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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7468
Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.14-2.15


nanMatter unformed to his subduing hand, And realms unbalanced, fix by stern decree' Unalterable laws to bind the whole (Himself, too, bound by law), so that for aye All Nature moves within its fated bounds? Or, is Chance sovereign over all, and we The sport of Fortune and her turning wheel? Whate'er be truth, keep thou the future veiled From mortal vision, and amid their fears May men still hope. Thus known how great the woes


nanMatter unformed to his subduing hand, And realms unbalanced, fix by stern decree' Unalterable laws to bind the whole (Himself, too, bound by law), so that for aye All Nature moves within its fated bounds? Or, is Chance sovereign over all, and we The sport of Fortune and her turning wheel? Whate'er be truth, keep thou the future veiled From mortal vision, and amid their fears May men still hope. Thus known how great the woes


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.54 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.54. Adiungamus philosophis doctissimum hominem, poe+tam quidem divinum, Sophoclem; qui, cum ex aede Herculis patera aurea gravis subrepta esset, in somnis vidit ipsum deum dicentem, qui id fecisset. Quod semel ille iterumque neglexit. Ubi idem saepius, ascendit in Arium pagum, detulit rem; Areopagitae conprehendi iubent eum, qui a Sophocle erat nominatus; is quaestione adhibita confessus est pateramque rettulit. Quo facto fanum illud Indicis Herculis nominatum est. 1.54. To the testimony of philosophers let us add that of a most learned man and truly divine poet, Sophocles. A heavy gold dish having been stolen from the temple of Hercules, the god himself appeared to Sophocles in a dream and told who had committed the theft. But Sophocles ignored the dream a first and second time. When it came again and again, he went up to the Areopagus and laid the matter before the judges who ordered the man named by Sophocles to be arrested. The defendant after examination confessed his crime and brought back the dish. This is the reason why that temple is called the temple of Hercules the Informer. [26]
2. Catullus, Poems, 64 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.21-1.15.22, 2.11.1-2.11.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.721, 15.431-15.452 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.218, 6.724-6.751 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.218. Huge crags and two confronted promontories 6.724. Harries them thus? What wailing smites the air?” 6.725. To whom the Sibyl, “Far-famed prince of Troy 6.726. The feet of innocence may never pass 6.727. Into this house of sin. But Hecate 6.728. When o'er th' Avernian groves she gave me power 6.729. Taught me what penalties the gods decree 6.730. And showed me all. There Cretan Rhadamanth 6.731. His kingdom keeps, and from unpitying throne 6.732. Chastises and lays bare the secret sins 6.733. of mortals who, exulting in vain guile 6.734. Elude till death, their expiation due. 6.735. There, armed forever with her vengeful scourge 6.736. Tisiphone, with menace and affront 6.737. The guilty swarm pursues; in her left hand 6.738. She lifts her angered serpents, while she calls 6.739. A troop of sister-furies fierce as she. 6.740. Then, grating loud on hinge of sickening sound 6.741. Hell's portals open wide. 0, dost thou see 6.742. What sentinel upon that threshold sits 6.744. Far, far within the dragon Hydra broods 6.745. With half a hundred mouths, gaping and black; 6.746. And Tartarus slopes downward to the dark 6.747. Twice the whole space that in the realms of light 6.748. Th' Olympian heaven above our earth aspires. — 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 6.750. Roll lightning-blasted in the gulf profound; 6.751. The twin Aloidae Aloïdae , colossal shades
6. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.80-1.84, 2.1-2.2, 2.4-2.13, 2.15, 3.394, 6.419, 7.211, 7.386, 9.890-9.891 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 365-379, 364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.498-1.573, 3.377-3.417, 4.479-4.481 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
anchises Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
and n Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 145
argonauts Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
caesar, julius\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
cicero Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137, 145
colchis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 145
creation narratives, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
divination Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
ennius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 145
epictetus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
epicureanism Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137, 145; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 19, 199
eschatology, in lucans works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
fate Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 199
fear, and hope ( spes ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95, 97, 98
fear, source of error Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
grant, r. m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
hardie, philip Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
hope, and eros Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 19
hope, and fear Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 199
hope, and madness Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 19
jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95
johnson, w. r. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98
jupiter, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97
jupiter, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137, 145
juvenal Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
lucan, civil war Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
lucan, fear and hope Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95, 97, 98
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137, 145
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 145
mopsus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
natura Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
ovid, metamorphoses Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95
pessimism, as a consequence of deceived hopes Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 199
phineus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98
pompey Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 95, 97, 98
providence Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
quintilian Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137
seneca, thyestes Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
sol Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 98
stoicism Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137, 145; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 199
teleology Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 220
thyestes Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 169
venus, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
vespasian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 97, 98
virgil' Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 137