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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.609


nanPrepared, but for the vanquished; and on thee (Would it had been on Caesar) falls the stroke; For we are borne. as all things, to his side. And dost thou doubt, since thou art in my power, Thou art my victim? By what trust in us Cam'st thou, unhappy? Scarce our people tills The fields, though softened by the refluent Nile: Know well our strength, and know we can no more. Rome 'neath the ruin of Pompeius lies: Shalt thou, king, uphold him? Shalt thou dare


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 11.723-11.728, 15.259-15.452 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.1.46. Next to the city of Apollo is Thebes, now called Diospolis, with her hundred gates, through each of which issue two hundred men, with horses and chariots, according to Homer, who mentions also its wealth; not all the wealth the palaces of Egyptian Thebes contain.Other writers use the same language, and consider Thebes as the metropolis of Egypt. Vestiges of its magnitude still exist, which extend 80 stadia in length. There are a great number of temples, many of which Cambyses mutilated. The spot is at present occupied by villages. One part of it, in which is the city, lies in Arabia; another is in the country on the other side of the river, where is the Memnonium. Here are two colossal figures near one another, each consisting of a single stone. One is entire; the upper parts of the other, from the chair, are fallen down, the effect, it is said, of an earthquake. It is believed, that once a day a noise as of a slight blow issues from the part of the statue which remains in the seat and on its base. When I was at those places with Aelius Gallus, and numerous friends and soldiers about him, I heard a noise at the first hour (of the day), but whether proceeding from the base or from the colossus, or produced on purpose by some of those standing around the base, I cannot confidently assert. For from the uncertainty of the cause, I am disposed to believe anything rather than that stones disposed in that manner could send forth sound.Above the Memnonium are tombs of kings in caves, and hewn out of the stone, about forty in number; they are executed with singular skill, and are worthy of notice. Among the tombs are obelisks with inscriptions, denoting the wealth of the kings of that time, and the extent of their empire, as reaching to the Scythians, Bactrians, Indians, and the present Ionia; the amount of tribute also, and the number of soldiers, which composed an army of about a million of men.The priests there are said to be, for the most part, astronomers and philosophers. The former compute the days, not by the moon, but by the sun, introducing into the twelve months of thirty days each five days every year. But in order to complete the whole year, because there is (annually) an excess of a part of a day, they form a period from out of whole days and whole years, the supernumerary portions of which in that period, when collected together, amount to a day. They ascribe to Mercury all knowledge of this kind. To Jupiter, whom they worship above all other deities, a virgin of the greatest beauty and of the most illustrious family (such persons the Greeks call pallades) is dedicated. She prostitutes herself with whom she pleases, until the time occurs for the natural purification of the body; she is afterwards married; but before her marriage, and after the period of prostitution, they mourn for her as for one dead.
3. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.43-8.45, 8.56-8.57, 8.66-8.70, 8.72-8.85, 8.88-8.105, 8.109-8.110, 8.118-8.120, 8.132-8.133, 8.150-8.156, 8.163-8.164, 8.189, 8.204-8.205, 8.211-8.212, 8.237-8.238, 8.276-8.278, 8.281, 8.283-8.288, 8.292-8.294, 8.317-8.318, 8.335, 8.422-8.447, 8.465, 8.473, 8.477-8.478, 8.485-8.487, 8.498, 8.525-8.526, 8.539, 8.542-8.549, 8.553, 8.559, 8.575-8.608, 8.610-8.661, 8.663-8.711, 8.713-8.742 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Silius Italicus, Punica, 10.504-10.506, 10.565-10.567, 13.714-13.716 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 2.59-2.61 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.60.  Not yet aware, however, that his itinerary was disapproved, Germanicus sailed up the Nile, starting from the town of Canopus — founded by the Spartans in memory of the helmsman so named, who was buried there in the days when Menelaus, homeward bound for Greece, was blown to a distant sea and the Libyan coast. From Canopus he visited the next of the river-mouths, which is sacred to Hercules (an Egyptian born, according to the local account, and the eldest of the name, the others of later date and equal virtue being adopted into the title); then, the vast remains of ancient Thebes. On piles of masonry Egyptian letters still remained, embracing the tale of old magnificence, and one of the senior priests, ordered to interpret his native tongue, related that "once the city contained seven hundred thousand men of military age, and with that army King Rhamses, after conquering Libya and Ethiopia, the Medes and the Persians, the Bactrian and the Scyth, and the lands where the Syrians and Armenians and neighbouring Cappadocians dwell, had ruled over all that lies between the Bithynian Sea on the one hand and the Lycian on the other." The tribute-lists of the subject nations were still legible: the weight of silver and gold, the number of weapons and horses, the temple-gifts of ivory and spices, together with the quantities of grain and other necessaries of life to be paid by the separate countries; revenues no less imposing than those which are now exacted by the might of Parthia or by Roman power. 2.61.  But other marvels, too, arrested the attention of Germanicus: in especial, the stone colossus of Memnon, which emits a vocal sound when touched by the rays of the sun; the pyramids reared mountain high by the wealth of emulous kings among wind-swept and all but impassable sands; the excavated lake which receives the overflow of Nile; and, elsewhere, narrow gorges and deeps impervious to the plummet of the explorer. Then he proceeded to Elephantine and Syene, once the limits of the Roman Empire, which now stretches to the Persian Gulf.
6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 69.11.1-69.11.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

69.11.1.  On coming to Greece he was admitted to the highest grade at the Mysteries. After this he passed through Judaea into Egypt and offered sacrifice to Pompey, concerning whom he is said to have uttered this verse: "Strange lack of tomb for one with shrines o'erwhelmed!" Antinous: a bust in the Vatican Museums. And he restored his monument, which had fallen in ruin.
7. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 14.4-14.7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander the great, mausoleum in egypt Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
alexander the great, model for viri militares Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
anger Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 234
cannae Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
cato the younger, in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 225, 235
coins with egypt themes Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
colossus of memnon Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
cordus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
cornelia Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
cosmopolitanism, antonine and severan Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
emperors and egypt, caracalla Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
emperors and egypt, hadrian Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
emperors and egypt, marcus aurelius Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
emperors and egypt, octavian-augustus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
emperors and egypt, septimius severus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
fate' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 234
flaminius Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
funeral Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
gracchus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
hannibal Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
imperial patron Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
italy Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
nile, mystery Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
nilus, god of the nile river Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
paulus, funeral of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
paulus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
pompey, funeral of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
pompey Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus), defines egypt and the nile Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
pompey , in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 225, 234, 235
pythagoras Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 234
ritual, false Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
scipio (africanus) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
socrates Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 235
spectacle Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 123
tombs, of alexander the great Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232
tombs, of pompey Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 232