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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7555
Lucian, A True Story, 1.26
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 7.120, 11.93-11.94 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Herodotus, Histories, 2.49-2.53, 2.81, 2.171, 2.177.2, 3.38 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.49. Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. ,I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. ,Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia . 2.50. In fact, the names of nearly all the gods came to Hellas from Egypt . For I am convinced by inquiry that they have come from foreign parts, and I believe that they came chiefly from Egypt . ,Except the names of Poseidon and the Dioscuri, as I have already said, and Hera, and Hestia, and Themis, and the Graces, and the Nereids, the names of all the gods have always existed in Egypt . I only say what the Egyptians themselves say. The gods whose names they say they do not know were, as I think, named by the Pelasgians, except Poseidon, the knowledge of whom they learned from the Libyans. ,Alone of all nations the Libyans have had among them the name of Poseidon from the beginning, and they have always honored this god. The Egyptians, however, are not accustomed to pay any honors to heroes. 2.51. These customs, then, and others besides, which I shall indicate, were taken by the Greeks from the Egyptians. It was not so with the ithyphallic images of Hermes; the production of these came from the Pelasgians, from whom the Athenians were the first Greeks to take it, and then handed it on to others. ,For the Athenians were then already counted as Greeks when the Pelasgians came to live in the land with them and thereby began to be considered as Greeks. Whoever has been initiated into the rites of the Cabeiri, which the Samothracians learned from the Pelasgians and now practice, understands what my meaning is. ,Samothrace was formerly inhabited by those Pelasgians who came to live among the Athenians, and it is from them that the Samothracians take their rites. ,The Athenians, then, were the first Greeks to make ithyphallic images of Hermes, and they did this because the Pelasgians taught them. The Pelasgians told a certain sacred tale about this, which is set forth in the Samothracian mysteries. 2.52. Formerly, in all their sacrifices, the Pelasgians called upon gods without giving name or appellation to any (I know this, because I was told at Dodona ); for as yet they had not heard of such. They called them gods from the fact that, besides setting everything in order, they maintained all the dispositions. ,Then, after a long while, first they learned the names of the rest of the gods, which came to them from Egypt, and, much later, the name of Dionysus; and presently they asked the oracle at Dodona about the names; for this place of divination, held to be the most ancient in Hellas, was at that time the only one. ,When the Pelasgians, then, asked at Dodona whether they should adopt the names that had come from foreign parts, the oracle told them to use the names. From that time onwards they used the names of the gods in their sacrifices; and the Greeks received these later from the Pelasgians. 2.53. But whence each of the gods came to be, or whether all had always been, and how they appeared in form, they did not know until yesterday or the day before, so to speak; ,for I suppose Hesiod and Homer flourished not more than four hundred years earlier than I; and these are the ones who taught the Greeks the descent of the gods, and gave the gods their names, and determined their spheres and functions, and described their outward forms. ,But the poets who are said to have been earlier than these men were, in my opinion, later. The earlier part of all this is what the priestesses of Dodona tell; the later, that which concerns Hesiod and Homer, is what I myself say. 2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this. 2.171. On this lake they enact by night the story of the god's sufferings, a rite which the Egyptians call the Mysteries. I could say more about this, for I know the truth, but let me preserve a discreet silence. ,Let me preserve a discreet silence, too, concerning that rite of Demeter which the Greeks call dateThesmophoria /date , except as much of it as I am not forbidden to mention. ,The daughters of Danaus were those who brought this rite out of Egypt and taught it to the Pelasgian women; afterwards, when the people of the Peloponnese were driven out by the Dorians, it was lost, except in so far as it was preserved by the Arcadians, the Peloponnesian people which was not driven out but left in its home. 2.177.2. It was Amasis also who made the law that every Egyptian declare his means of livelihood to the ruler of his district annually, and that omitting to do so or to prove that one had a legitimate livelihood be punishable with death. Solon the Athenian got this law from Egypt and established it among his people; may they always have it, for it is a perfect law. 3.38. I hold it then in every way proved that Cambyses was quite insane; or he would never have set himself to deride religion and custom. For if it were proposed to all nations to choose which seemed best of all customs, each, after examination, would place its own first; so well is each convinced that its own are by far the best. ,It is not therefore to be supposed that anyone, except a madman, would turn such things to ridicule. I will give this one proof among many from which it may be inferred that all men hold this belief about their customs. ,When Darius was king, he summoned the Greeks who were with him and asked them for what price they would eat their fathers' dead bodies. They answered that there was no price for which they would do it. ,Then Darius summoned those Indians who are called Callatiae, who eat their parents, and asked them (the Greeks being present and understanding through interpreters what was said) what would make them willing to burn their fathers at death. The Indians cried aloud, that he should not speak of so horrid an act. So firmly rooted are these beliefs; and it is, I think, rightly said in Pindar's poem that custom is lord of all.
