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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.542-8.544


nanAll who advised the base Pellaean king, Monsters, inhuman; there Achoreus sat Less harsh in failing years, in Memphis born Of empty rites, and guardian of the rise Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis lived the space Marked by the crescent on his sacred brow. First was his voice, for Magnus raised and troth And for the pledges of the king deceased: But, skilled in counsel meet for shameless minds


nanAll who advised the base Pellaean king, Monsters, inhuman; there Achoreus sat Less harsh in failing years, in Memphis born Of empty rites, and guardian of the rise Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis lived the space Marked by the crescent on his sacred brow. First was his voice, for Magnus raised and troth And for the pledges of the king deceased: But, skilled in counsel meet for shameless minds


nanAll who advised the base Pellaean king, Monsters, inhuman; there Achoreus sat Less harsh in failing years, in Memphis born Of empty rites, and guardian of the rise Of fertilising Nile. While he was priest Not only once had Apis lived the space Marked by the crescent on his sacred brow. First was his voice, for Magnus raised and troth And for the pledges of the king deceased: But, skilled in counsel meet for shameless minds


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.50 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.50. 1.  The Thebans say that they are the earliest of all men and the first people among whom philosophy and the exact science of the stars were discovered, since their country enables them to observe more distinctly than others the rising and settings of the stars.,2.  Peculiar to them also is their ordering of the months and years. For they do not reckon the days by the moon, but by the sun, making their month of thirty days, and they add five and a quarter days to the twelve months and in this way fill out the cycle of the year. But they do not intercalate months or subtract days, as most of the Greeks do. They appear to have made careful observations of the eclipses both of the sun and of the moon, and predict them, foretelling without error all the events which actually occur.,3.  of the descendants of this king, the eighth, known as Uchoreus, founded Memphis, the most renowned city of Egypt. For he chose the most favourable spot in all the land, where the Nile divides into several branches to form the "Delta," as it is called from its shape; and the result was that the city, excellently situated as it was at the gates of the Delta, continually controlled the commerce passing into upper Egypt.,4.  Now he gave the city a circumference of one hundred and fifty stades, and made it remarkably strong and adapted to its purpose by works of the following nature.,5.  Since the Nile flowed around the city and covered it at the time of inundation, he threw out a huge mound of earth on the south to serve as a barrier against the swelling of the river and also as a citadel against the attacks of enemies by land; and all around the other sides he dug a large and deep lake, which, by taking up the force of the river and occupying all the space about the city except where the mound had been thrown up, gave it remarkable strength.,6.  And so happily did the founder of the city reckon upon the suitableness of the site that practically all subsequent kings left Thebes and established both their palaces and official residences here. Consequently from this time Thebes began to wane and Memphis to increase, until the time of Alexander the king; for after he had founded the city on the sea which bears his name, all the kings of Egypt after him concentrated their interest on the development of it.,7.  Some adorned it with magnificent palaces, some with docks and harbours, and others with further notable dedications and buildings, to such an extent that it is generally reckoned the first or second city of the inhabited world. But a detailed description of this city we shall set forth in the appropriate period.
2. Horace, Odes, 1.37.6-1.37.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Epodes, 9.11-9.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.445-6.446, 6.667, 15.745-15.842 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 3.11.30-3.11.51, 3.11.53, 3.11.55 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

