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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 9.46.7
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 130 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

130. ego haec a Chrysogono mea sponte remoto Sex. Roscio quaero, primum qua re civis optimi bona venierint, deinde qua re hominis eius qui neque proscriptus neque proscriptus Hotoman: om. codd. neque apud adversarios occisus est bona venierint venierunt ς α ω , cum cum quin πχ1ψ in eos solos lex scripta sit, deinde qua re aliquanto post eam diem venierint quae dies in lege praefinita est, deinde deinde denique Halm cur tantulo venierint. quae omnia si, quem ad modum solent liberti nequam et improbi facere, in patronum suum voluerit conferre, nihil egerit; nemo est enim qui nesciat propter magnitudinem rerum multa multos partim improbante partim imprudente partim improbante scripsi: om. codd. : partim invito Madvig : partim conivente Ascens. (1) L. Sulla commisisse.
2. Cicero, Letters To Quintus, 3.1.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20-21, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 4.29.7, 9.46.1-9.46.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 11.42-11.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.42. his darling child. Around him is a throng 11.43. of slaves, with all the Trojan multitude 11.44. and Ilian women, who the wonted way
6. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.70, 4.243-4.245, 4.503-4.504, 9.64 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Statius, Siluae, 2.6.68-2.6.70 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.4, 31.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Tiberius, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.
11. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 3.306-3.308 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.45.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.45.3.  Another likeness they set up in the temple of Quirinus with the inscription, "To the Invincible God," and another on the Capitol beside the former kings of Rome.
13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
14. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates statue of his father Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates temple of pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
catulus, (quintus lutatius) Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
flavius scriba, gnaeus Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
invidia, of fortune Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
invidia, personification of Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
marcius philippus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
marius, (gaius) Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
patronage Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
populus romanus, its role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
rome, forum holitorium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, statues of seven kings on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, temple of quirinus, caesars statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, temple of tellus, ciceros interest in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tarquinius priscus Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 187
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, as display expenditure' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tullius cicero, q., his statue Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48