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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7456
Livy, History, 1.11


nanWhilst the Romans were thus occupied, the army of the Antemnates seized the opportunity of their territory being unoccupied and made a raid into it. Romulus hastily led his legion against this fresh foe and surprised them as they were scattered over the fields. [2] At the very first battle-shout and charge the enemy were routed and their city captured. Whilst Romulus was exulting over this double victory, his wife, Hersilia, moved by the entreaties of the abducted maidens, implored him to pardon their parents and receive them into citizenship, for so the State would increase in unity and strength., He readily granted her request. He then advanced against the Crustuminians, who had commenced war, but their eagerness had been damped by the successive defeats of their neighbours, and they offered but slight resistance. [4] Colonies were planted in both places; owing to the fertility of the soil of the Crustumine district, the majority gave their names for that colony. On the other hand there were numerous migrations to Rome, mostly of the parents and relatives of the abducted maidens. [5] The last of these wars was commenced by the Sabines and proved the most serious of all, for nothing was done in passion or impatience; they masked their designs till war had actually commenced., Strategy was aided by craft and deceit, as the following incident shows. Spurius Tarpeius was in command of the Roman citadel. Whilst his daughter had gone outside the fortifications to fetch water for some religious ceremonies, Tatius bribed her to admit his troops within the citadel. [7] Once admitted, they crushed her to death beneath their shields, either that the citadel might appear to have been taken by assault, or that her example might be left as a warning that no faith should be kept with traitors. [8] A further story runs that the Sabines were in the habit of wearing heavy gold armlets on their left arms and richly jeweled rings, and that the girl made them promise to give her ‘what they had on their left arms,’ accordingly they piled their shields upon her instead of golden gifts., Some say that in bargaining for what they had in their left hands, she expressly asked for their shields, and being suspected of wishing to betray them, fell a victim to her own bargain.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.69, 3.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.69. She was called Diana because she made a sort of day in the night-time. She is invoked to assist at birth of children, because the period of gestation is either occasionally seven, or more usually nine, lunar revolutions, and these are called menses (months), because they cover measured (mensa) spaces. Timaeus in his history with his usual aptness adds to his account of the burning of the temple of Diana of Ephesus on the night on which Alexander was born the remark that this need cause no surprise, since Diana was away from home, wishing to be present when Olympias was brought to bed. Venus was so named by our countrymen as the goddess who 'comes' (venire) to all things; her name is not derived from the word venustas (beauty) but rather venustas from it. 3.5. Very well," rejoined Cotta, "let us then proceed as the argument itself may lead us. But before we come to the subject, let me say a few words about myself. I am considerably influenced by your authority, Balbus, and by the plea that you put forward at the conclusion of your discourse, when you exhorted me to remember that I am both a Cotta and a pontife. This no doubt meant that I ought to uphold the beliefs about the immortal gods which have come down to us from our ancestors, and the rites and ceremonies and duties of religion. For my part I always shall uphold them and always have done so, and no eloquence of anybody, learned or unlearned, shall ever dislodge me from the belief as to the worship of the immortal gods which I have inherited from our forefathers. But on any question of el I am guided by the high pontifes, Titus Coruncanius, Publius Scipio and Publius Scaevola, not by Zeno or Cleanthes or Chrysippus; and I have Gaius Laelius, who was both an augur and a philosopher, to whose discourse upon religion, in his famous oration, I would rather listen than to any leader of the Stoics. The religion of the Roman people comprises ritual, auspices, and the third additional division consisting of all such prophetic warnings as the interpreters of the Sybil or the soothsayers have derived from portents and prodigies. While, I have always thought that none of these departments of religion was to be despised, and I have held the conviction that Romulus by his auspices and Numa by his establishment of our ritual laid the foundations of our state, which assuredly could never have been as great as it is had not the fullest measure of divine favour been obtained for it.
2. Cicero, Republic, 2.12-2.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.12. Atque haec quidem perceleriter confecit; nam et urbem constituit, quam e suo nomine Romam iussit nominari, et ad firmandam novam civitatem novum quoddam et subagreste consilium, sed ad muniendas opes regni ac populi sui magni hominis et iam tum longe providentis secutus est, cum Sabinas honesto ortas loco virgines, quae Romam ludorum gratia venissent, quos tum primum anniversarios in circo facere instituisset, Consualibus rapi iussit easque in familiarum amplissimarum matrimoniis collocavit. 2.13. Qua ex causa cum bellum Romanis Sabini intulissent proeliique certamen varium atque anceps fuisset, cum T. Tatio, rege Sabinorum, foedus icit matronis ipsis, quae raptae erant, orantibus; quo foedere et Sabinos in civitatem adscivit sacris conmunicatis et regnum suum cum illorum rege sociavit. 2.14. Post interitum autem Tatii cum ad eum dominatus omnis reccidisset, quamquam cum Tatio in regium consilium delegerat principes (qui appellati sunt propter caritatem patres) populumque et suo et Tatii nomine et Lucumonis, qui Romuli socius in Sabino proelio occiderat, in tribus tris curiasque triginta discripserat (quas curias earum nominibus nuncupavit, quae ex Sabinis virgines raptae postea fuerant oratrices pacis et foederis)—sed quamquam ea Tatio sic erant discripta vivo, tamen eo interfecto multo etiam magis Romulus patrum auctoritate consilioque regnavit.
3. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.41-5.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Livy, History, 1.6-1.10, 1.12-1.13, 1.13.4, 1.18-1.21, 1.58.5, 34.7.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 3.167, 3.170, 3.177, 3.183-3.188, 3.218 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.167. ‘If it’s right for the secret promptings of the god 3.183. If you ask where my son’s palace was 3.184. See there, that house made of straw and reeds. 3.185. He snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw 3.186. Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars. 3.187. Already the Roman’s name extended beyond his city 3.188. Though he possessed neither wife nor father-in-law.
6. Propertius, Elegies, 4.4, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE

