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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.778


nanMore bloodshed, here on me, my wife, and sons Wreak out your vengeance — pledges to the fates Such have we given. Too little for the war Is our destruction? Doth the carnage fail, The world escaping? Magnus' fortunes lost, Why doom all else beside him?" Thus he cried, And passed amid his standards, and recalled His vanquished host that rushed on fate declared. Not for his sake such carnage should be wrought. So thought Pompeius; nor the foeman's sword


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.185-1.192, 3.9-3.35, 7.7-7.20, 7.24, 7.764-7.776, 7.785-7.786 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.12.4, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Suetonius, Caligula, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Suetonius, Tiberius, 59.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 14.10.1-14.10.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.10.1.  But only with the completion of the crime was its magnitude realized by the Caesar. For the rest of the night, sometimes dumb and motionless, but not rarely starting in terror to his feet with a sort of delirium, he waited for the daylight which he believed would bring his end. Indeed, his first encouragement to hope came from the adulation of the centurions and tribunes, as, at the suggestion of Burrus, they grasped his hand and wished him joy of escaping his unexpected danger and the criminal enterprise of his mother. His friends in turn visited the temples; and, once the example had been given, the Campanian towns in the neighbourhood attested their joy by victims and deputations. By a contrast in hypocrisy, he himself was mournful, repining apparently at his own preservation and full of tears for the death of a parent. But because the features of a landscape change less obligingly than the looks of men, and because there was always obtruded upon his gaze the grim prospect of that sea and those shores, — and there were some who believed that he could hear a trumpet, calling in the hills that rose around, and lamentations at his mother's grave, — he withdrew to Naples and forwarded to the senate a letter, the sum of which was that an assassin with his weapon upon him had been discovered in Agermus, one of the confidential freedmen of Agrippina, and that his mistress, conscious of her guilt, had paid the penalty of meditated murder.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actor, acting Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
agrippina the younger, empress Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
allusion Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
annals Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
apollonius rhodius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
bacchus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
c. iulius caesar Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
c. suetonius tranquillus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
caligula, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
cornelia metella Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
dido Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
dio cassius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
drama Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
emotions, as othering' Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
fortuna (fortune) Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
julia (wife of pompey) Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
julius caesar, gaius Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
m. tullius cicero Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
madness Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
maenads Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
matricide Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
medea, ar Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
medea, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
medea, as orestes Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
medea, as pentheus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
medea, as proserpina Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126
nero, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
oneiromancy Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
oratio recta, oratio obliqua Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
patria Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
pharsalus, battle of, lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
pompeius magnus, gnaeus (pompey) Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
seneca the younger Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
speech-acts Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
stoicism Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 154
tacitus, p. cornelius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
tiberius, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
tribunate, tribunes Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
venus, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 126