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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 4.503-4.504


nanEre long they manned the rafts in eager wish To quit the island, when the latest glow Still parted day from night. But Magnus' troops, Cilician once, taught by their ancient art, In fraudulent deceit had left the sea To view unguarded; but with chains unseen Fast to Illyrian shores, and hanging loose, They blocked the outlet in the waves beneath. The leading rafts passed safely, but the third Hung in mid passage, and by ropes was hauled


nanEre long they manned the rafts in eager wish To quit the island, when the latest glow Still parted day from night. But Magnus' troops, Cilician once, taught by their ancient art, In fraudulent deceit had left the sea To view unguarded; but with chains unseen Fast to Illyrian shores, and hanging loose, They blocked the outlet in the waves beneath. The leading rafts passed safely, but the third Hung in mid passage, and by ropes was hauled


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.173 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.173. /neither one so royal: he is like unto one that is a king. And Helen, fair among women, answered him, saying:Revered art thou in mine eyes, dear father of my husband, and dread. Would that evil death had been my pleasure when I followed thy son hither, and left my bridal chamber and my kinfolk
2. Homer, Odyssey, 10.49-10.52, 12.101-12.110, 12.234-12.244 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 862-864, 861 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

861. τὸ μὲν γυναῖκα πρῶτον ἄρσενος δίχα 861. First: for a woman, from the male divided
4. Sophocles, Antigone, 1175 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.789-4.832, 4.922-4.923 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.789. νῦν δὲ παρὰ Σκύλλης σκόπελον μέγαν ἠδὲ Χάρυβδιν 4.790. δεινὸν ἐρευγομένην δέχεται ὁδός. ἀλλά σε γὰρ δὴ 4.791. ἐξέτι νηπυτίης αὐτὴ τρέφον ἠδʼ ἀγάπησα 4.792. ἔξοχον ἀλλάων, αἵ τʼ εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν 4.793. οὕνεκεν οὐκ ἔτλης εὐνῇ Διὸς ἱεμένοιο 4.794. λέξασθαι. κείνῳ γὰρ ἀεὶ τάδε ἔργα μέμηλεν 4.795. ἠὲ σὺν ἀθανάταις ἠὲ θνητῇσιν ἰαύειν. 4.796. ἀλλʼ ἐμὲ αἰδομένη καὶ ἐνὶ φρεσὶ δειμαίνουσα 4.797. ἠλεύω· ὁ δʼ ἔπειτα πελώριον ὅρκον ὄμοσσεν 4.798. μήποτέ σʼ ἀθανάτοιο θεοῦ καλέεσθαι ἄκοιτιν. 4.799. ἔμπης δʼ οὐ μεθίεσκεν ὀπιπεύων ἀέκουσαν 4.800. εἰσότε οἱ πρέσβειρα Θέμις κατέλεξεν ἅπαντα 4.801. ὡς δή τοι πέπρωται ἀμείνονα πατρὸς ἑοῖο 4.802. παῖδα τεκεῖν· τῶ καί σε λιλαιόμενος μεθέηκεν 4.803. δείματι, μή τις ἑοῦ ἀντάξιος ἄλλος ἀνάσσοι 4.804. ἀθανάτων, ἀλλʼ αἰὲν ἑὸν κράτος εἰρύοιτο. 4.805. αὐτὰρ ἐγὼ τὸν ἄριστον ἐπιχθονίων πόσιν εἶναι 4.806. δῶκά τοι, ὄφρα γάμου θυμηδέος ἀντιάσειας 4.807. τέκνα τε φιτύσαιο· θεοὺς δʼ ἐς δαῖτʼ ἐκάλεσσα 4.808. πάντας ὁμῶς· αὐτὴ δὲ σέλας χείρεσσιν ἀνέσχον 4.809. νυμφίδιον, κείνης ἀγανόφρονος εἵνεκα τιμῆς. 4.810. ἀλλʼ ἄγε καί τινά τοι νημερτέα μῦθον ἐνίψω. 4.811. εὖτʼ ἂν ἐς Ἠλύσιον πεδίον τεὸς υἱὸς ἵκηται 4.812. ὃν δὴ νῦν Χείρωνος ἐν ἤθεσι Κενταύροιο 4.813. νηιάδες κομέουσι τεοῦ λίπτοντα γάλακτος 4.814. χρειώ μιν κούρης πόσιν ἔμμεναι Αἰήταο 4.815. Μηδείης· σὺ δʼ ἄρηγε νυῷ ἑκυρή περ ἐοῦσα 4.816. ἠδʼ αὐτῷ Πηλῆι. τί τοι χόλος ἐστήρικται; 4.817. ἀάσθη. καὶ γάρ τε θεοὺς ἐπινίσσεται ἄτη. 4.818. ναὶ μὲν ἐφημοσύνῃσιν ἐμαῖς Ἥφαιστον ὀίω 4.819. λωφήσειν πρήσοντα πυρὸς μένος, Ἱπποτάδην δὲ 4.820. Αἴολον ὠκείας ἀνέμων ἄικας ἐρύξειν 4.821. νόσφιν ἐυσταθέος ζεφύρου, τείως κεν ἵκωνται 4.822. Φαιήκων λιμένας· σὺ δʼ ἀκηδέα μήδεο νόστον. 4.823. δεῖμα δέ τοι πέτραι καὶ ὑπέρβια κύματʼ ἔασιν 4.824. μοῦνον, ἅ κεν τρέψαιο κασιγνήτῃσι σὺν ἄλλαις. 4.825. μηδὲ σύγʼ ἠὲ Χάρυβδιν ἀμηχανέοντας ἐάσῃς 4.826. ἐσβαλέειν, μὴ πάντας ἀναβρόξασα φέρῃσιν 4.827. ἠὲ παρὰ Σκύλλης στυγερὸν κευθμῶνα νέεσθαι 4.828. Σκύλλης Αὐσονίης ὀλοόφρονος, ἣν τέκε Φόρκυι 4.829. νυκτιπόλος Ἑκάτη, τήν τε κλείουσι Κράταιιν 4.830. μή πως σμερδαλέῃσιν ἐπαΐξασα γένυσσιν 4.831. λεκτοὺς ἡρώων δηλήσεται. ἀλλʼ ἔχε νῆα 4.832. κεῖσʼ, ὅθι περ τυτθή γε παραίβασις ἔσσετʼ ὀλέθρου.’ 4.922. τῇ μὲν γὰρ Σκύλλης λισσὴ προυφαίνετο πέτρη· 4.923. τῇ δʼ ἄμοτον βοάασκεν ἀναβλύζουσα Χάρυβδις·
6. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.74 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.74. nostra vehitur oratio ratio Camerar. ). sed haec haec add. V 2 et vetera sunt post vetera add. K 2 et a Graecis; Cato autem sic abiit e vita, ut causam moriendi moriundi K 2 nactum se esse gauderet. vetat enim domis ille in in om. V nobis deus iniussu hinc nos suo demigrare; cum vero causam iustam deus ipse dederit, ut tunc tum GV Socrati, nunc Catoni, saepe multis, ne ille me Dius Fidius vir sapiens laetus ex his tenebris in lucem illam excesserit, nec tamen ille ille Lb. ilia rup erit V vincla carceris ruperit—leges enim vetant—, sed tamquam a magistratu aut ab aliqua potestate legitima, sic a deo evocatus atque emissus exierit. Tota Plato Phaedon 80e enim philosophorum vita, ut ait idem, commentatio mortis est.