3. Plato, Sophist, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

240a. He will feign ignorance of mirrors and water and of sight altogether, and will question you only about that which is deduced from your words. Theaet. What is that? Str. That which exists throughout all these things which you say are many but which you saw fit to call by one name, when you said image of them all, as if they were all one thing. So speak and defend yourself. Do not give way to the man at all. Theaet. Why, Stranger, what can we say an image is, except another such thing fashioned in the likeness of the true one? Str. Do you mean another such true one, or
4. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1.1, 1.21.1, 1.22.3-1.22.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.1. Thucydides, an Athenian, wrote the history of the war between the Peloponnesians and the Athenians, beginning at the moment that it broke out, and believing that it would be a great war, and more worthy of relation than any that had preceded it. This belief was not without its grounds. The preparations of both the combatants were in every department in the last state of perfection; and he could see the rest of the Hellenic race taking sides in the quarrel; those who delayed doing so at once having it in contemplation. 1.21.1. On the whole, however, the conclusions I have drawn from the proofs quoted may, I believe, safely be relied on. Assuredly they will not be disturbed either by the lays of a poet displaying the exaggeration of his craft, or by the compositions of the chroniclers that are attractive at truth's expense; the subjects they treat of being out of the reach of evidence, and time having robbed most of them of historical value by enthroning them in the region of legend. Turning from these, we can rest satisfied with having proceeded upon the clearest data, and having arrived at conclusions as exact as can be expected in matters of such antiquity. 1.22.3. My conclusions have cost me some labour from the want of coincidence between accounts of the same occurrences by different eye-witnesses, arising sometimes from imperfect memory, sometimes from undue partiality for one side or the other. 1.22.4. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time.
6. New Testament, Acts, 17 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. New Testament, Apocalypse, 22.18-22.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22.18. I testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book, if anyone adds to them, may God add to him the plagues which are written in this book. 22.19. If anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, may God take away his part from the tree of life, and out of the holy city, which are written in this book.
8. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 1.9.4, 5.13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Apuleius, Apology, 14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 17-18, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Such was the entertainment afforded me by royalty; private life was much more amusing; for I could make that out too. I saw Hermodorus the Epicurean perjuring himself for 40 pounds, Agathocles the Stoic suing a pupil for his fees, lawyer Clinias stealing a bowl from the temple of Asclepius, and Herophilus the cynic sleeping in a brothel. Not to mention the multitude of burglars, litigants, usurers, duns; oh, it was a fine representative show!Fr. I must say, Menippus, I should have liked the details here too; it all seems to have been very much to your taste.Me. I could not go through the whole of it, even to please you; to take it in with the eyes kept one busy. But the main divisions were very much what Homer gives from the shield of Achilles: here junketings and marriages, there courts and councils, in another compartment a sacrifice, and hard by a mourning. If I glanced at Getica, I would see the Getae at war; at Scythia, there were the Scythians wandering about on their waggons; half a turn in another direction gave me Egyptians at the plough, or Phoenicians chaffering, Cilician pirates, Spartan flagellants, Athenians at law.
11. Lucian, Nigrinus, 18, 17 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Such was Rome; such were the blessings she taught men to enjoy. ‘As for me,’ he continued, ‘on returning from my first voyage to Greece, I stopped short a little way from the city, and called myself to account, in the words of Homer, for my return.Ah, wretch! and leav’st thou then the light of day — the joyous freedom of Greece, And wouldst behold —the turmoil of Rome? slander and insolence and gluttony, flatterers and false friends, legacy hunters and murderers? And what wilt thou do here? thou canst not endure these things, neither canst thou escape them!
