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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7423
Libanius, Orations, 12.69
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. New Testament, Luke, 21.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21.6. As for these things which you see, the days will come, in which there will not be left here one stone on another that will not be thrown down.
2. Libanius, Orations, 12.80, 12.82 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

3. Theodoret of Cyrus, Ecclesiastical History, 3.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3.6. Julian, wishing to make a campaign against the Persians, dispatched the trustiest of his officers to all the oracles throughout the Roman Empire, while he himself went as a suppliant to implore the Pythian oracle of Daphne to make known to him the future. The oracle responded that the corpses lying hard by were becoming an obstacle to divination; that they must first be removed to another spot; and that then he would utter his prophecy, for, said he, I could say nothing, if the grove be not purified. Now at that time there were lying there the relics of the victorious martyr Babylas and the lads who had gloriously suffered with him, and the lying prophet was plainly stopped from uttering his wonted lies by the holy influence of Babylas. Julian was aware of this, for his ancient piety had taught him the power of victorious martyrs, and so he removed no other body from the spot, but only ordered the worshippers of Christ to translate the relics of the victorious martyrs. They marched with joy to the grove, put the coffin on a car and went before it leading a vast concourse of people, singing the psalms of David, while at every pause they shouted Shame be to all them that worship molten images. For they understood the translation of the martyr to mean defeat for the demon.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antioch, site of imperial court under julian Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
antioch or antiocheans Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
authority Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
christians Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
iamblichus, neoplatonist Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
imperial, government Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
julian (the apostate), generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255, 1268
julian (the apostate), interest in prophecy Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
julian (the apostate), life Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
julian (the apostate), neo-platonism Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
maximus Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
neo-platonism, and julian Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1255
paganism Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
persia or persians Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
priests Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
religious Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
representation Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227
soldiers' Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 227