6. Strabo, Geography, 17.1.6, 17.1.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.1.6. As Alexandreia and its neighbourhood occupy the greatest and principal portion of the description, I shall begin with it.In sailing towards the west, the sea-coast from Pelusium to the Canobic mouth of the Nile is about 1300 stadia in extent, and constitutes, as we have said, the base of the Delta. Thence to the island Pharos are 150 stadia more.Pharos is a small oblong island, and lies quite close to the continent, forming towards it a harbour with a double entrance. For the coast abounds with bays, and has two promontories projecting into the sea. The island is situated between these, and shuts in the bay, lying lengthways in front of it.of the extremities of the Pharos, the eastern is nearest to the continent and to the promontory in that direction, called Lochias, which is the cause of the entrance to the port being narrow. Besides the narrowness of the passage, there are rocks, some under water, others rising above it, which at all times increase the violence of the waves rolling in upon them from the open sea. This extremity itself of the island is a rock, washed by the sea on all sides, with a tower upon it of the same name as the island, admirably constructed of white marble, with several stories. Sostratus of Cnidus, a friend of the kings, erected it for the safety of mariners, as the inscription imports. For as the coast on each side is low and without harbours, with reefs and shallows, an elevated and conspicuous mark was required to enable navigators coming in from the open sea to direct their course exactly to the entrance of the harbour.The western mouth does not afford an easy entrance, but it does not require the same degree of caution as the other. It forms also another port, which has the name of Eunostus, or Happy Return: it lies in front of the artificial and close harbour. That which has its entrance at the above-mentioned tower of Pharos is the great harbour. These (two) lie contiguous in the recess called Heptastadium, and are separated from it by a mound. This mound forms a bridge from the continent to the island, and extends along its western side, leaving two passages only through it to the harbour of Eunostus, which are bridged over. But this work served not only as a bridge, but as an aqueduct also, when the island was inhabited. Divus Caesar devastated the island, in his war against the people of Alexandreia, when they espoused the party of the kings. A few sailors live near the tower.The great harbour, in addition to its being well enclosed by the mound and by nature, is of sufficient depth near the shore to allow the largest vessel to anchor near the stairs. It is also divided into several ports.The former kings of Egypt, satisfied with what they possessed, and not desirous of foreign commerce, entertained a dislike to all mariners, especially the Greeks (who, on account of the poverty of their own country, ravaged and coveted the property of other nations), and stationed a guard here, who had orders to keep off all persons who approached. To the guard was assigned as a place of residence the spot called Rhacotis, which is now a part of the city of Alexandreia, situated above the arsenal. At that time, however, it was a village. The country about the village was given up to herdsmen, who were also able (from their numbers) to prevent strangers from entering the country.When Alexander arrived, and perceived the advantages of the situation, he determined to build the city on the (natural) harbour. The prosperity of the place, which ensued, was intimated, it is said, by a presage which occurred while the plan of the city was tracing. The architects were engaged in marking out the line of the wall with chalk, and had consumed it all, when the king arrived; upon which the dispensers of flour supplied the workmen with a part of the flour, which was provided for their own use; and this substance was used in tracing the greater part of the divisions of the streets. This, they said, was a good omen for the city. 17.1.17. Canobus is a city, distant by land from Alexandreia 120 stadia. It has its name from Canobus, the pilot of Menelaus, who died there. It contains the temple of Sarapis, held in great veneration, and celebrated for the cure of diseases; persons even of the highest rank confide in them, and sleep there themselves on their own account, or others for them. Some persons record the cures, and others the veracity of the oracles which are delivered there. But remarkable above everything else is the multitude of persons who resort to the public festivals, and come from Alexandreia by the canal. For day and night there are crowds of men and women in boats, singing and dancing, without restraint, and with the utmost licentiousness. Others, at Canobus itself, keep hostelries situated on the banks of the canal, which are well adapted for such kind of diversion and revelry.
7. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.688 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.19-1.20, 1.685-1.686, 3.197, 6.474, 6.810-6.811, 8.72-8.85, 8.88-8.105, 8.132-8.133, 8.189, 8.281, 8.283-8.288, 8.335, 8.422-8.447, 8.465, 8.473, 8.477-8.478, 8.485-8.487, 8.498, 8.525-8.526, 8.539, 8.543-8.549, 8.553, 8.559, 8.576, 8.584-8.586, 8.589-8.592, 8.597-8.601, 8.605-8.606, 8.609, 8.615-8.616, 8.619, 8.627-8.631, 8.639-8.661, 8.663-8.711, 8.713-8.742, 8.855-8.859, 8.871-8.872, 9.133-9.135, 9.153-9.154, 9.705, 10.63, 10.66, 10.142 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Silius Italicus, Punica, 10.504-10.506, 10.565-10.567, 13.714-13.716 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Statius, Siluae, 3.2.101-3.2.126 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium,battle of Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108
alexandria Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108
augustus,emperor Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108
baetis,river,barbarian Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
cannae Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
cleopatra vii,roman demonization of Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
cordus Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
cornelia Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
cultic center of isis,resort of vice Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
cultic center of isis Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
egypt,antiquity of Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
egypt,pharaonic Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
egypt,ptolemaic Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
flaminius Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
funeral Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
geography Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45, 47
gracchus Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
hannibal Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
hellenization of egyptian institutions,in statius Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
italy Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45
memphis,cultic center Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
memphis,hellenized Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
memphis,symbolizes pre-roman egypt Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
nile,hostile Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
nile,inundation (flood) of the Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45
nile,peaceful retreat Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
nile,sources of the Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45
paulus,funeral of Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
paulus Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
pelusium,mouth of the nile Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45, 47, 197
pompey,funeral of Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
pompey Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus),defines egypt and the nile Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45, 47
pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus),in statius silvae Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
pyramids Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
ritual,false Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
ritual Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
rivers,literary and philosophic metaphors Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 45
rome and romans,and egypt Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108
scipio (africanus) Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
serapis,greco-egyptian deity Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 197
spectacle Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
tombs,of the pharaohs Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 47
vergil' Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 108