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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.312


nanThat such a citizen has joined the war? Glad would he see thee e'en in Magnus' tents; For Cato's conduct shall approve his own. Pompeius, with the Consul in his ranks, And half the Senate and the other chiefs, Vexes my spirit; and should Cato too Bend to a master's yoke, in all the world The one man free is Caesar. But if thou For freedom and thy country's laws alone Be pleased to raise the sword, nor Magnus then


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.321-6.329, 6.331 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.321. /the spear-point of bronze, around which ran a ring of gold. He found Paris in his chamber busied with his beauteous arms, his shield and his corselet, and handling his curved bow; and Argive Helen sat amid her serving-women and appointed to them their glorious handiwork. 6.322. /the spear-point of bronze, around which ran a ring of gold. He found Paris in his chamber busied with his beauteous arms, his shield and his corselet, and handling his curved bow; and Argive Helen sat amid her serving-women and appointed to them their glorious handiwork. 6.323. /the spear-point of bronze, around which ran a ring of gold. He found Paris in his chamber busied with his beauteous arms, his shield and his corselet, and handling his curved bow; and Argive Helen sat amid her serving-women and appointed to them their glorious handiwork. 6.324. /the spear-point of bronze, around which ran a ring of gold. He found Paris in his chamber busied with his beauteous arms, his shield and his corselet, and handling his curved bow; and Argive Helen sat amid her serving-women and appointed to them their glorious handiwork. 6.325. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.326. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.327. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.328. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.329. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.331. /whomso thou shouldest haply see shrinking from hateful war. Nay, then, rouse thee, lest soon the city blaze with consuming fire.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 23.166-23.240, 23.247-23.253, 23.266-23.284, 23.295-23.343, 23.347, 24.114-24.119 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Tristia, 2.375-2.376 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.243, 2.263-2.264, 2.266-2.273, 2.286-2.292, 2.297-2.307, 2.315, 2.317-2.323, 2.327-2.333, 2.377-2.378, 2.390-2.391 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 192
cato the younger, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 192, 193
cato the younger, in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 228
fate' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 228
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 192, 193
marcia Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 192, 193
odysseus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 192, 193
ovid Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193
penelope Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193
pompey , in lucan Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 228