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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.654-5.671


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanSee what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanTo reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar's trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e'en without a prayer.


nanBreak through the middle storm and trust in me. The burden of this fight fails not on us But on the sky and ocean; and our bark Shall swim the billows safe in him it bears. Nor shall the wind rage long: the boat itself Shall calm the waters. Flee the nearest shore, Steer for the ocean with unswerving hand: Then in the deep, when to our ship and us No other port is given, believe thou hast Calabria's harbours. And dost thou not know


nanBreak through the middle storm and trust in me. The burden of this fight fails not on us But on the sky and ocean; and our bark Shall swim the billows safe in him it bears. Nor shall the wind rage long: the boat itself Shall calm the waters. Flee the nearest shore, Steer for the ocean with unswerving hand: Then in the deep, when to our ship and us No other port is given, believe thou hast Calabria's harbours. And dost thou not know


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 4.275-4.279, 22.304-22.305 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.275. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.276. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.277. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.278. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.279. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 22.304. /Now of a surety is evil death nigh at hand, and no more afar from me, neither is there way of escape. So I ween from of old was the good pleasure of Zeus, and of the son of Zeus, the god that smiteth afar, even of them that aforetime were wont to succour me with ready hearts; but now again is my doom come upon me. Nay, but not without a struggle let me die, neither ingloriously 22.305. /but in the working of some great deed for the hearing of men that are yet to be. So saying, he drew his sharp sword that hung beside his flank, a great sword and a mighty, and gathering himself together swooped like an eagle of lofty flight that darteth to the plain through the dark clouds to seize a tender lamb or a cowering hare;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1-1.4, 5.34-5.35, 5.282-5.463, 9.76-9.84, 13.78-13.95, 13.109-13.112, 13.125, 13.200-13.216 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 11-12, 265-266, 408-419, 423-435, 732, 741-743, 768-772, 10 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. αὐτὸς γὰρ τά γε σήματʼ ἐν οὐρανῷ ἐστήριξεν
4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.1250-4.1276, 4.1318-4.1329 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.1318. ‘κάμμορε, τίπτʼ ἐπὶ τόσσον ἀμηχανίῃ βεβόλησαι; 4.1319. ἴδμεν ἐποιχομένους χρύσεον δέρος· ἴδμεν ἕκαστα 4.1320. ὑμετέρων καμάτων, ὅσʼ ἐπὶ χθονός, ὅσσα τʼ ἐφʼ ὑγρὴν 4.1321. πλαζόμενοι κατὰ πόντον ὑπέρβια ἔργʼ ἐκάμεσθε. 4.1322. οἰοπόλοι δʼ εἰμὲν χθόνιαι θεαὶ αὐδήεσσαι 4.1323. ἡρῷσσαι, Λιβύης τιμήοροι ἠδὲ θύγατρες. 4.1324. ἀλλʼ ἄνα· μηδʼ ἔτι τοῖον ὀιζύων ἀκάχησο· 4.1325. ἄνστησον δʼ ἑτάρους. εὖτʼ ἂν δέ τοι Ἀμφιτρίτη 4.1326. ἅρμα Ποσειδάωνος ἐύτροχον αὐτίκα λύσῃ 4.1327. δή ῥα τότε σφετέρῃ ἀπὸ μητέρι τίνετʼ ἀμοιβὴν 4.1328. ὧν ἔκαμεν δηρὸν κατὰ νηδύος ὔμμε φέρουσα· 4.1329. καί κεν ἔτʼ ἠγαθέην ἐς Ἀχαιίδα νοστήσαιτε.’
5. Catullus, Poems, 101.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.195-5.234, 6.96-6.101, 6.253-6.256, 6.357-6.378 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.291-1.292, 11.474-11.572 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 1.2.19-1.2.26 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

9. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.72, 3.5, 3.73, 3.126-3.127, 3.133, 3.136, 3.142, 3.160, 5.479, 5.560-5.653, 5.655-5.677 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, Agamemnon, 466-497, 465 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.598-1.692

