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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 6.1.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Suetonius, Nero, 38 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Tacitus, Annals, 15.41.1, 15.44.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.41.1.  It would not be easy to attempt an estimate of the private dwellings, tenement-blocks, and temples, which were lost; but the flames consumed, in their old-world sanctity, the temple dedicated to Luna by Servius Tullius, the great altar and chapel of the Arcadian Evander to the Present Hercules, the shrine of Jupiter Stator vowed by Romulus, the Palace of Numa, and the holy place of Vesta with the Penates of the Roman people. To these must be added the precious trophies won upon so many fields, the glories of Greek art, and yet again the primitive and uncorrupted memorials of literary genius; so that, despite the striking beauty of the rearisen city, the older generation recollects much that it proved impossible to replace. There were those who noted that the first outbreak of the fire took place on the nineteenth of July, the anniversary of the capture and burning of Rome by the Senones: others have pushed their researches so far as to resolve the interval between the two fires into equal numbers of years, of months, and of days. 15.44.1.  So far, the precautions taken were suggested by human prudence: now means were sought for appeasing deity, and application was made to the Sibylline books; at the injunction of which public prayers were offered to Vulcan, Ceres, and Proserpine, while Juno was propitiated by the matrons, first in the Capitol, then at the nearest point of the sea-shore, where water was drawn for sprinkling the temple and image of the goddess. Ritual banquets and all-night vigils were celebrated by women in the married state. But neither human help, nor imperial munificence, nor all the modes of placating Heaven, could stifle scandal or dispel the belief that the fire had taken place by order. Therefore, to scotch the rumour, Nero substituted as culprits, and punished with the utmost refinements of cruelty, a class of men, loathed for their vices, whom the crowd styled Christians. Christus, the founder of the name, had undergone the death penalty in the reign of Tiberius, by sentence of the procurator Pontius Pilatus, and the pernicious superstition was checked for a moment, only to break out once more, not merely in Judaea, the home of the disease, but in the capital itself, where all things horrible or shameful in the world collect and find a vogue. First, then, the confessed members of the sect were arrested; next, on their disclosures, vast numbers were convicted, not so much on the count of arson as for hatred of the human race. And derision accompanied their end: they were covered with wild beasts' skins and torn to death by dogs; or they were fastened on crosses, and, when daylight failed were burned to serve as lamps by night. Nero had offered his Gardens for the spectacle, and gave an exhibition in his Circus, mixing with the crowd in the habit of a charioteer, or mounted on his car. Hence, in spite of a guilt which had earned the most exemplary punishment, there arose a sentiment of pity, due to the impression that they were being sacrificed not for the welfare of the state but to the ferocity of a single man.
3. Justinian, Digest, 47.9.9 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archives Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
babylon, babylonians Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
burning alive Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
camillus Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 154
capitol Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
dedication (temple, epigraphic) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
fire (as purification) Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
inscriptional intermediality Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
judgment day Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
julius caesar octavian, c./augustus. Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
law of the twelve tables Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
lieux de mémoire (sites of memory) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
sack of rome Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
sin Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
site, of memory Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300
sodom Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
tablets Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
temple destruction Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
theatre Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 257
victory (military)' Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 300