Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 1.12


nanHowever this may be, the Sabines were in possession of the citadel. And they would not come down from it the next day, though the Roman army was drawn up in battle array over the whole of the ground between the Palatine and the Capitoline hill, until, exasperated at the loss of their citadel and determined to recover it, the Romans mounted to the attack. [2] Advancing before the rest, Mettius Curtius, on the side of the Sabines, and Hostius Hostilius, on the side of the Romans, engaged in single combat., Hostius, fighting on disadvantageous ground, upheld the fortunes of Rome by his intrepid bravery, but at last he fell; the Roman line broke and fled to what was then the gate of the Palatine. [4] Even Romulus was being swept away by the crowd of fugitives, and lifting up his hands to heaven he exclaimed: ‘Jupiter, it was thy omen that I obeyed when I laid here on the Palatine the earliest foundations of the City. Now the Sabines hold its citadel, having bought it by a bribe, and coming thence have seized the valley and are pressing hitherwards in battle. [5] Do thou, Father of gods and men, drive hence our foes, banish terror from Roman hearts, and stay our shameful flight!, Here do I vow a temple to thee, ‘Jove Stator (the Stayer),’ as a memorial for the generations to come that it is through thy present help that the City has been saved.’ [7] Then, as though he had become aware that his prayer had been heard, he cried, ‘Back, Romans! Jupiter Optimus Maximus bids you stand and renew the battle.’ [8] They stopped as though commanded by a voice from heaven-Romulus dashed up to the foremost line, just as Mettius Curtius had run down from the citadel in front of the Sabines and driven the Romans in headlong flight over the whole of the ground now occupied by the Forum. He was now not far from the gate of the Palatine, and was shouting: ‘We have conquered our faithless hosts, our cowardly foes; now they know that to carry off maidens is a very different thing from fighting with men.’, In the midst of these vaunts Romulus, with a compact body of valiant troops, charged down on him. Mettius happened to be on horseback, so he was the more easily driven back, the Romans followed in pursuit, and, inspired by the courage of their king, the rest of the Roman army routed the Sabines. [10] Mettius, unable to control his horse, maddened by the noise of his pursuers, plunged into a morass. The danger of their general drew off the attention of the Sabines for a moment from the battle; they called out and made signals to encourage him, so, animated to fresh efforts, he succeeded in extricating himself. Thereupon the Romans and Sabines renewed the fighting in the middle of the valley, but the fortune of Rome was in the ascendant.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.5. Very well," rejoined Cotta, "let us then proceed as the argument itself may lead us. But before we come to the subject, let me say a few words about myself. I am considerably influenced by your authority, Balbus, and by the plea that you put forward at the conclusion of your discourse, when you exhorted me to remember that I am both a Cotta and a pontife. This no doubt meant that I ought to uphold the beliefs about the immortal gods which have come down to us from our ancestors, and the rites and ceremonies and duties of religion. For my part I always shall uphold them and always have done so, and no eloquence of anybody, learned or unlearned, shall ever dislodge me from the belief as to the worship of the immortal gods which I have inherited from our forefathers. But on any question of el I am guided by the high pontifes, Titus Coruncanius, Publius Scipio and Publius Scaevola, not by Zeno or Cleanthes or Chrysippus; and I have Gaius Laelius, who was both an augur and a philosopher, to whose discourse upon religion, in his famous oration, I would rather listen than to any leader of the Stoics. The religion of the Roman people comprises ritual, auspices, and the third additional division consisting of all such prophetic warnings as the interpreters of the Sybil or the soothsayers have derived from portents and prodigies. While, I have always thought that none of these departments of religion was to be despised, and I have held the conviction that Romulus by his auspices and Numa by his establishment of our ritual laid the foundations of our state, which assuredly could never have been as great as it is had not the fullest measure of divine favour been obtained for it.
2. Cicero, Republic, 2.12-2.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.12. Atque haec quidem perceleriter confecit; nam et urbem constituit, quam e suo nomine Romam iussit nominari, et ad firmandam novam civitatem novum quoddam et subagreste consilium, sed ad muniendas opes regni ac populi sui magni hominis et iam tum longe providentis secutus est, cum Sabinas honesto ortas loco virgines, quae Romam ludorum gratia venissent, quos tum primum anniversarios in circo facere instituisset, Consualibus rapi iussit easque in familiarum amplissimarum matrimoniis collocavit. 2.13. Qua ex causa cum bellum Romanis Sabini intulissent proeliique certamen varium atque anceps fuisset, cum T. Tatio, rege Sabinorum, foedus icit matronis ipsis, quae raptae erant, orantibus; quo foedere et Sabinos in civitatem adscivit sacris conmunicatis et regnum suum cum illorum rege sociavit. 2.14. Post interitum autem Tatii cum ad eum dominatus omnis reccidisset, quamquam cum Tatio in regium consilium delegerat principes (qui appellati sunt propter caritatem patres) populumque et suo et Tatii nomine et Lucumonis, qui Romuli socius in Sabino proelio occiderat, in tribus tris curiasque triginta discripserat (quas curias earum nominibus nuncupavit, quae ex Sabinis virgines raptae postea fuerant oratrices pacis et foederis)—sed quamquam ea Tatio sic erant discripta vivo, tamen eo interfecto multo etiam magis Romulus patrum auctoritate consilioque regnavit.
3. Livy, History, 1.6-1.11, 1.13, 1.13.4, 1.18-1.21, 1.58.5, 6.20.5, 6.20.9-6.20.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Fasti, 3.167, 3.170, 3.177, 3.183-3.188, 3.218 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.167. ‘If it’s right for the secret promptings of the god 3.183. If you ask where my son’s palace was 3.184. See there, that house made of straw and reeds. 3.185. He snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw 3.186. Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars. 3.187. Already the Roman’s name extended beyond his city 3.188. Though he possessed neither wife nor father-in-law.
5. Propertius, Elegies, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE

6. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 12.52-12.53 (1st cent. CE

12.52.  Such a wondrous vision did you devise and fashion, one in very truth a Charmer of grief and anger, that from men All the remembrance of their ills could loose! So great the radiance and so great the charm with which your art has clothed it. Indeed it is not reasonable to suppose that even Hephaestus himself would criticize this work if he judged it by the pleasure and delight which it affords the eye of man." "But, on the other hand, was the shape you by your artistry produced appropriate to a god and was its form worthy of the divine nature, when you not only used a material which gives delight but also presented a human form of extraordinary beauty and size; and apart from its being a man's shape, made also all the other attributes as you have made them? that is the question which I invite you to consider now. And if you make a satisfactory defence on these matters before those present and convince them that you have discovered the proper and fitting shape and form for the foremost and greatest god, then you shall receive in addition a second reward, greater and more perfect than the one given by the Eleans. 12.53.  For you see that the issue is no small one, nor the danger, for us. Since in times past, because we had no clear knowledge, we formed each his different idea, and each person, according to his capacity and nature, conceived a likeness for every divine manifestation and fashioned such likenesses in his dreams; and if we do perchance collect any small and insignificant likenesses made by the earlier artists, we do not trust them very much nor pay them very much attention. But you by the power of your art first conquered and united Hellas and then all others by means of this wondrous presentment, showing forth so marvellous and dazzling a conception, that none of those who have beheld it could any longer easily form a different one.
7. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Romulus, 17.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.5. And Tarpeius also was convicted of treason when prosecuted by Romulus, as, according to Juba, Sulpicius Galba relates. of those who write differently about Tarpeia, they are worthy of no belief at all who say that she was a daughter of Tatius, the leader of the Sabines, and was living with Romulus under compulsion, and acted and suffered as she did, at her father’s behest; of these, Antigonus is one. And Simylus the poet is altogether absurd in supposing that Tarpeia betrayed the Capitol, not to the Sabines, but to the Gauls, because she had fallen in love with their king. These are his words:— And Tarpeia, who dwelt hard by the Capitolian steep, Became the destroyer of the walls of Rome; She longed to be the wedded wife of the Gallic chieftain, And betrayed the homes of her fathers. And a little after, speaking of her death:— Her the Boni and the myriad tribes of Gauls Did not, exulting, cast amid the currents of the Po; But hurled the shields from their belligerent arms Upon the hateful maid, and made their ornament her doom.
10. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pseudo-Quintilian, Major Declamations, 18.5

12. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3-1.11.5



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
aeneas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
antiphilus, his alexander, philip, and athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
augury Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
augustus, and alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
augustus/octavian, urban buildings / monuments Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
caecilius metellus macedonicus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96, 262
cato the elder Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
child-rearing, willingness for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, among lower classes Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, voluntary Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, as disappointments Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
children, as future citizens Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, illegitimate Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, marriage and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
children, proving paternity of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, resemblance to fathers Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
cicero Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
conubium Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
cornelia (daughter of scribonia) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
death, of spouses Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
declamatory sources Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
demography, citizen population Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
dowry Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
fathers, childrens resemblance to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, illegitimate children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, proving paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fecunditas, as female virtue Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
fecunditas, praise for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
festus (grammarian) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
gauls, gallic sack Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
gauls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
greece, culture appropriated by romans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
hesperia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
horatia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
identity as hybrid and malleable, in roman perception Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
imperial expansionism Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
india Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
infanticide Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
intermarriage, romans and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
juno, and greeks and trojans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
juridical authorities, on establishing paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
landscape and topography Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
livy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
livy (t. livius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
lucretia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
lysippus, his granicus group Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
macedonia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96, 262
marriage, and children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
men, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
monumentality/monuments Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
mythic origins as identity marker, of romans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
myths, numa pompilius Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
pignora/pignora pacis Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
plutarch Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
poverty Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
praxiteles, aphrodite of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96
proletarii Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
propertius (sex. propertius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
pudicitia, fecunditas and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96
reproduction, social obligation of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
resemblance, family Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
rites Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
roman state, duty owed to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, expansion of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, health of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
rome, portico of metellus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96, 262
rome, portico of octavia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
rome, temple of juno regina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
rome, temple of jupiter stator Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
rome/romans, and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
rome/romans, conglomerate character of Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
rome ara pacis, basilica aemilia (frieze) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, forum Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, porta pandana Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, statue of tarpeia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, tarpeian rock Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rome ara pacis, tarpeian tomb/grave Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
romulus, and jupiter stator Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
romulus Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
romulus and camillus, in warfare Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
rüpke, j., war with Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
sabine, and marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
sabine women Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89, 145
sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
sabines as austere, enfranchisement and belonging Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
sabines as austere, women rape of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
simylus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
skepticism, academic' Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
sparta/spartans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
tarpeia as amazon, and/as roman places Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
tarpeia as amazon, worship of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
titus tatius Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
treason and proditio Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 40
venus, of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 96
vergil, and the aeneid Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 262
voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, ideal Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
women and girls, as objects and subjects Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
women and girls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146