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.50-1.156, 6.692-6.693

1.50. Below th' horizon the Sicilian isle 1.51. just sank from view, as for the open sea 1.52. with heart of hope they sailed, and every ship 1.53. clove with its brazen beak the salt, white waves. 1.54. But Juno of her everlasting wound 1.55. knew no surcease, but from her heart of pain 1.56. thus darkly mused: “Must I, defeated, fail 1.57. of what I will, nor turn the Teucrian King 1.58. from Italy away? Can Fate oppose? 1.59. Had Pallas power to lay waste in flame 1.60. the Argive fleet and sink its mariners 1.61. revenging but the sacrilege obscene 1.62. by Ajax wrought, Oileus' desperate son? 1.63. She, from the clouds, herself Jove's lightning threw 1.64. cattered the ships, and ploughed the sea with storms. 1.65. Her foe, from his pierced breast out-breathing fire 1.66. in whirlwind on a deadly rock she flung. 1.67. But I, who move among the gods a queen 1.68. Jove's sister and his spouse, with one weak tribe 1.69. make war so long! Who now on Juno calls? 1.71. So, in her fevered heart complaining still 1.72. unto the storm-cloud land the goddess came 1.73. a region with wild whirlwinds in its womb 1.74. Aeolia named, where royal Aeolus 1.75. in a high-vaulted cavern keeps control 1.76. o'er warring winds and loud concourse of storms. 1.77. There closely pent in chains and bastions strong 1.78. they, scornful, make the vacant mountain roar 1.79. chafing against their bonds. But from a throne 1.80. of lofty crag, their king with sceptred hand 1.81. allays their fury and their rage confines. 1.82. Did he not so, our ocean, earth, and sky 1.83. were whirled before them through the vast ie. 1.84. But over-ruling Jove, of this in fear 1.85. hid them in dungeon dark: then o'er them piled 1.86. huge mountains, and ordained a lawful king 1.87. to hold them in firm sway, or know what time 1.88. with Jove's consent, to loose them o'er the world. 1.90. “Thou in whose hands the Father of all gods 1.91. and Sovereign of mankind confides the power 1.92. to calm the waters or with winds upturn 1.93. great Aeolus! a race with me at war 1.94. now sails the Tuscan main towards Italy 1.95. bringing their Ilium and its vanquished powers. 1.96. Uprouse thy gales. Strike that proud navy down! 1.97. Hurl far and wide, and strew the waves with dead! 1.98. Twice seven nymphs are mine, of rarest mould; 1.99. of whom Deiopea, the most fair 1.100. I give thee in true wedlock for thine own 1.101. to mate thy noble worth; she at thy side 1.102. hall pass long, happy years, and fruitful bring 1.104. Then Aeolus: “'T is thy sole task, O Queen 1.105. to weigh thy wish and will. My fealty 1.106. thy high behest obeys. This humble throne 1.107. is of thy gift. Thy smiles for me obtain 1.108. authority from Jove. Thy grace concedes 1.109. my station at your bright Olympian board 1.111. Replying thus, he smote with spear reversed 1.112. the hollow mountain's wall; then rush the winds 1.113. through that wide breach in long, embattled line 1.114. and sweep tumultuous from land to land: 1.115. with brooding pinions o'er the waters spread 1.116. east wind and south, and boisterous Afric gale 1.117. upturn the sea; vast billows shoreward roll; 1.118. the shout of mariners, the creak of cordage 1.119. follow the shock; low-hanging clouds conceal 1.120. from Trojan eyes all sight of heaven and day; 1.121. night o'er the ocean broods; from sky to sky 1.122. the thunders roll, the ceaseless lightnings glare; 1.123. and all things mean swift death for mortal man. 1.124. Straightway Aeneas, shuddering with amaze 1.125. groaned loud, upraised both holy hands to Heaven 1.126. and thus did plead: “O thrice and four times blest 1.127. ye whom your sires and whom the walls of Troy 1.128. looked on in your last hour! O bravest son 1.129. Greece ever bore, Tydides! O that I 1.130. had fallen on Ilian fields, and given this life 1.131. truck down by thy strong hand! where by the spear 1.132. of great Achilles, fiery Hector fell 1.133. and huge Sarpedon; where the Simois 1.134. in furious flood engulfed and whirled away 1.136. While thus he cried to Heaven, a shrieking blast 1.137. mote full upon the sail. Up surged the waves 1.138. to strike the very stars; in fragments flew 1.139. the shattered oars; the helpless vessel veered 1.140. and gave her broadside to the roaring flood 1.141. where watery mountains rose and burst and fell. 1.142. Now high in air she hangs, then yawning gulfs 1.143. lay bare the shoals and sands o'er which she drives. 1.144. Three ships a whirling south wind snatched and flung 1.145. on hidden rocks,—altars of sacrifice 1.146. Italians call them, which lie far from shore 1.147. a vast ridge in the sea; three ships beside 1.148. an east wind, blowing landward from the deep 1.149. drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— 1.150. and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. 1.151. That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore 1.152. the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave 1.153. truck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. 1.154. Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side 1.155. fell headlong, while three times the circling flood 1.156. pun the light bark through swift engulfing seas. 6.693. While thus they talked, the crimsoned car of Morn
13. Vergil, Georgics, 1.316-1.334, 1.353

1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amyclas Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 209, 210, 211; Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 144; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 187
ancaeus Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
apollonius rhodius,collective speech in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
apollonius rhodius,lament in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
apollonius rhodius,silence in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
apollonius rhodius,storm in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
aratus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
argo,stranded Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
aristeia' Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 144
caesar,julius,as anti-odyssean Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213
caesar,julius,commentarii de bello civili Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 213
caesar (julius) Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 187
carthage Augoustakis et al. (2021), Fides in Flavian Literature, 207
chaos Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 187
clashing rocks Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
fides definition of,,punica Augoustakis et al. (2021), Fides in Flavian Literature, 207
gods,in the georgics Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
hannibal Augoustakis et al. (2021), Fides in Flavian Literature, 207
homer,model / anti-model for lucan Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213
homer Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
imagery,military Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
jason Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
jupiter Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 187
libyan goddesses Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
mezentius,and caesar Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 144
mezentius Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 144
narducci,emanuele Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 144
neptune Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
nostos,as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213
odysseus Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213
providentialism Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
punic war first,,second Augoustakis et al. (2021), Fides in Flavian Literature, 207
silence Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
silius italicus fides in Augoustakis et al. (2021), Fides in Flavian Literature, 207
speech,collective Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
storms Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
valerius flaccus,collective speech in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
valerius flaccus,lament in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
valerius flaccus,silence in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
valerius flaccus,storm in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
virgil,and aratus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
virgil,as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 208, 209
virgil Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 213
weather signs Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68
zeus Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 68