum Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
socrates Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 282
sparta Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 74
stratēgoi Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27
tyranny Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 257
veterans Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 27