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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 1.13


nanThen it was that the Sabine women, whose wrongs had led to the war, throwing off all womanish fears in their distress, went boldly into the midst of the flying missiles with dishevelled hair and rent garments. [2] Running across the space between the two armies they tried to stop any further fighting and calm the excited passions by appealing to their fathers in the one army and their husbands in the other not to bring upon themselves a curse by staining their hands with the blood of a father-in-law or a son-in-law, nor upon their posterity the taint of parricide., ‘If,’ they cried, ‘you are weary of these ties of kindred, these marriage-bonds, then turn your anger upon us; it is we who are the cause of the war, it is we who have wounded and slain our husbands and fathers. Better for us to perish rather than live without one or the other of you, as widows or as orphans.’ [4] The armies and their leaders were alike moved by this appeal. There was a sudden hush and silence. Then the generals advanced to arrange the terms of a treaty. It was not only peace that was made, the two nations were united into one State, the royal power was shared between them, and the seat of government for both nations was Rome. [5] After thus doubling the City, a concession was made to the Sabines in the new appellation of Quirites, from their old capital of Cures. As a memorial of the battle, the place where Curtius got his horse out of the deep marsh on to safer ground was called the Curtian lake., The joyful peace, which put an abrupt close to such a deplorable war, made the Sabine women still dearer to their husbands and fathers, and most of all to Romulus himself. [7] Consequently when he effected the distribution of the people into the thirty curiae, he affixed their names to the curiae. No doubt there were many more than thirty women, and tradition is silent as to whether those whose names were given to the curiae were selected on the ground of age, or on that of personal distinction — either their own or their husbands' — or merely by lot. [8] The enrolment of the three centuries of knights took place at the same time; the Ramnenses were called after Romulus, the Titienses from T. Tatius. The origin of the Luceres and why they were so called is uncertain. Thenceforward the two kings exercised their joint sovereignty with perfect harmony.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Cicero, Republic, 2.12-2.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.12. Atque haec quidem perceleriter confecit; nam et urbem constituit, quam e suo nomine Romam iussit nominari, et ad firmandam novam civitatem novum quoddam et subagreste consilium, sed ad muniendas opes regni ac populi sui magni hominis et iam tum longe providentis secutus est, cum Sabinas honesto ortas loco virgines, quae Romam ludorum gratia venissent, quos tum primum anniversarios in circo facere instituisset, Consualibus rapi iussit easque in familiarum amplissimarum matrimoniis collocavit. 2.13. Qua ex causa cum bellum Romanis Sabini intulissent proeliique certamen varium atque anceps fuisset, cum T. Tatio, rege Sabinorum, foedus icit matronis ipsis, quae raptae erant, orantibus; quo foedere et Sabinos in civitatem adscivit sacris conmunicatis et regnum suum cum illorum rege sociavit. 2.14. Post interitum autem Tatii cum ad eum dominatus omnis reccidisset, quamquam cum Tatio in regium consilium delegerat principes (qui appellati sunt propter caritatem patres) populumque et suo et Tatii nomine et Lucumonis, qui Romuli socius in Sabino proelio occiderat, in tribus tris curiasque triginta discripserat (quas curias earum nominibus nuncupavit, quae ex Sabinis virgines raptae postea fuerant oratrices pacis et foederis)—sed quamquam ea Tatio sic erant discripta vivo, tamen eo interfecto multo etiam magis Romulus patrum auctoritate consilioque regnavit.
2. Livy, History, 1.9-1.12, 1.13.4, 1.58.5, 6.29.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 3.167, 3.170, 3.177, 3.183-3.188, 3.218 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.167. ‘If it’s right for the secret promptings of the god 3.183. If you ask where my son’s palace was 3.184. See there, that house made of straw and reeds. 3.185. He snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw 3.186. Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars. 3.187. Already the Roman’s name extended beyond his city 3.188. Though he possessed neither wife nor father-in-law.
4. Propertius, Elegies, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Romulus, 15, 19-20, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Pseudo-Quintilian, Major Declamations, 18.5



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
cato the elder Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
child-rearing, willingness for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, among lower classes Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, voluntary Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, as disappointments Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
children, as future citizens Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, illegitimate Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, marriage and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
children, proving paternity of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, resemblance to fathers Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
cicero, m. tullius Kingsley Monti and Rood, The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography (2022) 88
cicero Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
conubium Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
cornelia (daughter of scribonia) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
death, of spouses Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
declamatory sources Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
demography, citizen population Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
dowry Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
fathers, childrens resemblance to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, illegitimate children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, proving paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fecunditas, as female virtue Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
fecunditas, praise for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
horatia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
identity as hybrid and malleable, in roman perception Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
imperial expansionism Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
infanticide Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
intermarriage, romans and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
juridical authorities, on establishing paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
livy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
livy (t. livius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
lucretia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
marriage, and children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
men, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
mythic origins as identity marker, of romans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
pignora/pignora pacis Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
plutarch Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
poverty Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
proletarii Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
propertius (sex. propertius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
pudicitia, fecunditas and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
reproduction, social obligation of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
resemblance, family Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
roman state, duty owed to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, expansion of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, health of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
rome/romans, and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
rome/romans, conglomerate character of Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
sabine, and marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
sabine women Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89, 145
sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
sabines as austere, women rape of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
sparta/spartans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
titus tatius Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, ideal Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
women and girls, as objects and subjects' Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
women and girls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146