7. Livy, History, 9.46.1-9.46.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.33, 3.420-3.423, 6.434-6.437, 11.42-11.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.33. the Fatal Sisters spun. Such was the fear 3.420. of strange vicissitude. So up I climbed 3.421. leaving the haven, fleet, and friendly shore. 3.422. That self-same hour outside the city walls 3.423. within a grove where flowed the mimic stream 6.434. Both hapless and unhonored after death 6.435. Whom, while from Troy they crossed the wind-swept seas 6.437. There, too, the helmsman Palinurus strayed : 11.42. his darling child. Around him is a throng 11.43. of slaves, with all the Trojan multitude 11.44. and Ilian women, who the wonted way
9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 3.261, 3.357, 3.365-3.368, 4.153-4.155, 7.321, 7.327, 7.340-7.341, 7.359 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.261. and that they should set before their eyes how their old men were to be slain, and their children and wives were to be killed immediately by the enemy; and that they would beforehand spend all their fury, on account of the calamities just coming upon them, and pour it out on the actors. 3.357. O Josephus! art thou still fond of life? and canst thou bear to see the light in a state of slavery? How soon hast thou forgotten thyself! How many hast thou persuaded to lose their lives for liberty! 3.365. I confess freely that it is a brave thing to die for liberty; but still so that it be in war, and done by those who take that liberty from us; but in the present case our enemies do neither meet us in battle, nor do they kill us. Now, he is equally a coward who will not die when he is obliged to die, and he who will die when he is not obliged so to do. 3.366. What are we afraid of, when we will not go up to the Romans? Is it death? 3.367. If so, what we are afraid of, when we but suspect our enemies will inflict it on us, shall we inflict it on ourselves for certain? But it may be said we must be slaves. 3.368. And are we then in a clear state of liberty at present? It may also be said that it is a manly act for one to kill himself. No, certainly, but a most unmanly one; as I should esteem that pilot to be an arrant coward, who, out of fear of a storm, should sink his ship of his own accord. 4.153. for in order to try what surprise the people would be under, and how far their own power extended, they undertook to dispose of the high priesthood by casting lots for it, whereas, as we have said already, it was to descend by succession in a family. 4.154. The pretense they made for this strange attempt was an ancient practice, while they said that of old it was determined by lot; but in truth, it was no better than a dissolution of an undeniable law, and a cunning contrivance to seize upon the government, derived from those that presumed to appoint governors as they themselves pleased. 4.155. 8. Hereupon they sent for one of the pontifical tribes, which is called Eniachim, and cast lots which of it should be the high priest. By fortune the lot so fell as to demonstrate their iniquity after the plainest manner, for it fell upon one whose name was Phannias, the son of Samuel, of the village Aphtha. He was a man not only unworthy of the high priesthood, but that did not well know what the high priesthood was, such a mere rustic was he! 7.321. but when he saw their wall burned down by the fire, and could devise no other way of escaping, or room for their further courage, and setting before their eyes what the Romans would do to them, their children, and their wives, if they got them into their power, he consulted about having them all slain. 7.327. It had been proper indeed for us to have conjectured at the purpose of God much sooner, and at the very first, when we were so desirous of defending our liberty, and when we received such sore treatment from one another, and worse treatment from our enemies, and to have been sensible that the same God, who had of old taken the Jewish nation into his favor, had now condemned them to destruction; 7.341. So he made a lamentable groan, and fixing his eyes intently on those that wept, he spake thus:—“Truly, I was greatly mistaken when I thought to be assisting to brave men who struggled hard for their liberty, and to such as were resolved either to live with honor, or else to die; 7.359. for it now appears that God hath made such a decree against the whole Jewish nation, that we are to be deprived of this life which [he knew] we would not make a due use of.
10. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.1, 1.8-1.23, 1.70, 1.667-1.668, 4.243-4.245, 4.402-4.502, 4.504-4.581, 6.140-6.262, 9.64 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Mishnah, Yoma, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.2. Section one: It once happened that two were even as they ran up the ramp, and one of them pushed his fellow who fell and broke his leg. When the court saw that they incurred danger, they decreed that they would remove the ashes from only by a count. Section two: There were four counts. This is the first count."
12. New Testament, Acts, 1.17, 1.26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. For he was numbered with us, and received his portion in this ministry. 1.26. They drew lots for them, and the lot fell on Matthias, and he was numbered with the eleven apostles.
