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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 4.29.7
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20-21, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 9.46.6-9.46.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.74, 36.28, 36.34-36.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.4, 31.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Tiberius, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
antony, marc, and bacchus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
apollo, as citharode Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
arion Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
artemis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
augustus, and apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, and romanitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, and the palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, civilization versus barbarism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, his hellenism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jews, c. sosius defeats Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
julia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
latona Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
liberalitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
lysippus, his hercules epitrapezios Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
martial Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
niobe Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
periander of corinth Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
philiscus of rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 66
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
praxiteles, niobe and the niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, gauls depicted on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo palatinus, portico of the danaids Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
scopas, niobe and the niobidae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
seleucia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
simulacrum versus signum, of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
sosius, c., and herod the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
sosius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, as display expenditure' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
timarchides, works in temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 244
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48