12. Lucian, How To Write History, 50, 29 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Lucian, A True Story, 1.2-1.4, 1.13, 1.16, 1.22-1.23, 1.25, 1.31-1.33, 2.31 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.21.12, 7.25.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.21.12. Before the sanctuary of Demeter is a spring. On the side of this towards the temple stands a wall of stones, while on the outer side has been made a descent to the spring. Here there is an infallible oracle, not indeed for everything, but only in the case of sick folk. They tie a mirror to a fine cord and let it down, judging the distance so that it does not sink deep into the spring, but just far enough to touch the water with its rim. Or, possibly “disk.” The round mirror might be lowered vertically or horizontally (face upwards). Then they pray to the goddess and burn incense, after which they look into the mirror, which shows them the patient either alive or dead. 7.25.10. On descending from Bura towards the sea you come to a river called Buraicus, and to a small Heracles in a cave. He too is surnamed Buraicus, and here one can divine by means of a tablet and dice. He who inquires of the god offers up a prayer in front of the image, and after the prayer he takes four dice, a plentiful supply of which are placed by Heracles, and throws them upon the table. For every figure made by the dice there is an explanation expressly written on the tablet. I am very uncertain about the meaning of this passage. Frazer's note shows that divination by dice usually took the form of interpreting the sequences of numbers obtained by throwing several dice on to a board. This cannot be the meaning here, as σχῆμα can hardly denote a number on the face of a die, and in any case ἐξήγησιν τοῦ σχήματος must mean “explanation of the shape.” I have accordingly adopted the emendation ἀστραγάλων, but ἐπίτηδες seems to have no point. Frazer, reading apparently ἐπὶ δὲ παντὶ ἀστραγάλῳ σχῆμά τι κ.τ.ἕ, translates: “Each die has a certain figure marked upon it, and the meaning of each figure is explained on the tablet.”
15. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 43.3 (2nd cent. CE

16. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 296-300, 322, 1

1. Since I have collected Material for a memorable history of my visit to Eleazar the High priest of the Jews, and because you, Philocrates, as you lose no opportunity of reminding me, have set great store upon receiving an account of the motives and object of my mission, I have attempted to draw up a clear exposition of the matter for you, for I perceive that you possess a natural love of learning


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles tatius Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
ainigmata Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57
alkyoneus Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
allegory Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 64
apocalypses Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
apocalyptic Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
apollo, thyrxeus, oracle of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
aristides, p. aelius, and odyssey Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
aristides, p. aelius, and rome Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
aristides, p. aelius, orations Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
aristides, p. aelius, panathenaicus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
athens Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234, 235
autopsy Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 213, 214, 218, 219
catoptromancy (mirror divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
celsus Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
christian, christianity Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
dice oracles Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
discourse Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
distance Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
eco, travels in hyperreality Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
education (paideia) Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
egypt, herodotuss representation of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214
ehlers, w. Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
empire, roman Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234, 235
empire Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
epic (genre) Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
ethnography Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234, 235; Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 213, 214, 218, 219
fiction Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
gaiaskopia, modern Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
genre Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191; Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
gods Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
golden age Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
greek, historiography/historians Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
greek, literature/sources Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
hagiography Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
herakles, herodotus, parody of Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57, 58
hero (heroes, heroic) Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
heroikos Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
heterotopias, comic Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 63
historiography Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
history, and fiction Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
history, genre Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
homeland Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
hydromancy (water divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
hyllos Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
identity., complexities of Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214
ideology/ideological Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
intertextuality Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
isis (and osiris) Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
islands of the sun Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
ithaca Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
literate/literacy Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
locus amoenus Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
lucian, icaromenippus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
lucian, nigrinus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 235
lucian, relation to historiography Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 218
lucian, representations of subjectivity in Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214, 218
lucian, self-othering in Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214, 218, 219
lucian, verae historiae Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 235
lucian Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191; Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 213, 214, 218, 219; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
mead, george herbert Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214
memory Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
moon (natural satellite) Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
moon and oracle' Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 99
mystery cults Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
myth, historical Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
myth-telling/tellers Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
myth Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
myth (mythology), and fiction Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
myth (mythology), and religion Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
narrative (διήγησις) Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
nostos Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
novel, ancient Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
novelistic (texts) Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
odysseus, as model Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234, 235
orestes Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
parody, of classical literature Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57, 58, 63, 64
phaeacia Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
philocrates Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
philosophy Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
phoenician Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
photography Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
piety Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
plot Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
polybius Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
protesilaos Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
ps.-aristeas Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
ramusio g.b. Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
rhetoric/rhetorical Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
riddles Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57
sartre, jean-paul Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214
satire Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57, 58, 63, 64
science fiction Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
second Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 234
see also geography/geographical, outer Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
socrates Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 57
solon Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 214
symposium/symposia Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
thucydides Wright, The Letter of Aristeas: 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' (2015) 45
tomb Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
true history (lucian, ἀληθῆ διηγήματα) Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
true stories, and icaromenippus Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221, 222
true stories, book division Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
true stories, island of dreams Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 227
true stories, lunar mirror, encyclopaedic mirror Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 222, 223, 224, 225, 226
true stories, lunar mirror, mirrors and mimesis Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221, 222, 223, 224
true stories, lunar mirror Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
true stories, moon, artificiality Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221
true stories, moon, mirror-world Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221
true stories, moon Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 226, 227
true stories, plato's allegory of the cave" Mheallaigh, Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality (2014) 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
underworld Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
utopia, utopian novel Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
view, cosmic Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 288
vinedresser Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 111
visions Johnson Dupertuis and Shea, Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives (2018) 191
winiarczyk, m. Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 21
wonder (thauma, thôma) Kirkland, Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception (2022) 218, 219