13. Seneca The Younger, De Providentia (Dialogorum Liber I), 2.9-2.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 24.3, 24.5-24.6, 70.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Silius Italicus, Punica, 12.473-12.478, 13.466-13.487, 15.383-15.392 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Statius, Siluae, 2.6.68-2.6.70 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Tacitus, Annals, 15.62-15.64, 16.34-16.35 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.62.  Seneca, nothing daunted, asked for the tablets containing his will. The centurion refusing, he turned to his friends, and called them to witness that "as he was prevented from showing his gratitude for their services, he left them his sole but fairest possession — the image of his life. If they bore it in mind, they would reap the reward of their loyal friendship in the credit accorded to virtuous accomplishments." At the same time, he recalled them from tears to fortitude, sometimes conversationally, sometimes in sterner, almost coercive tones. "Where," he asked, "were the maxims of your philosophy? Where that reasoned attitude towards impending evils which they had studied through so many years? For to whom had Nero's cruelty been unknown? Nor was anything left him, after the killing of his mother and his brother, but to add the murder of his guardian and preceptor. 15.63.  After these and some similar remarks, which might have been meant for a wider audience, he embraced his wife, and, softening momentarily in view of the terrors at present threatening her, begged her, conjured her, to moderate her grief — not to take it upon her for ever, but in contemplating the life he had spent in virtue to find legitimate solace for the loss of her husband. Paulina replied by assuring him that she too had made death her choice, and she demanded her part in the executioner's stroke. Seneca, not wishing to stand in the way of her glory, and influenced also by his affection, that he might not leave the woman who enjoyed his whole-hearted love exposed to outrage, now said: "I had shown you the mitigations of life, you prefer the distinction of death: I shall not grudge your setting that example. May the courage of this brave ending be divided equally between us both, but may more of fame attend your own departure!" Aforesaid, they made the incision in their arms with a single cut. Seneca, since his aged body, emaciated further by frugal living, gave slow escape to the blood, severed as well the arteries in the leg and behind the knee. Exhausted by the racking pains, and anxious lest his sufferings might break down the spirit of his wife, and he himself lapse into weakness at the sight of her agony, he persuaded her to withdraw into another bedroom. And since, even at the last moment his eloquence remained at command, he called his secretaries, and dictated a long discourse, which has been given to the public in his own words, and which I therefore refrain from modifying. 15.64.  Nero, however, who had no private animosity against Paulina, and did not wish to increase the odium of his cruelty, ordered her suicide to be arrested. Under instructions from the military, her slaves and freedmen bandaged her arms and checked the bleeding — whether without her knowledge is uncertain. For, with the usual readiness of the multitude to think the worst, there were those who believed that, so long as she feared an implacable Nero, she had sought the credit of sharing her husband's fate, and then, when a milder prospect offered itself, had succumbed to the blandishments of life. To that life she added a few more years — laudably faithful to her husband's memory and blanched in face and limb to a pallor which showed how great had been the drain upon her vital powers. Seneca, in the meantime, as death continued to be protracted and slow, asked Statius Annaeus, who had long held his confidence as a loyal friend and a skilful doctor, to produce the poison — it had been provided much earlier — which was used for despatching prisoners condemned by the public tribunal of Athens. It was brought, and he swallowed it, but to no purpose; his limbs were already cold, and his system closed to the action of the drug. In the last resort, he entered a vessel of heated water, sprinkling some on the slaves nearest, with the remark that he offered the liquid as a drink-offering to Jove the Liberator. He was then lifted into a bath, suffocated by the vapour, and cremated without ceremony. It was the order he had given in his will, at a time when, still at the zenith of his wealth and power, he was already taking thought for his latter end. 16.34.  The consul's quaestor was then sent to Thrasea: he was spending the time in his gardens, and the day was already closing in for evening. He had brought together a large party of distinguished men and women, his chief attention been given to Demetrius, a master of the Cynic creed; with whom — to judge from his serious looks and the few words which caught the ear, when they chanced to raise their voices — he was debating the nature of the soul and the divorce of spirit and body. At last, Domitius Caecilianus, an intimate friend, arrived, and informed him of the decision reached by the senate. Accordingly, among the tears and expostulations of the company, Thrasea urged them to leave quickly, without linking their own hazardous lot to the fate of a condemned man. Arria, who aspired to follow her husband's ending and the precedent set by her mother and namesake, he advised to keep her life and not deprive the child of their union of her one support. 