7. Plutarch, Romulus, 15, 19-20, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.2.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2.1. On entering the city there is a monument to Antiope the Amazon . This Antiope, Pindar says, was carried of by Peirithous and Theseus, but Hegias of Troezen gives the following account of her. Heracles was besieging Themiscyra on the Thermodon, but could not take it, but Antiope, falling in love with Theseus, who was aiding Heracles in his campaign, surrendered the stronghold. Such is the account of Hegias. But the Athenians assert that when the Amazons came, Antiope was shot by Molpadia, while Molpadia was killed by Theseus. To Molpadia also there is a monument among the Athenians.
9. Pseudo-Quintilian, Major Declamations, 18.5



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adornment Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
adultery Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
amazons Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
antigonus (historian) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
antiope Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
antiquarian / antiquarianism Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115
arne Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
augury Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
augustus/octavian Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115
briseis Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
caesar Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115, 119
cato the elder Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75; Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
child-rearing, willingness for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, among lower classes Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
childlessness, voluntary Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, as disappointments Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
children, as future citizens Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
children, illegitimate Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, marriage and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
children, proving paternity of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
children, resemblance to fathers Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
cicero Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 146
class (social, political, etc.) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
conubium Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
cornelia (daughter of scribonia) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
death, of spouses Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
declamatory sources Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
demography, citizen population Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56, 140, 146
dowry Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
ethnicity Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
exempla and exemplarity Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115, 140
fabius pictor Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56, 114, 140
family Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56, 114
fathers, childrens resemblance to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, illegitimate children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fathers, proving paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
fecunditas, as female virtue Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
fecunditas, praise for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
festus (grammarian) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
gender, roles Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 115
gender Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 119
greece and greeks Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
greed and bribery and acquisitiveness Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56, 114
hannibal Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
horatia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
identity Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
identity as hybrid and malleable, in roman perception Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
imperial expansionism Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
infanticide Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
intermarriage, romans and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
italy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
juridical authorities, on establishing paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
landscape and topography Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
language, linguistics, power of words, analogy and anomaly Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115, 119
language, linguistics, power of words, as politics Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115
language, linguistics, power of words, etymology Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
language, linguistics, power of words Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115, 119
livy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 139, 140, 146
livy (t. livius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
love, eros, and sexuality Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 114, 115
lucretia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
luxury and anti-luxury Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
marriage, and children Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
men, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
monumentality/monuments Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 114
mythic origins as identity marker, of romans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
myths, numa pompilius Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
nanis Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
paternity Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
patriotism/tarpeia as patriot Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115
pedasa Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
pignora/pignora pacis Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
piso frugi (l. calpurnius) Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
plutarch Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 146
polycrite Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
poverty Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
proletarii Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
propertius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 115
propertius (sex. propertius) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
pudicitia, fecunditas and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 139, 140, 146
reader and audience Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 140
reproduction, social obligation of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
republic, roman, reaction to hannibal Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
resemblance, family Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88
rites Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
roman state, duty owed to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, expansion of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, health of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
roman state, voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
rome/romans, and sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
rome/romans, conglomerate character of Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 119
rome ara pacis, tarpeian grove Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
rome ara pacis, tarpeian rock Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 114, 119
rome ara pacis, tarpeian tomb/grave Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
romulus Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
romulus and camillus, in warfare Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 119, 139
romulus and camillus, qualities as a ruler Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 139
sabine, and marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
sabine women Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 88, 89, 145
sabines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
sabines as austere, as luxurious Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 140
sabines as austere, identity and value of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
sabines as austere, women rape of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 139, 146
skepticism, academic' Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 165
sparta/spartans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
spurius tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34, 139
tarpeia as amazon, and/as roman places Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
tarpeia as amazon, as roman patriot Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 115
tarpeia as amazon, as sabine Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
tarpeia as amazon, as vestal Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 115
tarpeia as amazon, origin of myth Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
tarpeia as amazon, the name tarpeia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114
tatius king of sabines Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 119, 140
theseus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
titus tatius Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 75
treason and proditio Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
treasonous girl mytheme Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
varro Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 114, 115, 119
voluntary childlessness Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, duty to roman state Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 145
women, ideal Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 89
women and girls, and wealth/power Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 56
women and girls, as city Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 34
women and girls, as objects and subjects Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
women and girls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146