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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.453-7.454


nanBe won, behold me exile, your disgrace, My kinsman's scorn. From this, 'tis yours to save. Then save! Nor in the latest stage of life, Let Magnus be a slave." Then burned their souls At these his words, indignant at the thought, And Rome rose up within them, and to die Was welcome. Thus alike with hearts aflame Moved either host to battle, one in fear And one in hope of empire. These hands shall do Such work as not the rolling centuries


nanBe won, behold me exile, your disgrace, My kinsman's scorn. From this, 'tis yours to save. Then save! Nor in the latest stage of life, Let Magnus be a slave." Then burned their souls At these his words, indignant at the thought, And Rome rose up within them, and to die Was welcome. Thus alike with hearts aflame Moved either host to battle, one in fear And one in hope of empire. These hands shall do Such work as not the rolling centuries


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 8.31, 24.804 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

8.31. /But at length there spake among them the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene:Father of us all, thou son of Cronos, high above all lords, well know we of ourselves that thy might is unyielding, yet even so have we pity for the Danaan spearmen who now shall perish and fulfill an evil fate. 24.804. /lest the well-greaved Achaeans should set upon them before the time. And when they had piled the barrow they went back, and gathering together duly feasted a glorious feast in the palace of Priam, the king fostered of Zeus.On this wise held they funeral for horse-taming Hector.
2. Herodotus, Histories, 3.80 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.”
3. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.4.8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.8. Do you think you have any wisdom yourself? Oh! Ask me a question and judge from my answer. And do you suppose that wisdom is nowhere else to be found, although you know that you have a mere speck of all the earth in your body and a mere drop of all the water, and that of all the other mighty elements you received, I suppose, just a scrap towards the fashioning of your body? But as for mind, which alone, it seems, is without mass, do you think that you snapped it up by a lucky accident, and that the orderly ranks of all these huge masses, infinite in number, are due, forsooth, to a sort of absurdity?
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.58. the nature of the world itself, which encloses and contains all things in its embrace, is styled by Zeno not merely 'craftsmanlike' but actually 'a craftsman,' whose foresight plans out the work to serve its use and purpose in every detail. And as the other natural substances are generated, reared and sustained each by its own seeds, so the world-nature experiences all those motions of the will, those impulses of conation and desire, that the Greeks call hormae, and follows these up with the appropriate actions in the same way as do we ourselves, who experience emotions and sensations. Such being the nature of the world-mind, it can therefore correctly be designated as prudence or providence (for in Greek it is termed pronoia); and this providence is chiefly directed and concentrated upon three objects, namely to secure for the world, first, the structure best fitted for survival; next, absolute completeness; but chiefly, consummate beauty and embellishment of every kind.
5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.116-1.118 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.466-6.474, 6.549-6.550 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.257-1.258, 1.278-1.279, 7.266-7.268, 12.952 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.257. in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased 1.258. the victory of his bow, till on the ground 1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 7.266. Once out of Tuscan Corythus he fared; 7.267. but now in golden house among the stars 7.268. he has a throne, and by his altars blest 12.952. were battering the foundations, now laid by
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.1-1.7, 1.24-1.29, 1.72-1.80, 1.128, 1.642-1.645, 2.1-2.2, 2.4, 2.7-2.13, 2.116, 2.263-2.264, 2.319-2.322, 4.98-4.120, 4.807-4.808, 5.396, 5.636-5.637, 5.655-5.671, 6.784-6.790, 7.356-7.360, 7.385-7.452, 7.454-7.459, 7.617-7.646, 7.789-7.802, 7.809, 7.862 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Furens, 333-353, 931-933, 935-937, 332 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 700-708, 699 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 205-219, 340-399, 204 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Statius, Siluae, 2.7.100-2.7.101 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.509, 2.528, 2.1107, 2.1116



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 5
aeneas, as tyrannus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
agamemnon Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
agricultural decline and destruction Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
apocalyptic literature Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8
arius dydimus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
atom Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
balbus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
caesar, c. julius, lucan Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
caesar, julius, commentarii de bello civili Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 139
calliope Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 5
cannae, battle of, compared with pharsalia Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 114, 115
cato, the younger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
chrysippus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
cicero, as reader Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 125
cicero Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
cleanthes Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
closure, passim Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8, 139
code and norm in epic Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 114, 119, 121
consulship, its destruction in the ph. Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8
conte, gian biagio Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 114, 121
creon, sen. king oedipus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
decay Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
demiurge Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
dionysius of alexandria Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
durry, m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 129, 139
ennius, time and space in Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 113, 114, 115, 116, 117
eschatology, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
eteocles, sen. phoen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
eusebius of caesarea Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
fear, as principle of government or ruling device Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
fear, tyrants psychology Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
fire narratives, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
flood narratives, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
gods, the absence of their providence in lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8, 114, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 124, 125
goldschmidt, v. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
grant, r. m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
hector Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 139
hercules Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
hesperia, as evocative term in the ph. Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 124
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 139
homer, place of in epic poetry Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 5
jupiter, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
jupiter, met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
juturna Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
livius andronicus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 119
lucan, civil war Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
lucan Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
lucretius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117, 120
mars Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 122, 123
metapoetic diction, degener Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 122
metapoetic diction, fatum Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 117
muses Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 125
naevius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 119
narducci, e. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
narrator Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 113, 114, 120
nenia, nero, reign of Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
ovid Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 124
pharsalia, name of the poem Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 116, 117
pharsalus, battle of Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
plato Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
pluto, ov. met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
pompey Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
populus romanus, as central character in the pharsalia Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 122, 123, 124, 125, 129
providence Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
romulus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 122, 123
scaeva Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 139
seneca, herc. fur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
seneca, oed. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
seneca Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 8
servius, as reader Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 119
simon, h. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
socrates Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
space and time in the ph. Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 120, 123
stars, in lucans works' Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 185
statius, as early reader of lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 5
steen due, o. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
suicide, anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
teleology Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
tereus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
thyestes Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
topoi, of a day of doom, Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 113, 114, 115, 116, 117
turnus, as tyrannus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
turnus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38
tyrant, epic tradition Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
tyrant, psychology of Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 38, 39
tyrant, roman stock Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
tyrant, senecas tragedies Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 39
virgil, as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 5, 116, 117, 124, 139
xenophon Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
zeno of citium Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211