16.35.  He now walked on to the colonnade; where the quaestor found him nearer to joy than to sorrow, because he had ascertained that Helvidius, his son-in‑law, was merely debarred from Italy. Then, taking the decree of the senate, he led Helvidius and Demetrius into his bedroom, offered the arteries of both arms to the knife, and, when the blood had begun to flow, sprinkled it upon the ground, and called the quaestor nearer: "We are making a libation," he said, "to Jove the Liberator. Look, young man, and — may Heaven, indeed, avert the omen, but you have been born into times now it is expedient to steel the mind with instances of firmness." Soon, as the slowness of his end brought excruciating pain, turning his gaze upon Demetrius . . .
18. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.752-1.826, 3.306-3.308 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeson Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
apollonius of rhodes Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 183
appius (ghost of) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 295
burial Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
caesar, c. julius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
caesar, julius, character in lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 184
caesar, julius, commentarii de bello civili Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 182
cato, the younger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
catulus, (quintus lutatius) Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
charybdis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 292
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295
closure, passim Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 184
closure Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 293
death Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
deuotio Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
endings, open Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
fabius cunctator Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
flavian, epic Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
flavius scriba, gnaeus Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
funeral Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
gracchus, burial of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
gracchus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
hannibal, as religious actor Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
hannibal Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 292
invidia, of fortune Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
invidia, personification of Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
livius andronicus, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295
marcellus, burial of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
marcellus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
marius, (gaius) Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
masada, collective suicide described in josephus, inclusion of speech by eleazar' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 145
metapoetic diction, fama Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 183, 184
metapoetic diction, locus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 184
metapoetic diction, robor Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 181
naevius, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290
pelias Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 295
pompey Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 291
religious communication, actor Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
ritual, false Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
ritual, perverted Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 295
sacrifice Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
scipio (africanus) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
sea power and seafaring, individual ships Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
sea power and seafaring Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
suicide Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
tacitus, senecas death Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
tacitus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
tarquinius priscus Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
thebes Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 292
thrasea paetus, suicide Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
tiberius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
triumph, of scipio Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
valerius flaccus, date of poem\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 295
varro atacinus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 183
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 292
virgil and the aeneid, suicide Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 30
volteius Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 124
vulteius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 180, 181, 182, 183, 184